Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater & Reef - Sick Fish or Coral
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 01-23-2005, 03:34 PM   #11
steve-s
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
FW dips rarely have much effect on most parasites but if you decide to do so, be extremely careful to match pH and temp. Improperly performed, a dip can be lethal. Also be sure to add a few drops of Methylene Blue. Personally I wouldn't and I think your jumping the gun at this point.

I would first determine if it is C. irritans or possibley A. ocellatum. If so, you'll need to quarantine all your fish, treat accordingly with hyposalinity or copper depending on the parasite while leaving the main tank fallow for 6-8 weeks.

If the tell tale spots of C. irritans do not show up again, it was most likely sediment cause in the slime coat. In which it's most likely bacterial or a simple abbrasion from aggressive behavior. It will most times be easily cleared up with a few good water changes using well aged/aerated SW.

Cheers
Steve
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2005, 04:52 PM   #12
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
There are meds that are specific for reefs and are safe for the inverts and coral.

No need to flush a fish for doing what comes natural. If it were terminally ill, you still don't want to flush it cause it may clog the pipes. If anything, you can always take the fish back to the store.

You need to dechlorinate the FW for the dip and try to make the water as close to the tank temp as possible. After the dip they can go straight back into the tank or if you do find a load of parasites coming off of any of them, you need to keep them out of the main tank. With such a large investment as a 72 gallon reef, it would be worth the money to go out and get a 10 gallon tank, a heater and a sponge filter to use as an isolation/hospital tank.

Using quick cure and any other chemically based meds in a reef tank will eventually kill the reef...the inverts and coral. I would suggest a full water change and fresh carbon and/or a poly filter insert. In fact, you may need to change out the substrate because some medicines can absorb right into it and a thousand water changes will not make much of a diference. Copper is one of those that stay in the substrate.

BTW...How are the corals doing?
__________________

__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2005, 05:07 PM   #13
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
For Steve S

I wish I can remember the name of this particular parasite, but FW dips is the ONLY thing that kills it. Not copper, Not formalin, no medicine has been found to kill these parasites except FW. It's a parasite that has become very problematic in the aquarium industry. They are round and transparent and an accumulation can show in the eyes as cloudiness. We dip our fish routinely to keep these parasites from entering someone else's tank and a preventative to keep our tanks free of these parasites. Many of the fish are dipped before they come into the store.

Though I can't remember the name of the paraiste I do remember the history of it. The parasite at one point in time were isolated to Lumberjack fish, until Japanese fishing fleets carried these fish all over the world and the parasite is found everywhere now. I see these parasites commonly on Angels and butterfly fish, though they infect several others.

We use to do 5 minute FW dips, but some of the fish can't handle it for that long and wrasses don't take to it at all, even for 3 minutes. Though the angels are tough and can handle a 5 minute FW dip if it's needed. Sometimes we'll dip a second time in a day or two so not to stress the fish even more. Without the FW dips, these parasites would kill the fish. Unlike most parasites that do not kill their host, this one does. I'll search for some web info on this parasite. Once I find it, I'll post a link.
__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2005, 06:54 PM   #14
steve-s
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCTFish
There are meds that are specific for reefs and are safe for the inverts and coral.
Unfortunately these do not work with any consistancey. "Reef safe" medications are truely not strong enough to erradicate parasites properly. If they where 100% effective, they would not be reef safe.

When treating a parasite, the only 100% effective means are to remove all fish to quarantine, treat and fallow the main.

Quote:
For Steve S

I wish I can remember the name of this particular parasite, but FW dips is the ONLY thing that kills it. Not copper, Not formalin, no medicine has been found to kill these parasites except FW.
I wish you could too, as for the "Lumberjack" fish, never heard of one

Cheers
Steve
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2005, 08:54 PM   #15
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
Steve,

I'm looking. I e mailed the magazine I saw the article in. Maybe they can help, though the article was published 2 or 3 years ago...hahaha...what kind of luck you'd think I have on that one???...lol. Anyway, I also remember they are a species of monogenae trematode.

I'll find the name eventually. ::ff on quest:::
__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2005, 11:42 AM   #16
steve-s
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
A Monogenea trematode is a type of "fluke". Some will definately let go in a FW dip but the best med is usually Formalin dips.

Cheers
Steve
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2005, 12:26 PM   #17
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
Both are actually recommended. A FW dip then a treatment with formalin. I think the formalin is more for any diseases that can be transmitted from the parasites. Protazoan diseases are hard to treat without getting rid of the parasites that causes them, so the two together make a more effective treatment. Granted FW dips are stressful, but the parasites pose more of a danger. It becomes a "do or die" situation.

I'm still searching for the name of that particular parasite. If I do find the article, that's even better so everyone can become familiar with it. They really have become a problem in the aquarium trade. Not everyone who sells marine fish practice any prevention measures from passing on these parasites. Being these parasites are practically invisable, some of the mysterious deaths of marine fish may in fact be the result of this parasite. It wouldn't surprise me.
__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2005, 12:49 PM   #18
steve-s
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCTFish
Both are actually recommended. A FW dip then a treatment with formalin. I think the formalin is more for any diseases that can be transmitted from the parasites. Protazoan diseases are hard to treat without getting rid of the parasites that causes them, so the two together make a more effective treatment. Granted FW dips are stressful, but the parasites pose more of a danger. It becomes a "do or die" situation.
I strongly disagree. If done correctly, a series of Formalin dips are all that is needed. FW dips are redundant and only add to further stressing an already stressed fish.

Protazoans are not a disease rather a parasite group unto themselves. They do not transfer anything to the host in terms of "disease" but can cause a multitude of secondary infections.

Quote:
I'm still searching for the name of that particular parasite. If I do find the article, that's even better so everyone can become familiar with it. They really have become a problem in the aquarium trade. Not everyone who sells marine fish practice any prevention measures from passing on these parasites. Being these parasites are practically invisable, some of the mysterious deaths of marine fish may in fact be the result of this parasite. It wouldn't surprise me.
Love to see it if you find it. Please do post the link when/if available.

FWIW, most "mysterious" fish deaths are typically the result of improper acclimation and/or cyanide poisoning from collection.

Cheers
Steve
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2005, 04:25 PM   #19
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 1,538
I know most mysterious deaths are due to acclimation for the most part...on a consumer level. I did say some, not most. On the retail end, given the people in charge of the livestock, parasites and aggression are almost always a culprit. On the wholesale end of losses is usually due to transport. I find it amazing what these animals go through and survive.

Fortunately the areas where we get our marine livestock do not use cyanide methods. How ironic that the areas where explosives and cyanide are commonly used was interrupted by a tsunami. A blessing in disguise??? Hope I don't get hounded for that comment...LOL.
__________________

__________________
http://www.tricitytropicals.com
------------------------------------
We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
TCTFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
ick

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ICH ICK and more ICK DJLiquid Saltwater & Reef - Sick Fish or Coral 9 11-10-2008 10:04 PM
ICK!!!!!!!!!!!!MORE ICK!!!!!!!!!!!!I'm desperate here!!!! ADCISCO Freshwater & Brackish - Unhealthy Fish 14 11-16-2003 02:56 PM
What is ick? HalfAmazing Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started 1 10-27-2003 03:24 PM
Rid ick (+) or nox ick? jhd Freshwater & Brackish - Unhealthy Fish 1 10-26-2003 12:41 PM
ick leesanhua Freshwater & Brackish - Unhealthy Fish 2 10-21-2003 02:00 PM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.