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Old 02-23-2016, 06:06 AM   #71
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I'd stick the LED's back on and notch the bps up a touch. I don't see the point in scrimping on light when the plants are telling you everything you need to know. Are the plants healthy still up until a foot before they take off?


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Old 02-23-2016, 10:03 AM   #72
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I'd stick the LED's back on and notch the bps up a touch. I don't see the point in scrimping on light when the plants are telling you everything you need to know. Are the plants healthy still up until a foot before they take off?


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Ok, thanks I'll do that.

They look ok'ish. A little GSA algae but not covered in BBA that I used to get.
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Old 02-23-2016, 01:52 PM   #73
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What's you lighting and co2 schedule?


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Old 02-23-2016, 07:27 PM   #74
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I had a proper look at timers and use a split period with:

Morning:
Lights 3.5 hours.
CO2 4.5 hours (comes on roughly an hour and a quarter before hand). Switches off a little before lights.

Night:
Lights 4.5 hours.
CO2 6 hours. Same deal on timing.

I'm told a ph probe lasts up to 18 months after which ph reads low so I'm hoping to re/check that the probe is still accurate this weekend and see if ph drops consistently. Might chart by hour and check if it does switch off.

Usually I just have the ph switch-off setting at a really low ph now as I've never noticed fish problems with too much co2. So just run co2 non-stop when on but also need to check.

Probe sits at other end of tank near surface so guess there would be 5ft between reactor and probe.

The internal filter is pretty much on all the time (except for an hour for feeding) to push water around. Canister filters switch off part of the time only so I could chart that and see if ph drops better with canister filters on or off.

Water flow has I think improved now the ornaments are all in middle of tank but that might be just my imagination as well.
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Old 02-24-2016, 03:25 AM   #75
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Can you raise the LED light unit up off of the tank some to decrease PAR? 300 wow!
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Old 02-24-2016, 04:03 AM   #76
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Dela I would drop the siesta. There is really no evidence that this helps. In fact it could actually be more problematic for plants because of the efficiency of the rubisco enzyme. It's probably the most abundant enzyme on earth yet it is really inefficient and slow, especially slow to startup meaning it could be counterproductive for the plants to keep having to startup this process for a shorter yield. In the dark, competitive inhibiting compounds bind to the rubisco activation sites in leaves and before the plant can photosynthesise rubisco has to remove these inhibitors which costs time and energy.

Also I would try making sure the drop checker is green to lime AT lights on so the the plants have access to adequate amounts of carbon straight off the bat. I think this will improve your situation.


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Old 02-24-2016, 09:57 AM   #77
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Can you raise the LED light unit up off of the tank some to decrease PAR? 300 wow!
Just looking at that as well. Since one reef light died, I have one remaining box reef light for white light and also the other box hydroponics light that is basically red light.

I can't hang off ceiling either of these (read: not allowed ) so trying to think of something that the box leds can sit on to get some height.

Part of the reason for going back to T5's was to get a strip light and one consistent lighting colour across the tank.

The local aquarium society here has included some semi-decent led strip lights in the door raffles. Winning one of those might solve some problems (if anyone wants air-stones I have a few though ).
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Old 02-24-2016, 10:02 AM   #78
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Dela I would drop the siesta. There is really no evidence that this helps. In fact it could actually be more problematic for plants because of the efficiency of the rubisco enzyme. It's probably the most abundant enzyme on earth yet it is really inefficient and slow, especially slow to startup meaning it could be counterproductive for the plants to keep having to startup this process for a shorter yield. In the dark, competitive inhibiting compounds bind to the rubisco activation sites in leaves and before the plant can photosynthesise rubisco has to remove these inhibitors which costs time and energy.

Also I would try making sure the drop checker is green to lime AT lights on so the the plants have access to adequate amounts of carbon straight off the bat. I think this will improve your situation.


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Have wondered on that siesta rule myself. Is that pretty certain?

Just curious. I could easily swap to just a very short lights on in morning to check tank and then the bulk of light on during the afternoon/night. That's very interesting.
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Old 02-24-2016, 11:56 AM   #79
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Have wondered on that siesta rule myself. Is that pretty certain?

Just curious. I could easily swap to just a very short lights on in morning to check tank and then the bulk of light on during the afternoon/night. That's very interesting.

Well it is a tough one really. I think the siesta idea came about for many reasons, most notably for allowing co2 to build up in a non injected tank, which it does. There are many arguments for and against this though with the ultimate answer from what I have read is that there really is no noticeable difference when using a siesta period. This is especially so and even more unnecessary in injected tanks. Plants will happily grow for the full photoperiod given the right conditions.

There are arguments that fluctuating co2 levels can be bad for plants due to the reasons mentioned in the last post about rubisco. Others arguments are that algae need much less co2 than plants and so after a few hours in a non co2 tank conditions become favourable to algae and less favourable to plants so by allowing co2 to replenish plants stand a better chance. Having said that, plants cannot compete with algae for anything so I believe that this is a moot point, it's that fact that plants are healthier with correct levels of co2 that keeps algae at bay. some people believe that algae wait for triggers produced by unhealthy plants to bloom. From my observations when plants are not happy algae tends to follow.

What i found in my Walstad tank was that they were not very healthy environments for fauna, meso-fauna, bacteria etc. The reason is that these tanks lack oxygen, especially when one doesn't have any flow, which sometimes I didn't because my Betta didn't like getting battered around the tank. Interesting calculations show that in still water oxygen takes years to diffuse in to lower depths. In a soil tank with lots of decomposition by bacteria, the oxygen demand is huge. As you may be aware Walstad advises against surface agitation (until recently) as not to allow valuable co2 to escape and so you do not get much oxygen coming in either. If oxygen levels are too low, organisms will not thrive and so net co2 production will also be low. Plants need oxygen too as you know they are not just producers. Allowing good surface agitation provides atmospheric equilibrium levels of oxygen and co2 which maximises bacterial activity and thus co2 production that may be captured upon escaping to atmosphere. Although co2 in equilibrium is indeed low, it is there and it is there all the time. What does this have to do with siesta periods? Well it suggests that these are not needed even in no co2 tanks. Diana herself now advocates good flow and surface agitation as she has observed that this is the reason people trying her method are reporting failure.

Focus on plant health rather than algae. Healthy plants seem to keep algae in check. Why? No one has the definitive answer but there are many viable reasons. We could go in to this more in another thread maybe.


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Old 02-24-2016, 02:53 PM   #80
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I have researched the siesta very throughly and expiriemented with it, and I'm fully in agreement with caliban.

If you injection co2, siesta is not necessary at all as the purpose of the siesta is to build up co2 for a regular tank. The siesta is also a benefit as algae need a long period of light before they begin working, so with the 5 hour on, 4 off, 5 on algae will be minimal....
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