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Old 01-17-2004, 12:06 AM   #1
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Why is there white patches.

Do anyone knows why is there white patches on my clownfish skin? Last time my false percular have that, now my tomato clown also had it, I'm certain that its not white spot, hope that its not any skin problem. My water parameter is alright. The white patches is not white actually, its a lighter colour of the particular fish, like for tomato clown, its brighter orange, but split into two patches at the side of its skin.
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Old 01-17-2004, 12:31 AM   #2
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If the ocellaris had the same condition then it could be brooklynella hostillis. Especially if the new clown is in the same tank as the last one without a proper fallow period. Does the clown also have labored breathing and/or excess body slime?

Best action would be treating with hyposalinity ASAP if it is brook. You may also need to treat with an anti-biotic if the skin irritation becomes infected.

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Old 01-17-2004, 03:05 AM   #3
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No, the tomato clown doesn't seems difficulty in breathing, its swimming happily and eating happily. My yellow damsel kept dashing at both the tomato ( small in size ) and my false percular, I think my percular skin is due to the nipping, do you think that is possible? I had already removed the percular clown to another tank, the damsel I also removed from the main tank, now all fishes are peaceful, do you think I can leave the clown fish as it is and let it recover on its own? All fishes in the tank had no ich sign, and I fed them with garlic extract soaked food, and I also drip 1 drop per 10 gal of water. Now then I think of it, do you think its the garlic extract that causes the clown to have that symtoms? I soak with the correct amount, 1 drop per tea spoon of food.
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Old 01-17-2004, 06:01 AM   #4
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Sorry to disagree, but hyposalinity won't do much for brooklynella. You may find my article about using formalin helpful. http://petsforum.com/cis-fishnet/seascope/99SS1601.htm
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Old 01-17-2004, 08:01 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by October 2002 [i
Aquarium Fish Magazine[/i] Article by Scott Michael]
Anemone Fish Disease
This ciliated protozoa. known as Brooklynella hostilis, infects both the gills and skin of fish. Two of the most diagnostic symptoms of this infection are the sloughing of protective skin cells and increased secretion of mucus. The infected fish may also I become lethargic, exhibit respiratory distress, stop feeding and display areas of discolored skin on the body.
Like Uronema, this parasite feeds on the tissue and blood of its host, and causes osmoregulatory distress as it opens portals for the loss of body water to the marine environment. The gill tissue can also be damaged by the parasite's feeding activity. Unlike Uronema, anemonefish disease must have a host to survive.
Brooklynella usually becomes apparent when fish are experiencing unusual amounts of stress. For example, it is often seen in young anemonefish that are crowded in wholesale facilities or retail stores. It gets its name from the fact that it regularly infects anemonefish, but it will parasitize other fish species, as well (e.g., it is a common seahorse parasite).
One of the most commonly employed treatments for Brookiynella is to use a combination of formalin and malachite green. However, care should be taken with fish that have severe skin damage, as this will make them more sensitive to formalin treatment (it could poison them). Malachite green can be used on its own at a concentration of 0.10 part per million (ppm) (Blasiola, 1992). Once again, the best treatment option is to lower the saliniity. This will eradicate the parasite and help reduce osmoregulatory distress in your fish. Note that copper is not an effective treatment for this parasite.
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Old 01-17-2004, 04:18 PM   #6
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I winced a bit when I first read this article. He also said hyposalinity will cure Uronema. As you probably know by now, I am a huge advocate of hyposalinity therapy. However, it is not a cure for everything. I have yet to see any evidence in the scientific journals to support hyposalinity as a cure for either of these parasites. I looked for support in Scott’s references at the end of his article and I did not find anything that would support this notion among his references. IMO, Scott knows a great deal about the various species of fish and their husbandry. However, marine fish disease is a very specialized and very few people are truly knowledgeable in this area. Formalin dips is the only treatment recommended for brooklynella by some leading aquatic medicine specialist, most notably Dr. Edward J. Noga. Dr Noga is the author of the best fish disease book available and he is the professor of aquatic medicine at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine.
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Old 01-17-2004, 07:42 PM   #7
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When I worked at the LFS, we used to quarantine all new WC clowns in formalin and nitrafurizone, after losing LOTS of clowns to brooklynella, after implementing that practice we hade almost no brooklynella outbreaks on our new clowns. We did have limited success treating brooklynella on one batch of clowns using this combo, where formalin alone had failed, most likely it wasn't caught in time. If you search back you would see that is what I would recommend, until I read that article.
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Old 01-17-2004, 10:31 PM   #8
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Then what should I do? There are so many different answers and doubts. Should I just leave it as it is? Will it recover? Or it will be more worst? If I remove the tomato from the tank, will my another false percular got the symtoms too? It do not have it now.
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Old 01-18-2004, 04:56 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by reefrunner69
If you search back you would see that is what I would recommend, until I read that article.
I wonder where I got the idea from.. LOL but we all live, learn and move forward. :P

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Old 01-18-2004, 05:05 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by mansiz
Then what should I do? There are so many different answers and doubts. Should I just leave it as it is? Will it recover? Or it will be more worst? If I remove the tomato from the tank, will my another false percular got the symtoms too? It do not have it now.
I think it would help if we all had a clear idea of how these fish are housed and how many. By your posts, it sounds as if you have 3 clowns in the same tank? How many total fish are/where in this tank?

The description you gave does not narrow the problem down to brooklynella but does make it a possibility. The damsel fish aggression could also be causing skin irritations resulting in a bacterial or fungal infection. Misdiagnosis of a problem and futher misdirected treatment can cause just as much a problem as the injury itself.

Any chance you would be able to post a pic?

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