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Old 09-12-2011, 08:39 PM   #21
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The tap water comes from a well, smacked between two giant slabs of limestone. From the tap, akalinity is above 300 (unmeasurable), ph is well above 8.6, and hardness is around 300gh (maybe higher, idk). Everything seems pretty dismal about the lack of water quality, but I keep making the joke about not having to worry about chlorine
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Old 09-12-2011, 08:51 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by RDouglas50
The tap water comes from a well, smacked between two giant slabs of limestone. From the tap, akalinity is above 300 (unmeasurable), ph is well above 8.6, and hardness is around 300gh (maybe higher, idk). Everything seems pretty dismal about the lack of water quality, but I keep making the joke about not having to worry about chlorine
There still might be a disconnect...so, you're trying to lower the alkalinity by doing a fishless cycle? (Sorry if I'm still not understanding).

While technically that may happen, the second you do a water change you restore all of the buffers, alkalinity and natural pH of the tap water back into the aquarium. Since once the tank is cycled, established and stocked... 25% weekly water changes are part of your maintenance...the tap water and aquarium water will always be near identical.

The only real option for lowering the alkalinity / hardness of your water is by using purification like reverse osmosis. Normally this is only for saltwater hobbyists since most freshwater fish can adapt to a wide range of water conditions as long as it is stable. If you did choose to use purified water...make sure you do your research because pure water alone is not suitable for an aquarium. Minerals and electrolytes must be added back in before using it in your fish tank.

Bettas are very tough fish, and I'd be surprised if they didn't still do well even in hard water. The key is to acclimate them very slowly to the new water when they are introduced. I personally drip-acclimate all my new fish. There's some great videos on YouTube about how to do it.

All that said, I still always advise fishless cycling to prepare any tank for fish unless you have tons of seeded media which is capable of handling your bio-load.
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:00 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eco23

There still might be a disconnect...so, you're trying to lower the alkalinity by doing a fishless cycle? (Sorry if I'm still not understanding).

While technically that may happen, the second you do a water change you restore all of the buffers, alkalinity and natural pH of the tap water back into the aquarium. Since once the tank is cycled, established and stocked... 25% weekly water changes are part of your maintenance...the tap water and aquarium water will always be near identical.

The only real option for lowering the alkalinity / hardness of your water is by using purification like reverse osmosis. Normally this is only for saltwater hobbyists since most freshwater fish can adapt to a wide range of water conditions as long as it is stable. If you did choose to use purified water...make sure you do your research because pure water alone is not suitable for an aquarium. Minerals and electrolytes must be added back in before using it in your fish tank.

Bettas are very tough fish, and I'd be surprised if they didn't still do well even in hard water. The key is to acclimate them very slowly to the new water when they are introduced. I personally drip-acclimate all my new fish. There's some great videos on YouTube about how to do it.

All that said, I still always advise fishless cycling to prepare any tank for fish unless you have tons of seeded media which is capable of handling your bio-load.
That's exactly what I was trying to do.

As far as the reverse osmosis, is that done by purchasing purified water? Or is there a website that can explain this?
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:10 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDouglas50

That's exactly what I was trying to do.

As far as the reverse osmosis, is that done by purchasing purified water? Or is there a website that can explain this?
Here's a decent explanation of RO and how it works. Just remember it's not as simple as purifying the water and adding it into the tank. There are additives which need to be added to the water after it is purified. You could either purchase your own RO unit, or I believe some fish stores sell it at their stores.

I would do more research of what alkalinity Bettas are capable of thriving in. Almost all freshwater fish can be happy in any pH unless it is at extreme levels. Stability is what's important. However, if the pH / alkalinity levels really are literally off the charts...purification may be worth looking into. Make sure you are using a quality liquid test kit...not strips to get your results.

A tank will also still need to be cycled regardless of the water source.

http://www.fosterandsmithaquatics.co...id=421&aid=842
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:24 PM   #25
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I saw some tabs at petco the other day, almost like alka-seltzer tab, that dechlorinates and adds essential minerals to the water, could I feasibly use something like that in distilled water for the same desired effect?

Also do you think having better quality water will also clear up the foam problem i have?

Great advice thank you.
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:33 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by RDouglas50
I saw some tabs at petco the other day, almost like alka-seltzer tab, that dechlorinates and adds essential minerals to the water, could I feasibly use something like that in distilled water for the same desired effect?

Also do you think having better quality water will also clear up the foam problem i have?

Great advice thank you.
I've got no clue about the foam...I guess it could be from the additive you used that I'm unfamiliar with (I really suggest against using any additives other than water conditioner). By the way, even though you're on a well...using a dechlorinator / water conditioner like Seachem Prime is still a good idea to neutralize other things found in well water.

I don't trust products like those tabs. If you're going to use additives with purified water, I'd use a quality product like Seachem or Kent's. The link I included before had a hyper-link which shows their different freshwater additives-
http://www.fosterandsmithaquatics.co...3578/4395/4410

The danger with using any type of product which alters water chemistry is that it creates an unstable environment for your fish if not prepared correctly before the water is ever added to the tank. Every fish will always prefer stable water (even if it is not considered "ideal"), as opposed to fluctuations which can be very harmful to them.

Before even considering RO or additives...I'd make sure you are testing your water with a quality liquid test kit like an API Master Kit to ensure your results are accurate. Then I'd do more research and be certain it's unsuitable for Bettas. Again, most fish can adapt to virtually any pH level as long as it is stable.
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:47 PM   #27
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Thank you for all the advice and links, I'm sure it'll all help once I get a chance to process all this information, lol. It's a lot to take in, of course, I have some time before my tank cycles to study and figure out my game plan.
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:50 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by RDouglas50
Thank you for all the advice and links, I'm sure it'll all help once I get a chance to process all this information, lol. It's a lot to take in, of course, I have some time before my tank cycles to study and figure out my game plan.
Happy to help . Feel free to ask any other questions you think of about anything including your cycle. Keep us posted
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:55 PM   #29
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Allot of the times just having a stable PH is better than having the perfect PH. The water from my tap is pretty high, but all my amazon fish that "require" a low PH are doing fine. I Did add Driftwood and oakleaves to help lower it naturally. For along time i was obssesed with getting the perfect PH but could never get it to drop. Fish are highly adaptable and most captive bred fish are the spawn of many generations of having a PH that is diffrent from their natural habbitat. Good luck to you.
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Old 09-13-2011, 03:32 AM   #30
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not foam, its a betta nest. bubble nest ...
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