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Old 05-15-2006, 11:10 AM   #1
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New to salt water.. I think I got ick

I think my fish tank has ick.

I have a 40 galon tank that is about 2 months old... this past weekend I lost 3 fish.

I lost my Clown Fish, Camel Shrimp and tiny blue tang.

Currently I have 2 damsels, 1 sea cucumber and 2 large feather dusters.... how do you suggest I treat my tank without more deaths? I do not on a QT. I also have 40pounds of live rock.

Should I raise the temp? Currently 77... if so to what?
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Old 05-15-2006, 11:21 AM   #2
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How old is your tank anyway? Also, you should give up on the idea of having any tangs in a 40g IMO. The one you chose is what some call an "ick magnet" - and coupling that with a very new tank, it was recipe for problems. Check out the "Articles" section above. There should be something there that will give you a better idea of what you're dealing with. Hyposalinity is an option, but you have to have a refractometer.

You will lose the shrimp, dusters, and the cuke once you start messing around with meds or temperature most likely. Cannot use copper (what most use to treat ick) with sand rock, or inverts. On the cucumber anyway, what kind is it? I belive there are some that when they die or get too stressed (e.g., temp adjustments, etc) they can kill everything in your tank if they release their inards (sp?).

What are the readings on your water BTW? Trates, ph, salinity? Have they been fluctuating much?
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Old 05-15-2006, 01:11 PM   #3
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The camel shrimp didn't die from ick. Inverts can't get ick. I think maybe you stocked your tank to fast. You have to go really slow to allow your bacteria to catch up with your bio load. You should only introduce one fish a month. What signs of ick do you have? You can use anything that holds water as a qt. Rubbermaid container maybe? You can't use hypo with inverts. I have ick right now too. I didn't qt a tang cause I didn't have a qt either now I am paying the price double time. i won't make that mistake again!!!!!


Good luck


Tinia
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Old 05-15-2006, 01:24 PM   #4
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ick?

Okay my tank is about 2.5 months old, maybe I did stock it to fast...

I suspect ick because both of my damsel that I have had since week 2 their skin looks very funky.... they have little dots all over that kinda look like air bubles...

My levels have been pretty good, I know my tank cycled I watched it closely... yesterday my Amonia was 0, Nitrites 0, and Nitrates 20...

My PH might have been slightly high, the color was hard to determine from the test strip.. how do you control PH in a salt water tank?

I'm not 100% sure what tpe of cucumber I got, its purple/pink? That and the feather duster appear to be healthy...

One more thing, I suspect ick cause I noticed my clown fish starting to gasp for air the past few days.
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Old 05-15-2006, 01:38 PM   #5
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My fish never gasped for air but I think they can. Mine really just flashed alot and the white spots look like salt. They were always worse in the morning. Can you post a pic? We all make mistakes in this hobby. Mine, not qt All Fish. Now i am paying the price!!!!
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Old 05-15-2006, 02:39 PM   #6
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Quote:
how do you control PH in a salt water tank?
Gas exchange, PHs. Hopefully one of the more experienced folks can explain PH a little better....
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Old 05-15-2006, 03:16 PM   #7
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I really don't know alot about ph either but I do know that if it isn't stable it can kill your fish. Maybe you can search the forum by putting in ph levels
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Old 05-15-2006, 03:23 PM   #8
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Found this on the net..... seems like more about freshwater, but still interesting...

The term pH stands for the Power of Hydrogen & is defined as the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion concentration. In other words, pH is a measure of the amount of hydrogen ions in your water.

The pH scale runs from 0.0 to 14.0. Values less then 7.0 are acidic, 7.0 is neutral, & values greater than 7.0 are basic. ( basic has formerly been referred to as alkalinity. Alkalinity is a measure of the buffering capacity of water.) Because pH is a logarithmic function, a change in pH from 6.0 to 7.0 would represent a ten-fold decrease in the hydrogen ion concentration; 6.0 to 8.0 would be a 100-fold decrease. In other terms a pH of 6.0 is 100 times more acidic than a pH of 8.0.

pH in the aquarium is an important factor. Not only do fish require a certain "safe" range to survive, but pH is an important controlling factor for many chemical balances, including the ratio of nontoxic ammonium ion (NH4 +) to toxic ammonia (NH3), & between the toxic nitrite ion (NO2 ¯ ) & very toxic nitrous acid (HNO2).

For most species of fish, the pH in a freshwater aquarium should be between 6.5 & 7.8. At pH levels below 6.5, the growth & survival of nitrifying bacteria becomes reduced & possibly ceased. If pH levels below 6.5 are to be used (specialized cases only, i.e. breeding dwarf cichlids) frequent water changes are vital to prevent the accumulation of nitrogenous wastes (ammonia).

Correcting low pH The following methods may be used to correct low pH.

A water change will replenish the natural buffers, from your water supply, unless they are normally low to start, in which case the pH may revert to low levels in a few days. If low pH is a recurring problem, the water can be buffered using commercially available buffers preset to various pH values, usually between 6.5 & 7.5. If such buffers are used, they must be used in sufficient amounts to hold the pH at the desired level until the next water change. The amount of buffer to add can be determined by trial & error. Adding more buffer does not significantly change the pH, but only extends the time that the pH of the water will be held at the desired level. Generally, in soft-water areas where acid rain is a problem, buffers should be added with every water change.

Dolomitic limestone, coral gravel, or oyster shell can be incorporated into an outside filter or an inside corner filter. Ammonia absorbers also buffer freshwater to approximately pH of 7.5. The amount used must be by trial & error. With time, the natural carbonates from these natural elements will become exhausted, & fresh materials may be required. Be sure to monitor the results, otherwise the pH may become too high.

Sodium bicarbonate is another pH adjuster, but not a buffer. If added in excess to the water, the pH can be elevated to unacceptable high levels. Gradually add small amounts with frequent testing of the pH. Because it's not a buffer, the level may not hold for long.

Correcting high pH

High pH water which is usually hard, high in alkalinity & well buffered, usually requires removing of some of that natural hardness & alkalinity. Mixing softened with unsoftened water could result in water with a desired pH. This must be done by trial & error.

Softening the water with commercial water softeners, which remove calcium & magnesium ions by an exchange process with sodium ions, will also help to reduce pH.

Commercially available buffers are very effective in soft-water areas but not effective for decreasing pH in very hard water. However, after the water is softened, buffers can be added to adjust pH.
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Old 05-15-2006, 05:27 PM   #9
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LOL, thanks Austinsdad! I was trying to read that at work, but kept getting phone calls. Now that I had a chance to read, it was very informative.
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