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Old 03-14-2003, 07:38 PM   #1
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New clark has some white film

I recently purchased a Clarks Clownfish from an online dealer. The fish was/is beautiful It took the anemone I had as a host almost immediately, fed right away, basically looked right at home. Well about 10 days later (as a matter of convenience the fish decided to wait untill after the seven day guarantee) I noticed he lost his appetite, and started developing this filmy looking slime, it almost appeared as maybe the fish got scraped against the LR. It has been two days since I first noticed and the condition looks worse, more white stuff, less appetite, and his mouth just gapes open as he stares aimlessly around. Can any one help w/what I have described thus far? This pic doesnt really do it justice because it is more prominent than shown, my camera didnt pick it up good.
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Old 03-14-2003, 07:45 PM   #2
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http://www.aquariumadvice.com/viewto...t=brooklynella

Check out the thread above. I can't really see from the pic.........but it sounds like brooklynella hostillis.
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Old 03-14-2003, 08:25 PM   #3
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Here's a quote from Bob Fenner from WWM:
Quote:
Cryptocaryon irritans is the causative agent for marine ich, or white spot disease. It is a ciliated protozoan, named for it's many small cilia utilized for locomotion. We'll include in it's discussion two other ciliate protozoans, Brooklynella hostilis, so called anemonefish disease (though it infects all marine bony fishes), and Uronema marinum (uronema). All three organisms produce similar observable signs, are deadly, spreadable, and cured and prevented through about the same means. is the causative agent for marine ich, or white spot disease. It is a ciliated protozoan, named for it's many small cilia utilized for locomotion. We'll include in it's discussion two other ciliate protozoans, brooklynella hostilis, so called anemonefish disease (though it infects all marine bony fishes), and Uronema marinum (uronema). All three organisms produce similar observable signs, are deadly, spreadable, and cured and prevented through about the same means. The rapid production of mucus showing up as clumps are close to the last clue you'll get before your fishes breakdown with rapid then lethargic breathing. Uronema may reveal itself in ulcerations that look like lesions.

Pulled from the RL board.
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Old 03-14-2003, 10:29 PM   #4
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So which treatment do you recomend, either the lower the salinity one or formalite with malachite green? My tank is 55gal w/a yellow tang, 2green chromis 1 blue chromis, a dwarf lionfish, a tomato clown and a clark clown, a reef lobster, and an anemone. I have got about 50lbs LR. Are any of those treatments harmful to what I have listed? Also thanks for the quick reply before! One more thing if there are no signs on the other fish in the aquarium that this disease has spread to them, would it be wise to remove the clark clown to salvage the rest of the tank?
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Old 03-14-2003, 10:35 PM   #5
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The safest is probably the lowered salinity, not sure whether either will be effective. I have not seen anyone have any luck whatsoever with brooklynella. It is technically contagious to other fish, but I have never seen it spread beyond clownfish. Not much help I know, I suppose I would try the hyposalinity.
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Old 03-15-2003, 12:37 AM   #6
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I wouldn't try the hypo in the main tank though! Kevin means do it in a hospital tank. Here is a link to one method of hyposalinity treatment of parasites. http://www.pufferlovers.com/modules....thread&tid=230
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