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Old 12-06-2003, 08:20 PM   #1
hok
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Need nitrifying bacteria for cool saltwater

As far as I know, saltwater nitrifying bacteria are Nitrosococcus and Nitrococcus. As Nitrosococcus will convert ammonia (NH3 + NH4+) to nitrite (NO2-), then Nitrococcus will convert nitrite (NO2-) to Nitrate (NO3-). However, their optimal temperature range is between 77 and 86 degrees Fahrenheit.

I am looking for saltwater nitrifying bacteria have optimal temperature range between 52 and 62 degrees Fahrenheit. Can anyone let me know the names of bacteria as well as where I can buy them? Thank you in advance for any pointer.
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Old 12-06-2003, 09:39 PM   #2
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I don't have the answer, but if no one else here can help I would try Dr. Ron Shimek's forum at Reef Central. He specializes in marine invertebrate science and may be able to give you some answers.

http://reefcentral.com/forums/forumd...?s=&forumid=40
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Old 12-07-2003, 02:16 AM   #3
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If we are talking SW......

The bacteria in a closed system are Nitrosomonas for ammonia and Nitrobacters for nitrites. In a wild setting the Nitrosococcus and Nitrococcus would be the prevelant bacteria but in the types of systems we care for the aforemention two become the dominant. You also do not need to worry about the NH4 unless the ph is kept in a lower range which for SW does not happen. Only the NH3 is relavent.

When setting up a coldwater species tank, you allow the bacteria to colonize and grow at a normal room temp or higher. Once the cycling has completed, you lower the temp slowly over a few weeks at a few degrees each day. The bacteria is the same, it will just work much slower. Since the temp will be lower, there will be much more available O2 that will aid in the oxidization of wastes as well.

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Old 12-07-2003, 03:19 AM   #4
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Thanks for the pointer!

jackdp:

I have just posted my inquiry at http://reefcentral.com/forums/showth...hreadid=280285

Again, thanks for your advise!
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Old 12-07-2003, 03:32 AM   #5
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steve-s:

I thought Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter are for freshwater.
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Old 12-07-2003, 04:05 AM   #6
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Nope... The two you mention are present as well as others but in an "artificial" environment, they will not be the dominant genera.

Filtration Basics.

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