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Old 08-16-2003, 11:06 AM   #1
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term definition

Can someone please clarify the term filiamentous algae for me? Maybe give me and example or two of what kinds it would consist of.
Thanks.
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Old 08-16-2003, 11:24 AM   #2
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i would call hair algae a filiamentous algae.
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Old 08-16-2003, 11:56 AM   #3
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Filamentous algae does not have true leaves, stems or roots.

Filamentous algae are single algae cells that form long visible chains, threads, or filaments. These filaments intertwine forming a mat that resembles wet wool. Filamentous algae starts growing along the bottom in shallow water or attached to structures in the water (like rocks or other aquatic plants). Often filamentous algae floats to the surface forming large mats, which are commonly referred to as “pond scums”. There are many species of filamentous algae and often more than one species will be present at the same time in the pond.

Submerged portions of all aquatic plants provide habitats for many micro and macro invertebrates (i.e. bugs, worms, etc.). These invertebrates in turn are used as food by fish and other wildlife species (e.g. amphibians, reptiles, ducks, etc.). After aquatic plants die, their decomposition by bacteria and fungi provides food (called “detritus”) for many aquatic invertebrates. Filamentous algae has no known direct food value to wildlife.

As taken from:

http://wildthings.tamu.edu/aquaplant...ilamentous.htm
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Old 08-16-2003, 05:56 PM   #4
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Examples...
Derbesia


Bryopsis
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Old 08-16-2003, 09:11 PM   #5
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Dang Tim,

You scared me there! I thought you were just quoting that stuff for a while there... 8O
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