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Old 11-03-2013, 09:41 PM   #1
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Any such thing as over filtration?

Is there?
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Old 11-04-2013, 02:42 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Fishman007 View Post
Is there?
No, just too much flow. But thats rarely an issue unless your fish are clearly unhappy with it.
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Old 11-04-2013, 05:56 PM   #3
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You can't 'over filter' a tank, because a filter will only ever contain enough decomposition organisms to break down the waste products produced on a daily basis, no matter how large it is. So, if your water parameters are all healthy, then your filtration is enough to cope. Of course, if you are going to push the boundaries of stocking recommendations, (such as with Mbuna cichlids) then your filter will have to be capable.
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Old 11-04-2013, 06:12 PM   #4
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Over Filtration

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Originally Posted by Fishman007 View Post
Is there?
Hello Fish...

I know I'm going against a lot of experience here, but you can over filter your tank. All you really need is a system with a gph (gallon per hour) rating of 4 times the volume of the tank in gallons. The filter system's main purpose is gas exchange, not keeping the water clean. It mixes oxygen into the tank water and the surface movement allows carbon dioxide to escape.

Filtration systems do little to keep the tank water pure. They simply take in toxic water and return water that's a bit less toxic. The key to a healthy tank is large, frequent water changes. I change half the water in my tank every week to 10 days and the fish and plants stay healthy.

If you change a lot of tank water and change it frequently, the filter system is just filtering water that's already clean. So, why have an expensive filter system that's just turning over water that's already pure?

Just a thought.

B
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Old 11-05-2013, 04:28 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by BBradbury View Post

Hello Fish...

I know I'm going against a lot of experience here, but you can over filter your tank. All you really need is a system with a gph (gallon per hour) rating of 4 times the volume of the tank in gallons. The filter system's main purpose is gas exchange, not keeping the water clean. It mixes oxygen into the tank water and the surface movement allows carbon dioxide to escape.

Filtration systems do little to keep the tank water pure. They simply take in toxic water and return water that's a bit less toxic. The key to a healthy tank is large, frequent water changes. I change half the water in my tank every week to 10 days and the fish and plants stay healthy.

If you change a lot of tank water and change it frequently, the filter system is just filtering water that's already clean. So, why have an expensive filter system that's just turning over water that's already pure?

Just a thought.

B
I like your answer, it really makes sense but my fish store tells me to never do half water change unless your fish has a problem wad you think
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Old 11-05-2013, 05:01 PM   #6
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Sorry, but I can't agree. A filter is not about gaseous exchange, it is about the natural cycle that occurs in all aquatic environments to break down harmful dissolved substances. Yes, the flow mixes oxygen throughout the water column and surface agitation helps release carbon dioxide and other harmful gasses, but the bacteria living in the filter neutralise the ammonia that would otherwise build and poison the fish. Granted, you can maintain a tank by water changes alone, but even then, there will be nitrifying bacteria colonising the tank walls and any decor within the tank, feeding of the lower levels of ammonia you leave behind.

With large water changes, you are merely diluting the ammonia etc, not converting it.

It has been shown that high water flows through filters (in freshwater at least) appear to increase the efficiency of the nitrification process - probably due to extended periods of higher oxygen levels maintained by a higher flow. What large water changes offer are an alternative to filtration. The answer to the the question here, IMO is still no - you can't over filter a tank.

I would also be careful with regular LARGE water changes unless you are certain the water parameters of the new water are of suitable quality, so as not to add any extra undue stress to the aquarium inahabitants. This method is very labour intensive too. A filter system gives you stability within a closed environment as long as you adhere to necessary maintenance procedures.
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Old 11-05-2013, 05:31 PM   #7
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Sorry, but I can't agree. A filter is not about gaseous exchange, it is about the natural cycle that occurs in all aquatic environments to break down harmful dissolved substances. Yes, the flow mixes oxygen throughout the water column and surface agitation helps release carbon dioxide and other harmful gasses, but the bacteria living in the filter neutralise the ammonia that would otherwise build and poison the fish. Granted, you can maintain a tank by water changes alone, but even then, there will be nitrifying bacteria colonising the tank walls and any decor within the tank, feeding of the lower levels of ammonia you leave behind.

With large water changes, you are merely diluting the ammonia etc, not converting it.

It has been shown that high water flows through filters (in freshwater at least) appear to increase the efficiency of the nitrification process - probably due to extended periods of higher oxygen levels maintained by a higher flow. What large water changes offer are an alternative to filtration. The answer to the the question here, IMO is still no - you can't over filter a tank.

I would also be careful with regular LARGE water changes unless you are certain the water parameters of the new water are of suitable quality, so as not to add any extra undue stress to the aquarium inahabitants. This method is very labour intensive too. A filter system gives you stability within a closed environment as long as you adhere to necessary maintenance procedures.
I have sand in my tank and its so had to clean it but I don't care anymore about the sand so when I siphon I am fully siphon the sand in the top layer it's because I don't know what the black stuff is forming on top of my sand and my decoration are all tops with algaes. I'm thinking of replacing my decoys and use gravel.

Or should I wash it with bleach out something and the sands are almost to none now.

2 med/larg Angel fish
1 med blod parrot

Light timing changed to 8 hr recently from 12 hrs
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Old 11-05-2013, 05:39 PM   #8
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Over Filtering

Quote:
Originally Posted by pip walters View Post
Sorry, but I can't agree. A filter is not about gaseous exchange, it is about the natural cycle that occurs in all aquatic environments to break down harmful dissolved substances. Yes, the flow mixes oxygen throughout the water column and surface agitation helps release carbon dioxide and other harmful gasses, but the bacteria living in the filter neutralise the ammonia that would otherwise build and poison the fish. Granted, you can maintain a tank by water changes alone, but even then, there will be nitrifying bacteria colonising the tank walls and any decor within the tank, feeding of the lower levels of ammonia you leave behind.

With large water changes, you are merely diluting the ammonia etc, not converting it.

It has been shown that high water flows through filters (in freshwater at least) appear to increase the efficiency of the nitrification process - probably due to extended periods of higher oxygen levels maintained by a higher flow. What large water changes offer are an alternative to filtration. The answer to the the question here, IMO is still no - you can't over filter a tank.

I would also be careful with regular LARGE water changes unless you are certain the water parameters of the new water are of suitable quality, so as not to add any extra undue stress to the aquarium inahabitants. This method is very labour intensive too. A filter system gives you stability within a closed environment as long as you adhere to necessary maintenance procedures.
Good topic to discuss...

I can't find a negative to large, weekly water changes. When you change the water you remove the toxins. Toxins take time to build up to levels that will hurt your fish. If you continually flush pure water into the tank, there's no time for toxins to build up before the next large change. The fish and plants live in pure water conditions all the time.

Thinking about it, if you changed half the tank water daily, you could do away with the filtration altogether. The water would always have enough O2 and the water would be free of all wastes. Just like in nature, there would be a constant source of pure water and wastes would always be removed.

B
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Old 11-05-2013, 05:53 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by BBradbury View Post

Good topic to discuss...

I can't find a negative to large, weekly water changes. When you change the water you remove the toxins. Toxins take time to build up to levels that will hurt your fish. If you continually flush pure water into the tank, there's no time for toxins to build up before the next large change. The fish and plants live in pure water conditions all the time.

Thinking about it, if you changed half the tank water daily, you could do away with the filtration altogether. The water would always have enough O2 and the water would be free of all wastes. Just like in nature, there would be a constant source of pure water and wastes would always be removed.

B
Awesome I'm so gonna change water 50% and stay something new again with gravel this time for sure and how do you deal with algae on your decor it's like I would clean it and the next day it's back to the same
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Old 11-05-2013, 08:24 PM   #10
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I don't think there's ever over filtration. I have a powerhead connected to a filter, an hob, an internal filter, live rock, and a deep sand bed in my nano. Filters only add more space for the bacteria to live and breed. But of course nothing can beat regular water changes.
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