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Old 03-23-2006, 12:08 AM   #11
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Won't this impact my other inhabitants? I'm guessing fish, not so much , but I have other corals and inverts in my tank.

The 'impact' is a positive one. Generally it's 77 degrees, but I don't think that's an option on the heater as 76 degrees is. You could set it for 78 degrees, but depending on where you live and the current climate, you may opt for a lower temp. to control the lower end of the temp. 80 Degrees IMO is too close to the higher end of the temp. limit. Then again I live in Southern California and temp is a common concern here among aquarists especially with reefs. Chillers seem to be a requirement here for tanks over 50 gallons to control the higher end of temp limits. Here's some info. on temperatures for marine. It includes sort of a comparison between temps in the ocean and temps in a closed system (an aquarium). Pretty interesting.

http://tricitytropicals.com/index.as...on=Custom&ID=1
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We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
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Old 03-23-2006, 10:11 AM   #12
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I took your advice and picked up a bottle of ReefDip at the LFS last night. When I got home I did a dip for about 15 minutes in a small 1 gallon container. At that time, all of the polyps had retracted. I snipped the pieces of the inner skeleton that had been exposed due to the flesh deteriorating. This was only in the areas near the tips. I did not clip near the base as I didn't have any epoxy to reglue to the rock. I placed it back in the tank. on the bottom in an area with good, indirect flow.

This morning, after the lights came up, there was still many polyps that extended, but they are still brown. So at least it is not completely dead.

Thanks for the read on water quality. I'll be sure to read it. I'm in PA, and my tank is in my finished basement. Temp stays very constant down there, so I don't really have a need for a chiller. In fact the room temp is a fairly constant 72 degrees.

I checked alkalinity and it was 4.23 meq/l, roughly 11 dkh, IIRC, which seems to be appropriate. PH was low, and I attribute that to a large water change I did (after the gorg was having trouble). I added a buffer to bring it up a little. It was at 8.2 when I checked this morning.
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Old 03-23-2006, 03:43 PM   #13
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The reef dip gives the coral a complexed layer of slime to keep bacteria out allowing for the flesh to heal. It's like a 'medicated' band aid. The coral is still left on it's own to heal. Now all you can do is wait.

Snipped pieces can be planted right into the substrate instead of glued onto a rock. They can be glued later if and when the pieces heal. If they do, you'll be growing a few pieces of the coral.

That's one way to propagate most soft and SPS coral...is to cut them. You can take a mushroom, cut it into four pieces...may three or just two.... and they will heal and grow into individuals. Colts and tree corals can be propagated by tying a thin string...preferrably sewing thread, around the base of a branch. It will eventually fall off. That piece is now a individual. Leathers, carnations, mushrooms, polyps, acropora, montipora, elephant coral, xenia, etc. can all be cut to make more.

The alkalinity is slightly high, though not by much. Alk levels should be between 2.5 and 4. Yours is at 4.23, so if you are adding any alkalinity additives, you may want to stop until the system shows it needs more. Calcium you mentioned is at 400. That's actually slightly low, but no biggie to the soft coral. 450 is the typical calcium level. You can continue adding a calcium suppliment until you reach 450. Sooner or later, you'll learn your tank as time goes on what it needs when. It's still new yet.

For future reference, whenever pH is low, check ammonia levels PRIOR to buffering pH. This is quite important because pH will naturally lower in the presence of ammonia to keep the toxin in a non toxic form called ammonium. Ammonia levels should be tended to first to avoid poisoning the livestock if ammonia is present.

I checked out your little photo gallery. Nice tank set up. I like the rock formation you got going there. I do have one comment...cover the power head intake with a prefilter. It will help protect the impeller from debris and can serve as a mechanical filter as well. Just rinse the sponge of the prefilter every so often to clean off debris. Needless to worry about any bio on it because of all the live rock.

I have a FujiFilm FinePix S7000 fully digital, yet can be fully manual too. The listed megapixel capacity is 6.2, but does have the ability to take 12 MP photos, which is excellent for those super macro shots. Even after a couple of years, I'm still learning the camera...LOL. Lots of little buttons and duhiggies, bells and whistles, whatever. I typically keep it set on a partial automatic setting. I'm putting together another gallery. I'll send you link once it's set up. I do a lot of computer graphics and make all sorts of things out of the photos I take. Got tons of aquarium photos of all sorts of fish and inverts. Over 10 gigs of aquarium photos alone. I like taking pictures

Please keep me updated and good luck. I've had very little success in healing gorgonias. It's like, most of the time when they get like that they don't seem to fully recover. Can only hope for the best. When populating a tank with coral, start with the easy mushrooms and polyps. As the tank matures, so many months down the line, then try another one, but do wait. Let the system grow and balance out first.

I use to go into PA long time ago. My mom's then boyfriend had some friends up in New Milford with a good portion of land. Beautiful up there especially during the fall when all the leaves on the trees are just a rainbow of color. I grew up in NJ for 22 years and once in a while we'd take a trip to Pensy to stay at their place. Next door neighbors were at least a quarter to half a mile down the road...LOL. I like that Neighbors can be ruly and it wouldn't matter!!
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We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
Nov/2004
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Old 03-23-2006, 04:24 PM   #14
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I had been checking ammonia as well as other tests and the ammonia has always been at zero. I'm pretty sure that's not the problem.

I have an additional 40 lbs of live rock that I will be adding to the tank in the next week. After I moved from th 60g hex to the 75g I really needed more rock to aquascape with. I'll be adding it to the right side of the tank to raise the whole structure up like the left. My intention was to take the basic lagoon type rock design and have one at each end of the tank. Looking down from above it looks like a big number three. It adds some depth to the structure when looking from the front of the tank and it avoids that "pile" look that I see so often when people just stack the rock against the back glass. To each his own. I like it this way.

I've changed powerheads in the past week or so and they have prefilters on them. I can see they will need to be cleaned often. Eventually I will build a nice closed loop.
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Old 03-24-2006, 07:55 PM   #15
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If the coral actually survives the dip process, do not place it in the sand. Gorgonians do not slime, they form a waxy build up when they are in distress. The more the coral is stressed, the worse it will get. You end up plugging the coral up.

In the center of the gorg, there will be a thin reedy stalk similar to what a wooden pencil will look like if you cut it lengthwise. Trim off the dead/necrosing area until you get down to that core. Try to do so without breaking it, you will need that to resecure the gorg to something else. Placing it in the sand will just smother it and start the necrosis all over again. Use a coral plug or something else that can be drilled with a dremel just large enough so the newly cleaned stalk can be inserted. Once ready, fill the plug with superglue gel and slide in the core portion of the gorg. This will leave the healthy tissue free from the substrate or other irritants and can be placed in a good water flow area. They need decent flow to help remove/prevent the waxy build up on their tissues. Make sure it is not laminar flow though.

Here is a step by step guide that may help...
http://garf.org/100/gorg/GORG1.html

Since this coral is a filter feeder, you will also need to ensure it gets well fed. Phytoplankton and DT's oyster eggs being your best bet. You might also try Reef Roids but I think that will be too large.

What scleractinians do you have that are a concern in the way of Ca?

Cheers
Steve
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