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Old 11-07-2014, 05:23 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by 54seaweed View Post
weather you had bought ins or not the shipper is liable just a fyi
it wouldn't be for full value but a pro rated value maybe get $100.or so when its all said and done
each item shipped is covered under the shippers ins up to a certain amount the ins you didn't purchase would have covered the rest
that is true, same with the postal service, but the damage has to be documented at the time of delivery for something like this and at this point the tank has been filled and then altered (siliconed a patch).

The OP should have contacted both the manufacturer and the shipper immediately upon discovering the damage and not have proceeded the way they did.

so now we are at the point of figuring out a way to patch it.

someone mentioned using an acrylic patch, big no, no, silicone doesn't bond to acrylic anywhere near as strongly as it does to glass, the surface is too smooth. It would probably separate even in the best conditions.
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Old 11-07-2014, 05:49 PM   #12
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At this point I would tear down the tank and replace that one (of three) pieces of glass. That's the only insurance that you have against a future break.
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Old 11-12-2014, 11:15 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by PB_Smith View Post

someone mentioned using an acrylic patch, big no, no, silicone doesn't bond to acrylic anywhere near as strongly as it does to glass, the surface is too smooth. It would probably separate even in the best conditions.
What about this?

http://www.amazon.com/Goop-Marine-Ad.../dp/B000LNMVI0

Says plastics and vynil
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Old 11-12-2014, 12:27 PM   #14
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but I doubt it is rated for use in aquariums.
you would be best sticking with glass.
while acrylic is stronger, it is also more flexible and will transmit any flexing forces to the glass and possibly make matters worse in the long run. if you notice acrylic tanks do not have a bottom frame because the bottom plate would sag. Acrylic tanks should always be fully supported across the entire bottom.

you should use glass to patch glass and acrylic to patch acrylic.
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Old 11-12-2014, 05:28 PM   #15
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Use glass with glass.
It won't shatter unless it's tough glass. Tough glass doesn't crack, tough glass shatters.

The hairline crack mentioned may be worth noting.
Is there a void below the tank?

All of my tanks have polystyrene protection on the base panel outside of the tank. So far so good.

As the glass isn't laminated I'd do like somebody else said.
One sheet fixed inside the tank covering the base panel, two pieces with a silicone bead will work if bracing gets in the way.
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:39 PM   #16
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The only way to safely do it is to replace the bottom piece of glass. Anything else carries serious risk of catastrophic failure. 300g of water on your floor will destroy a house; think replacing drywall, flooring, insulation, and possibly even electronics and furniture. Then you have to take into account the loss of livestock. It's not worth the risk to save $200 by trying to patch the bottom of a tank.

Even if the bottom is fully supported, if it flexes at all the bottom would be toast.
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Old 11-13-2014, 02:03 PM   #17
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The only way to safely do it is to replace the bottom piece of glass. Anything else carries serious risk of catastrophic failure. 300g of water on your floor will destroy a house; think replacing drywall, flooring, insulation, and possibly even electronics and furniture. Then you have to take into account the loss of livestock. It's not worth the risk to save $200 by trying to patch the bottom of a tank.

Even if the bottom is fully supported, if it flexes at all the bottom would be toast.
Strongly disagree with this statement!

My first tank I built, I dropped a rock into it which cracked the bottom, I patched it up just like this, when I emptied the tank during a full service there was a beautiful spider web mosaic of cracks running throughout the bottom panel.

Fortunately the base was twin skinned with laminate.
I refilled the tank and continued using it until the rear brace separated from the rear panel, again I was fortunate to use laminate glass as the panel simply bowed out, this time I shut the tank down. Definitely unsafe!

If the secondary piece of glass is complete with a sound silicone joint you will have no troubles what so ever.

If there is any flex on any tank it will give you the same trouble even if it was made by the best man in the best manufacturers in the entire world.

A fully supported bottom will not flex, if it does, it wasn't fully supported!

I personally would disregard this scaremongering.
(No offence mebbid but really I disagree 100% and I have a very good reason why)
One question to you, have you carried out this type of repair before or have you indulged yourself in tank construction?

I will say, the best way is to replace the bottom panel but it is not necessary.

My big tank is a twin skin design using regular glass, really I have no worries about the base panel on this build. (Vertical butt & inlay panel, similar to the ops suggested repair using a full sheet, I think it will have a lateral butt joint though as this is most common on manufactured tanks)
My reef tank is a twin skin base on the main display/sump section.
The remainder of my builds use laminate but the actual method of fixing varies, I still use silicone but some joints are vertical butts and some are lateral butts, neither is cause for concern but I think the lateral type joint offers an extra degree of security on the bottom piece.

These are my DIY. Designed and built by me, my first tank and the big tank I had a company manufacture the panels to spec (my bosses at the time)
The remainder I cut/drilled/polished myself.
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Old 11-13-2014, 02:18 PM   #18
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Strongly disagree with this statement!

My first tank I built, I dropped a rock into it which cracked the bottom, I patched it up just like this, when I emptied the tank during a full service there was a beautiful spider web mosaic of cracks running throughout the bottom panel.

Fortunately the base was twin skinned with laminate.
I refilled the tank and continued using it until the rear brace separated from the rear panel, again I was fortunate to use laminate glass as the panel simply bowed out, this time I shut the tank down. Definitely unsafe!

If the secondary piece of glass is complete with a sound silicone joint you will have no troubles what so ever.

If there is any flex on any tank it will give you the same trouble even if it was made by the best man in the best manufacturers in the entire world.

A fully supported bottom will not flex, if it does, it wasn't fully supported!

I personally would disregard this scaremongering.
(No offence mebbid but really I disagree 100% and I have a very good reason why)
One question to you, have you carried out this type of repair before or have you indulged yourself in tank construction?

I will say, the best way is to replace the bottom panel but it is not necessary.

My big tank is a twin skin design using regular glass, really I have no worries about the base panel on this build. (Vertical butt & inlay panel, similar to the ops suggested repair using a full sheet, I think it will have a lateral butt joint though as this is most common on manufactured tanks)
My reef tank is a twin skin base on the main display/sump section.
The remainder of my builds use laminate but the actual method of fixing varies, I still use silicone but some joints are vertical butts and some are lateral butts, neither is cause for concern but I think the lateral type joint offers an extra degree of security on the bottom piece.

These are my DIY. Designed and built by me, my first tank and the big tank I had a company manufacture the panels to spec (my bosses at the time)
The remainder I cut/drilled/polished myself.
Thats funny, because I strongly disagree with this statement. Like I said before, is it worth it to risk thousands of dollars in damage to save $200? Sounds like a pretty cut and dry trade off to me.
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Old 11-13-2014, 02:37 PM   #19
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Have you carried out any type of work of this nature?
Do you have any glass experience? (Cutting, fitting etc)
Do you have any silicone glass experience? (E.g. Tough walls, shop fronts etc.)

I agree the best way would be to replace the panel, BUT! It is NOT the disaster you allude to should it be left in place.

Either way you are paying for a full sheet of glass! Where is the saving? Labor!

Your time or somebody else's. No money is saved. I state this on the assumption all works are of DIY nature and no contractors are involved.

If you're paying somebody else, start again, if you're doing it, tape the base externally, support tank on polystyrene in situ, level tank, install replacement panel, silicone joint perimeter.

Allow product to fully cure!

Test fill with water to 33%, check for leaks.
50% check.
Fill check.

Have hose handy to siphon should you need to.

If you are confident in your work, this type of repair will present no real problems. The most difficult task will be getting the sheet in the tank. Cut a card or better still plywood template, trial run it, if it goes in and out, take that to a glass merchant, have a panel cut and polished, repeat the above but for real.
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Old 11-13-2014, 02:47 PM   #20
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I agree the best way would be to replace the panel, BUT! It is NOT the disaster you allude to should it be left in place.
No, I don't have glass work experience. Nor do I need glass experience to see the potential problems that arise from trying to patch a crack rather than replace the pane of glass.

You said it yourself that the cracked glass you patched was toast with a mosaic of cracks running through it.

My point is, that even if the chance of the bottom panel breaking is minute, the $200 ish dollars that it will cost you to buy a new panel of glass and replace it is miniscule compared to what could happen IF that failure were to happen.

Even assuming all repairs would be diy the damage to your house could EASILY cost thousands of dollars in damage.

There was a person on this forum that bought a cheap stand that got wet and failed dumping a 55g tank on the floor. If i remember correctly the repair bill was over $10,000.

The risk of patching outweighs the benefit.
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