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Old 04-28-2006, 09:17 PM   #11
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So I got to building my stand today, picking up the tank tomorrow.

I noticed the GARF instructions suggest to put down some plywood ontop of the stand. I wasnt planning on doing this but I've got 2 high spots where the center supports attach to the outer frame - would laying some ply down be necissary to keep the glass from cracking?

I dont think its more than 1/16" above the outer frame. I've never had an aquarium this size before so I dont know how paranoid I should be about the stand being perfectly flat.


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Old 04-29-2006, 09:41 AM   #12
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Can you trim those high spots down with a sander? It will take a little while but keeping everything as level as possible will be better. Or you could take the screws out of those particular vertical supports and cut 1/16" off of the end that needs it. Mark it with a pencil so you get the cut right.

On the sheet of plywood, it depends on if your tank will sit on the 2x4s of the stand. If it does then you'll be fine without it--unless you want to put it on for aesthetics. If it doesn't, I would go and get one of those 4'x2' sheet of plywood and put it on there. You might want to go with a 3/4" sheet if the tank will not be sitting directly on the 2x4s.

Looking forward to pics if you have a camera.

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Old 04-29-2006, 03:04 PM   #13
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Unless you are building the stand in place, a level is not the key to success. Think of it as building a box. It needs to be square and the top needs to be flat. When the stand gets into place it can be leveled. Keep in mind, that no wood is perfect, nor, will it necessarily stay straight while you are working on it. Dimensional lumber is known to warp. If there are discrepencies on the top after it is finished, such as not being perfectly flat, a 3/4" piece of styrofoam will take up the imperfections. While most homebuilt stands are overkill, the extra weight does increase stability. The one thing I see missing from most homebuilt stands is built in leveling capability. My purpose built steel stands all have leveling screws in each leg, which was an absolute necessity, with the radical slope in my basement floors. Steel can be worse than wood for trying to maintain flatness, so, all the tanks on steel frames have styro under them. If you are still concerned after you are done, go with the styro. A high spot in the top frame will stress the tank. I prefer the white styro as it is softer than the coloured ones. Good luck.
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Old 04-30-2006, 12:04 AM   #14
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Well, I broke out the belt sander and went to town on the top frame - it's now perfectly smooth, flat, and most importantly.. it's perfectly level! (I didn't sand it down to be level, it just happened that I did everthing right)

I really surpised myself. I took my time and did everything right, went to Homies and got some of the highest grade kiln dried 2x4's they had, and it seems to have paid off.

Of course my wallet is now $200 lighter, but it was a **** productive day.

Here's a picture, sorry for the grainyness of the darker areas, I had to lighten them up in photoshop.

Again, thank you so much for all the help.

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Old 05-14-2006, 12:03 PM   #15
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Looks good, except you may want to add some more supports as it looks like the entire weight is being supported by the screws.
Screws have a low shear point. If you glued it, you should be ok though.

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Old 05-14-2006, 12:27 PM   #16
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Please add at least 1 cross brace to that...you could push that over no problem.

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