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Old 04-29-2012, 05:03 PM   #1
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Sorry but this is another cycling question

Hello

Iím new to this site and to fish-keeping. I listen for the collective groan as I say that I did not do a fishless cycle. In my defence I didnít know it was possible at the time. Anyway, before you all tell me off, I'm sorry. I am here now and willing to learn.
Before posting, I have tried to find an answer to my question, but it seems that you need answers to very specific questions in order to help. I guess every tank is different, so here goes.

I set up my tank, a juwel rio 125 on 1st April. I added stuff to de-chlorinate the water and some anti-stress/liquid bacteria stuff as per the instructions on the bottle. I left it for a week before adding 8 zebra danios. Water temperature is approx 24oC and the pH is roughly 7.

I have been testing the water daily since I added the fish. I use a liquid test kit (not the strips). All readings are zero, although there could be a very slight trace of ammonia. Itís not really showing as dark as the first colour on the chart which is 0.6mg/l. The water in my tank was cloudy for a couple of days in the beginning but is very clear now.


The fish looked healthy enough and were active (but itís hard to tell with fish, I suppose). Unfortunately I lost two of them out of the blue. I found one trapped inside the filter, but I cannot find the other one. This happened about a week ago and the others seem to be ok.

Iím not sure if the fish swam into the filter during a water/filter change.
I have changed the top filter each week and the black filter yesterday (after one month). I have replaced approx 15l of water on two occasions.


With six fish in the tank (and probably a little corpse somewhere), I would have thought I would have seen a rise in ammonia, but still nothing.

Can anyone tell me why my tank isnít cycling yet? Is it just a case of waiting until it eventually happens or am I doing something wrong?


p.s. I donít know anyone with an established tank
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Old 04-29-2012, 05:15 PM   #2
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Hello

Iím new to this site and to fish-keeping. I listen for the collective groan as I say that I did not do a fishless cycle. In my defence I didnít know it was possible at the time. Anyway, before you all tell me off, I'm sorry. I am here now and willing to learn.
Before posting, I have tried to find an answer to my question, but it seems that you need answers to very specific questions in order to help. I guess every tank is different, so here goes.

I set up my tank, a juwel rio 125 on 1st April. I added stuff to de-chlorinate the water and some anti-stress/liquid bacteria stuff as per the instructions on the bottle. I left it for a week before adding 8 zebra danios. Water temperature is approx 24oC and the pH is roughly 7.

I have been testing the water daily since I added the fish. I use a liquid test kit (not the strips). All readings are zero, although there could be a very slight trace of ammonia. Itís not really showing as dark as the first colour on the chart which is 0.6mg/l. The water in my tank was cloudy for a couple of days in the beginning but is very clear now.


The fish looked healthy enough and were active (but itís hard to tell with fish, I suppose). Unfortunately I lost two of them out of the blue. I found one trapped inside the filter, but I cannot find the other one. This happened about a week ago and the others seem to be ok.

Iím not sure if the fish swam into the filter during a water/filter change.
I have changed the top filter each week and the black filter yesterday (after one month). I have replaced approx 15l of water on two occasions.


With six fish in the tank (and probably a little corpse somewhere), I would have thought I would have seen a rise in ammonia, but still nothing.

Can anyone tell me why my tank isnít cycling yet? Is it just a case of waiting until it eventually happens or am I doing something wrong?


p.s. I donít know anyone with an established tank

hey welcome to AA check out this link since your doing fish in cycling. theres nothing wrong with fish in cycling!
Fish-in Cycling: Step over into the dark side.
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Old 04-29-2012, 05:20 PM   #3
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im sure other ppl will chime in as well!
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Old 04-29-2012, 07:00 PM   #4
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Cycling a Tank w/ Fish

Hello N...

Cycling a tank with fish is the traditional method and if done right, the fish will be fine. Here are the basics: You get 6 or 8 hardy fish, a few more if you have a large tank. Zebra Danios or Platys, if you like "Livebearers". The fish waste starts the cycle. Get out your handy water test kit and test for ammonia and nitrites every day. When you have a positive test for one of these pollutants, you remove and replace 25 percent of the water.

The water change brings the tank water chemistry back into the "safe zone", so the fish don't get sick. You get rid of the pollution in the tank. So, you test every day for ammonia and nitrites. When you have a positive test, change the water.

Eventually, you'll get several tests that show 0 (zero) ammonia and nitrites. This means good bacteria is growing and turning the pollution into nitrates. These are much less harmful to your fish. So, add a few more fish and keep testing the water daily until the tank is fully stocked.

After your tank is stocked, you should change half the tank water every week. This way, there's no time for pollutants to build up and the fish are always healthy.

You can also add some easy to grow plants during the water change. When the water level in the tank is lower, it makes planting a little easier. The plants will use the fish waste for food and return oxygen to the water for the benefit of the fish.

Pretty simple.

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Old 04-30-2012, 10:04 AM   #5
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What test kit are you using (you mentioned liquid, but what brand)?

Your tank is about 33 US gallons or 27 UK gallons, so a good size, still after a month with fish you should be seeing some readings. I'd stop changing out the filter media, for one. The only time you need to change it out is when it starts literally falling apart and even then you only change one portion at a time. By changing it out so often you aren't allowing the bacteria to settle on the filter. Also does the filter have carbon in it?

Also two 4 gal (15l) water changes over a one month period isn't much. The water contains minerals that the fish (and bacteria) need so these should be replenished regularly. A 30-50% water change weekly is a good maintenance routine (more often, of course, when you start seeing ammonia and/or nitrite).

Are you using tap water? Does the dechlorinator say it detoxifies heavy metals, chlorine and chloramines? If not, it's possible that the dechlorinator isn't neutralizing something in your water which is inhibiting the bacteria.

You mentioned the PH is 7. Have you tested the PH of your tap water? Test it out of the tap and then let it sit in a container or glass for 24 hours and test again; this will be your true PH and what your tank's PH should be. It's possible that your natural PH is higher than 7 and over the course of the month without regular water changes and fish/bacteria using up buffers in the water that the PH fell which might have stunned the bacteria.

Also do you have an air stone in the tank or sufficient surface agitation from the water fall from the filter? Bacteria like oxygen.
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:17 AM   #6
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Thanks for all the replies.
i am using a Nutrafin test kit and the Nutrafin Aqua+ that I'm using does claim to neutralise heavy metals. I do have a carbon filter, which I changed once after 4 weeks. I also changed the top filter layer (white) weekly as recommended by Juwel. There are several other filters in the stack, none of which have been changed yet.

I'm not sure what the pH of my tap water is after 24 hours, but I guess it's easy enough to check, so I'll do that.

Just noticed that the other stuff I added, Nutrafin Cycle claims to eliminate ammonia and nitrite. Perhaps that's the problem?

I just wasn't sure about water changes. I've read loads about it, but there's so much conflicting information. I was only going to change the water if i was able to detect ammonia, hence only two changes, but if it's necessary to do more changes, i will
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Old 04-30-2012, 11:15 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by N3PTUN3
Thanks for all the replies.
i am using a Nutrafin test kit and the Nutrafin Aqua+ that I'm using does claim to neutralise heavy metals. I do have a carbon filter, which I changed once after 4 weeks. I also changed the top filter layer (white) weekly as recommended by Juwel. There are several other filters in the stack, none of which have been changed yet.

I'm not sure what the pH of my tap water is after 24 hours, but I guess it's easy enough to check, so I'll do that.

I just wasn't sure about water changes. I've read loads about it, but there's so much conflicting information. I was only going to change the water if i was able to detect ammonia, hence only two changes, but if it's necessary to do more changes, i will
I think you dont really need to change the filter so much. unless its falling apart. I usually rinse it out really good in old tank water during water changes cause there is a good porsion of good bacteria on those filters.
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Old 04-30-2012, 11:38 AM   #8
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Changing Filter Media

Hello again N...

Don't feel you have to keep the filter media until it's falling apart. You can change out the pads, bags, etc. more often if you have a well stocked and well planted tank. Changing the media regularly does cost a little more, but replacing used media regularly helps keep the water clearer and cleaner.

I change about half the media in my filters weekly with no problems. Just rinse the new stuff in a bucket of your old water change water. Even if you throw away half the filter media, the good bacteria will divide and double it's population in just a few hours. Just don't throw all of it away at once.

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Old 04-30-2012, 12:33 PM   #9
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im sorry I didnt mean literaly falling apart, lol. I mean just rinse it good until you think its timw to chang it. my bad lpl
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:34 PM   #10
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Hello again N...

Don't feel you have to keep the filter media until it's falling apart. You can change out the pads, bags, etc. more often if you have a well stocked and well planted tank. Changing the media regularly does cost a little more, but replacing used media regularly helps keep the water clearer and cleaner.

I change about half the media in my filters weekly with no problems. Just rinse the new stuff in a bucket of your old water change water. Even if you throw away half the filter media, the good bacteria will divide and double it's population in just a few hours. Just don't throw all of it away at once.

B
+1 theres many ways to go about it. I should say
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