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Old 02-03-2011, 11:39 PM   #11
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I was justing posting the same info for elysekuf. We must have bumped heads as we were typing . When you say turn the ISO all the way down you mean to say "100"? I'm thinking you would want a more light sensitive ISO like 400 or 800.
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:41 PM   #12
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BTW, that last post I made was for Crepe. I guess I better learn to type faster!
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:42 PM   #13
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hah! I'm glad I refreshed before I clicked submit! I almost responded again and we would have been going in circles hehe
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:55 PM   #14
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I use something closer to 30 or 40 ISO. Then again my lights are T5HO and the last picture in my first post is what things look like in my tank at that ISO. A lower ISO in my experience lets you take nicer shots of fish because there's less chance of graininess due to a small aperture, additionally there's less glare and less blurring when the fish move. But I'm not photographer, so that's the extent of my knowledge.
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:59 PM   #15
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WOW!! Good advice across the board, but my thread seems to have gotten sidetracked a bit!!
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Old 02-04-2011, 12:01 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redfisher1139 View Post
WOW!! Good advice across the board, but my thread seems to have gotten sidetracked a bit!!
Sorry about that redfisher. The thing is ALL fish are hard to photograph when you don't have your camera set up right or if you have improper lighting.
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Old 02-04-2011, 12:11 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crepe View Post
I use something closer to 30 or 40 ISO. Then again my lights are T5HO and the last picture in my first post is what things look like in my tank at that ISO. A lower ISO in my experience lets you take nicer shots of fish because there's less chance of graininess due to a small aperture, additionally there's less glare and less blurring when the fish move. But I'm not photographer, so that's the extent of my knowledge.

You are correct that it's better to keep your ISO low and try to balance your aperture and your shutter speed first. Your aperture controls how much light is let in and your shutter for how long. Generally, you want a higher shutter speed if you can because they will result in sharper images. You want a lower/wider aperture if you're photographing people / pets, etc. because then your depth of field is lower, meaning that you're likely only really focusing sharply on one feature (with people, you want to try to set that on their eyes, for example). However, with large groups and/or landscape, you want to have a higher/smaller aperture because that will allow you to have multiple sharp focal points. (And of course, opening your aperture is the easiest, and should be the first thing you do when you try to increase exposure, in my opinion. But watch for the clarity of your image, because after lighting, sharpness is the most important thing.)

However, if your exposure isn't right even when your shutter speed and aperture is where you know is optimal for your shot, you can increase the the ISO, which will come at a cost of grain, however, where grain becomes visible depends on your camera (for me it's around 800-900 before you can even tell). ISO doesn't really affect clarity of the photo all that much unless you're starting to get grainy from going too high.

Definitely, the better lighting you have, the easier this whole process will be.

And sorry for hijacking, redfisher! But as OhNeil said, having your camera set up properly is important, so maybe this will help someone else get a killer photo to add to this thread, too.
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Old 02-06-2011, 04:03 PM   #18
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Defintily my red cherry shrimp because i can never find them
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Old 02-13-2011, 10:53 AM   #19
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Mine would be my leopard danios they are fast!!!
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Old 02-13-2011, 12:44 PM   #20
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my brown tang.. hes just too quick and never sits still
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