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Old 02-21-2010, 09:29 PM   #1
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Anyone use an auto shut off for your sump?

I was looking at this..... they have a singal one to....

PlumbingSupply.com - electronic hi-lo pump switch - automatic hi low float switch replacement


I have had no luck trying to find schematic to make my own

Thoughts?
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Old 02-21-2010, 09:35 PM   #2
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are you wanting a float valve that shuts off the pump when the water level gets low? if so, theoretically all you would need is a float valve like you have on an auto top off unit, except cross the wires so that its pumping when the float is up, but kills the circuit when the float is down... pretty much the opposite of an ato
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Old 02-21-2010, 09:42 PM   #3
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are you wanting a float valve that shuts off the pump when the water level gets low? if so, theoretically all you would need is a float valve like you have on an auto top off unit, except cross the wires so that its pumping when the float is up, but kills the circuit when the float is down... pretty much the opposite of an ato
yes but this take out the "failing float" part as it just contacts,

I suppose these could corrode but seem less complicated then a float system,

it would seem like something like would be hard but i need a schematic to follow LOL
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:02 PM   #4
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This doesn't seem that hard... It seems as if it's simply two wires, and the water acts as a conductor. Of course the signal would be very low voltage and amperage, as to not hurt the fish. I'll draw up a schematic of how I would do it.

Just forewarning you, I have NO idea of this would have any detrimental effects to the fish. Someone more experienced would have to chime in.
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:12 PM   #5
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This doesn't seem that hard... It seems as if it's simply two wires, and the water acts as a conductor. Of course the signal would be very low voltage and amperage, as to not hurt the fish. I'll draw up a schematic of how I would do it.

Just forewarning you, I have NO idea of this would have any detrimental effects to the fish. Someone more experienced would have to chime in.
the box i linked said is goes off resistance, if the contacts are in the water, resistance is low, out of the water it is very high
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:33 PM   #6
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the box i linked said is goes off resistance, if the contacts are in the water, resistance is low, out of the water it is very high
That's exactly right. When it's out of the water, resistance is VERY HIGH. Basically the two contacts aren't connected. However when the contacts are in the water, the resistance is low, meaning the two wires are connected. There is probably a lot safer way to do this, but it really depends on the relays used. I'd love to get someone else's opinion on if this'll work or not. I'm just speculating here. Anyway, here's the very simply schematic thing I drew up.



As you can see, you have power from an outlet going to the switched part of the relay. You also have less power (depending on the relay used) going to the switching part of the relay. (Coiled part in the picture). When the switch is connected (contacts are underwater), the coiled part of the relay makes a magnetic field which causes the switched part of the relay to connect, therefore running your pump. When the contacts are out of the water, there is no magnetic field, and therefore the circuit that runs the pump doesn't have any power. Everything is connected to a common ground. I'm sure you can find an aquarium safe water switch and choose your relay based on what kind of power it needs. If you want to find out how relays work, go HowStuffWorks "How Relays Work".

I'd love to get some feedback from some electrically talented aquariust out there.

EDIT: It would probably be safer to put this in your sump, but it'd be a little more complicated. Again, I have NO IDEA how this would affect the fish. Electricity, water, and live animals usually don't well together. Just a warning.
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:37 PM   #7
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That's exactly right. When it's out of the water, resistance is VERY HIGH. Basically the two contacts aren't connected. However when the contacts are in the water, the resistance is low, meaning the two wires are connected. There is probably a lot safer way to do this, but it really depends on the relays used. I'd love to get someone else's opinion on if this'll work or not. I'm just speculating here. Anyway, here's the very simply schematic thing I drew up.



As you can see, you have power from an outlet going to the switched part of the relay. You also have less power (depending on the relay used) going to the switching part of the relay. (Coiled part in the picture). When the switch is connected (contacts are underwater), the coiled part of the relay makes a magnetic field which causes the switched part of the relay to connect, therefore running your pump. When the contacts are out of the water, there is no magnetic field, and therefore the circuit that runs the pump doesn't have any power. Everything is connected to a common ground. I'm sure you can find an aquarium safe water switch and choose your relay based on what kind of power it needs. If you want to find out how relays work, go HowStuffWorks "How Relays Work".

I'd love to get some feedback from some electrically talented aquariust out there.
i have a back ground in basic electronics but to design one is another story, I can follow a schematic tho

i'm going to look into this more
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:54 PM   #8
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Look into a Madison M8000 float switch. You would just have to flip the float upside down so it kills the power when the float drops instead of when it rises.
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:58 PM   #9
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Look into a Madison M8000 float switch. You would just have to flip the float upside down so it kills the power when the float drops instead of when it rises.
That was mentioned before. I think he specifically wants one like this. Although a float switch would work well, in the sump or tank. You'd just have to test for high water in the sump, and low water in the tank.
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Old 02-26-2010, 01:23 PM   #10
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First of all I can't fid anything on that site that states this can be used in salt water so I wouldn't use it for sw tank. Other than that the device is just looking for the water to close the circuit to turn the pump off.

I just used the JBJ ATO, but I glued some screen material around it to prevent snails and macro algae from getting in there and stopping the float from dropping.
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