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Old 08-19-2006, 01:11 AM   #11
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lol. Same thing then just I don't get a minor for it. Maybe I can though with a few extra classes. I've gone through chem 1 and 2 and organic 1 only. Maybe two more classes and I'll have myself a minor. Hmmmmm.

You have to take a Stat class as well as another math, and I think that's it. I've already taken a Pre-Calculus class so I think I'm all done. Taking Stat this coming fall semester.

To keep the thoughts flowing for sirdudeguy, what are you planning to do after you get your degree?
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Old 08-19-2006, 01:16 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Devilishturtles
To keep the thoughts flowing for sirdudeguy, what are you planning to do after you get your degree?
Me? I'm going into High School teaching (biology, hopefully).. which is not the kind of job everyone jumps at the chance to have =oP

I would imagine there are various things that could be done-
- get a marketing minor and open up your own "fish cleaning" business for salt water creatures

- with a degree in marine biology and enough SW experience you could work at a zoo, or an amusement park that handles larger sea mammals
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Old 08-20-2006, 02:56 AM   #13
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hey, thanks everyone for the helpful info!

devilishturtles...there plenty of ocean in arizona..lol just kidding. well there are a ton of reefers, but ya...no ocean which pretty much sucks if you ask me (we get freakin sand instead...honestly...who wants sand???)

And i wouldnt take any of these classes here in az either. I visited the scripps institue/birch aquarium in san diego over the summer and thought that looked pretty cool...going to school there...really expensive probably..but idk...might be good.

As for what i want to do...i really dont know yet lol. I mean i would really like to get into something to do with aquaria/marine animals, but the way all my credits and stuff are right now...i'm more in line to get a major in auto repair or something like that. And thats probably what i'd be better at too...auto mechanics=less science and math...biology=lots of both. Thats originally what i've been planning on doing...just being a mechanic (not at some shop, but like for those big catarpiller tractors and stuff like that...basically specialty stuff.

i've actually been thinking about getting a part time job w/an aquarium maintainence company around here for right now. I know they make pretty good money, and i know that me being only a senior in high school i wouldnt be making nearly as much as them, but hey...money's money (which i dont have right now ) and it would give me an idea of if i would want to continue that.

but yeah, being in az really limits what i can do i know. I would have to move to like cali or something at least if i wanted to get into it.

but ya...just trying to figure out my options

thanks again everyone, and yes i did check out that job site. very helpful, and yet theres so many options on there i cant chose lol.
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Old 08-20-2006, 03:50 PM   #14
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Are you planning on staying in AZ for college? There is also a surprising amount of FW stream fisheries work that goes on in the southwest. Check out the American Fisheries Society's website (www.fisheries.org), you might find some interesting stuff there, and they post a lot of job opportunities.

If you're mechanically inclined, you might be able to get a job working for a company that makes aquarium products, like filters or pumps etc. Not directly workign with critters but I bet you'd get lots of discounts!

My best advice though, is still to get the best general undergraduate education that you can. Take as many classes from different fields as you can. There is no need to specialize in undergrad; I am on a committee that handles applications for the grad school and the faculty are much more interested in applicants with broad undergraduate training and hands-on experience, and I think that applies for jobs as well. I know math and chemistry can be scary, but they aren't really that bad. It is also very important to keep your GPA up, which can be hard to remember when everyone's out partying! You only get one chance at college (usually), and the first 2 years have the biggest impact on your GPA. Scope out the faculty and pick a section with a professor that has a good reputation; that can make all the difference.
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Old 08-20-2006, 08:07 PM   #15
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Very good to start looking into things now. Just have a strong science background going into college. Don't be surprised if 6 years from now you aren't doing anything related to marine biology. Not many go in to school and stick with their original major. Usually it is safe to say I will be doing something in the science field, etc... Once in college of course you first couple years will knock out all the basic science classes. I would recommend taking various classes outside of your directed courses of study. I tried taking classes that would help me out in various fields. I ended up looking at pre med, vet, pharm, bio, chemistry, etc... and trying to select "electives" that would meet the needs of several fields besides just my major. Makes it tougher class wise but if one changes their mind makes it alot easier not to hit a glitch during school (saves a lot of money also ). For electives take things if possible that will help at some point even if you don't think it will. For example I took enough real estate classes to get a license if I wanted. Where as my friends may have taken advanced bowling.

I would highly recomend that if you do stick with aquatic biology, marine, etc... get a second major or strong minors. Increases your odds of making some money if you stop there. You never know what will happen grad school might not be an option. Grad school is almost a must if you really want to make a decent check at some point but even then entry into the workforce early in another fieled may yield much better rewards in the long run. Money isn't everything but from experience it can change ones direction and can result in careers one never even dreamed of when starting college or even one month from graduation.
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Old 08-24-2006, 07:37 PM   #16
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Quote:
i've actually been thinking about getting a part time job w/an aquarium maintainence company around here for right now. I know they make pretty good money, and i know that me being only a senior in high school i wouldnt be making nearly as much as them, but hey...money's money (which i dont have right now Smile ) and it would give me an idea of if i would want to continue that.
That is so important!
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but the way all my credits and stuff are right now...i'm more in line to get a major in auto repair or something like that
That doesn't matter--everything changes in college and when you graduate, everything can change again!

Having completed a BS in Biology, a MS in Zoology, walked away from a PhD in Neurobiology and having taught labs for freshman bio through graduate courses I have some advice and (hopefully) sound reasoning to base your future stepping blocks on.

1~My undergrad college only offered a Bio degree--no premed, prevet, marine, etc, because they are limiting. You can show your area of focus by which classes you take and more importantly what you do outside of the classroom (I volunteered and then worked as a vet tech for two years--I learned I really did not want to be a veterinarian). That experience will help shape future decisions and show advisors and potential employers that you are serious.

2~The sciences are not for everyone. I had many students walk into freshman bio with stars in their eyes and dreams of being a doctor, pharmacist, forensic scientist, etc. only to realize by the end of the first semester that biology was not their thing. Even if they made it through bio (and the first year is really to cull out the students that aren't sure or will not make it--with only a year into college, there is plenty of time to change majors), they may have found chemistry too difficult or calculus too daunting. For my undergrad degree (and it is different for different schools), bio majors were required to take Calc I, Bio I, Chem I plus core courses the first semester—30 started in Sept and only 18 returned in January (small private school, but I saw the same thing at the University).

3~You do need a good grasp of English--forget Shakespeare! You will be writing lab reports, papers, eventually a thesis, grants...and you need to be able to effectively communicate. I had a business student in my lab once and she constantly lost points due to poor writing--I could not make sense of what she was trying to get across--and she out right told me she didn't think you needed to know how to write for biology.

4~Four year universities are not the best start for everyone. My husband started out at a community college and worked full time while living at home. Then he was accepted to a university and completed his degree. I went to a small four year college while living at home and then moved away for grad school. Both of us had experience outside the classroom and were easily admitted to grad school.
Quote:
You only get one chance at college (usually), and the first 2 years have the biggest impact on your GPA.
I don't agree with that, since you can always go to a community college to prove you're "ready" even after quitting school for years. I also served on a graduate school application committee and we looked for people with broader interests. Generally, it didn't matter how old the student was or where they got their undergrad degree, or how long it took. The letter of intent backed up by references were the biggest factors (and the fact they passed their courses). Unless you are going for a scholarship, passing your classes with a B average and having experiences outside the classroom is more important than a narrow focus and a 4.0. Plus, if you are flexible and "shop around" you will find a school that will accept you.

5~There's nothing wrong with being a mechanic. With almost all high school students feeling the push towards college (and many of them are simply not ready at 18, or ever), the trades are suffering. If you have a gift with engines and mechanics, use it! You can always have a side business dealing with SW--honestly; experience will get you further than a degree if you're talking retail to tank maintenance.

After all my schooling, I walked away from the whole biology and academics field to become a business developer. I wouldn't trade my biology background for anything (met my husband, got into fish keeping, lived in Canada, and am one of few spouses that can follow what my husband is talking about at work), but I wish someone had told me there is life and financial security away from higher education.
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Old 08-24-2006, 08:59 PM   #17
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As a recent Chemistry BS graduate making a pretty good chunk of change I would say stay with the mechanic stuff for a bit (perhaps summers), and get involved in research during the school year. For my first few years of college I worked for a general contractor summers, and in a research lab during the year for credit. Those are the two main reasons I got the job I did. They want to see that you can function in a professional environment, and also that you have real word common sense that can be applied to a variety of situations.
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Old 08-25-2006, 07:55 AM   #18
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Menagerie, very helpful advice!

I decided to start out at a community college as well. Saved myself a CRAP load of money and got to start with smaller class sizes (amazingly!). My experience wasn't the best, so unfortanetly my knowledge and learning experience isn't as good as I would wish it could be. Therefore, I think research into your professors is a good idea. (I think that was mentioned already, sorry if it was). Had I known who I was signing up for, I wouldn't have gone to his classes.

Now I have to retake my chem classes because I've gotten such bad grades in it (one B, the rest of the class got D's. Guy was a jerk...)

Thanks again Menagerie, Roger.
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Old 08-28-2006, 12:48 AM   #19
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You only get one chance at college (usually), and the first 2 years have the biggest impact on your GPA.

I don't agree with that...
Menagerie has a lot of good points. I guess what I meant here was that whatever you do end up doing (ie Comm college, college etc), please do take it seriously. I've just seen too many people go to college, goof off the first two years, then realize that the "real world" is knocking on their door and then frantically try and get their GPA up in the last two years. Math-wise, those first few semesters (wherever they are) have the biggest impact on setting your GPA, and therefore it gets difficult to make major changes to your GPA the further down the road that you go.

I would definitely advocate taking classes in subjects that interest you, as there are too many people who work for a living, rather than living for (or at least enjoying) their work. If you're gonna spend a big chunk of your life working, you might as well like what you do, and a lot of people don't. But be aware that turning a hobby into a career can be very, very difficult; I tried it, went to school (post-college) then couldn't get a job in the field I wanted, so I fell back on biology/oceanography, which is a much larger field than yacht design, although that's what I really would like to be doing.
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Old 08-28-2006, 01:33 AM   #20
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If you are mechanically inclined and also interested in marine life, why not look into some type of engineering that would point you in that direction? There are numerous fields available to engineers...from genetics to synthetics to mechanics and software.

Perhaps working with artificial reef compounds and reef sunken ships would cater to your interests...or helping to create, and run, deep submersables for deep trench research? On the trips the deep trench researchers take, the main group of software, A/V and mechanical engineers go on the trip...they wouldn't go thousands of feet deep without them nearby.

Who knows? maybe you could figure out a better genetic bacteria for bottling or get into conservation type engineering? The people who sink ships for creating artifical reefs even get to blow things up =).

Don't limit yourself =). Genetics may take a lot of life sciences, and engineering might take a lot of mathematics, but if i could do it i am sure you can. Everyone was suprised i even made it out of high school and i hold an engineering degree now.

Whatever you decide, make being HAPPY with your job more important than making money. You can't buy satisfaction and fulfillment when you have to work at something you HATE 40+ hours a week.
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