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Old 08-17-2006, 06:42 PM   #1
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Python and cycling

I am currently cycling my tank with fish in it, and checked my ammonia today and it was around i would say 1.25 in the ammonia scale, so i busted out the python for the first time (very easy to use) and took out about 25% of the water maybe alittle less, and then filled it back up, not quite to where it was before, so that the HOB filter would fall alittle farther and get some better water movement and air into the water. But anyway i waited for about an hour and checked the water again, now its alittle lower but not a whole lot, it isnt down to the .25 scale yet i would say its somewhere between .25 and 1.5 somewhere around .5 to .75, just an estimate with color. So i need to do another water change, how soon can i do another one, with how much water without causing any real stress to the fish.
Mitch
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Old 08-17-2006, 07:05 PM   #2
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If you are cycling your tank I wouldn't switch the water out again. I have a pair of black phantom tetra's and they both survived the ammonia cycle (got up into the .5-.75 range).

Just remember that every time you switch out the water you are slowing down the cycle. If you delute it any futher it could cause a serious delay. I would cut back on feeding to once a day if you haven't already. Also I would suggest you clean up after feeding them and not let any extra food in the water.

HTH, Mine are currently going through the Nitrite cycle right now (up into the 2-3ppm range, I fear for my little guys!) and I am hoping they can make it through.
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Old 08-17-2006, 08:32 PM   #3
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The bacteria you are growing can only process what they can handle. Water change will not slow your cycle down that much. If you care about the fish in the tank you want to keep ammonia and nitrite as close to .5 ppm as possible. This could mean daily 50% water changes.
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Old 08-17-2006, 09:22 PM   #4
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Do a 50-70% water change immediately. Since you are cycling with fish you want 0.5 ammonia and nitrite as the maximum levels. Yes fish can survive worse, but they also usually suffer from damage that shortens their life.

During the cycle, you can do as many water changes as you like as long as you don't distrub the substrate - that's one of the major growth sites for the bacteria. As long as you just remove and replace water, you won't slow the cycle down.

Also, don't replace the filter while you are cycling. If it gets dirty, just rinse it off in some of the tank water you are removing.
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Old 08-17-2006, 10:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptnIgnit
If you are cycling your tank I wouldn't switch the water out again. ....
Just remember that every time you switch out the water you are slowing down the cycle. If you delute it any futher it could cause a serious delay. I would cut back on feeding to once a day if you haven't already. Also I would suggest you clean up after feeding them and not let any extra food in the water.

HTH, Mine are currently going through the Nitrite cycle right now (up into the 2-3ppm range, I fear for my little guys!) and I am hoping they can make it through.
Hi, this is actually incorrect - go ahead and do water changes (both of you). You can do 50% water changes daily. It will NOT affect the cycle since you can never remove all of the ammonia or all of the nitrites. There is very little of the good bacteria in the water column - it quickly settles into the filter and into the gravel and onto any decorations (and even your tank walls). Ammonia is VERY lethal - Nitrites are also lethal. Some fish are "hardy enough" to survive the cycle but that doesn't mean that they're perfectly fine - they are getting their gills burned.

Do your water changes and keep up with them until your cycle is finished. The need for so many water changes is one of the main reasons that a fishless cycle is recommended so widely on this site. It allows you to build up a nice healthy batch of good bacteria so that you can almost fully stock once the cycle is over, and you don't have to do any water changes during it.
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Old 08-17-2006, 10:41 PM   #6
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aww that sucks, i vacumed the rocks at the bottom of my tank. Son of a... ok well i guess i know what not to do now, ill just keep changing the water, thanks alot.
Mitchell
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Old 08-17-2006, 11:03 PM   #7
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Well color me confused, I was always told not to do water changes during the cycle.

Good to know for future reference, nitrites started moving down today for me, 1.0-1.5ish now. Still will do the water change for good measure though.
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Old 08-17-2006, 11:10 PM   #8
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Hi CaptnIgnit - you don't do water changes during a fishless cycle but when there are fish present its best to do them to keep the ammonia and nitrites down. The ammonia and nitrites are a major cause of "new tank syndrome" (ie: unhealthy fish and fish deaths).

I was told the same things you were when I had my first tank 15 years ago. Thankfully the internet and the good people on this forum have re-educated me. I try to return the favor by passing along what I've learned here myself.
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Old 08-18-2006, 01:08 PM   #9
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Love the python. I've had one for at least 10-12 years now and can't even remember how hard it was to do water changes before.
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