Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Community Forum > Aquaria Off-Topic
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 01-13-2012, 02:14 AM   #1
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
roundar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 314
DHMO in Aquaria and the Facts

DHMO in Aquaria and the Facts

I wanted to take a minute to present everyone with a bit of information they may not have heard elsewhere. Dangerous pollutants are simply a part of the 21st century, but there is one particularly dangerous chemical I wanted to direct your attention to: Dihydrogen Monoxide(DHMO), or Hydric Acid.

Dihydrogen monoxide is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and kills uncounted thousands of people every year. According to dhmo.org, "Its basis is the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, a species shown to mutate DNA, denature proteins, disrupt cell membranes, and chemically alter critical neurotransmitters. The atomic components of DHMO are found in a number of caustic, explosive and poisonous compounds such as Sulfuric Acid, Nitroglycerine and Ethyl Alcohol. Each year, Dihydrogen Monoxide is a known causative component in many thousands of deaths and is a major contributor to millions upon millions of dollars in damage to property and the environment."

Despite the efforts to educate the public on the dangers, many companies are still dumping DHMO into our local streams and rivers where some of our favorite fish species live because the government refuses to intervene. The fact that it's incredibly rare to find an aquarium that doesn't contain at least trace levels of DHMO is incredibly alarming, and as fish keepers we are all conservationists on some level, we all want to preserve our environment. We need to be on the forefront of the battle against hydric acid pollution.
__________________

__________________
Dihydrogen monoxide is an industrial solvent that can be found in your local streams and rivers. Vote to ban dihydrogen monoxide immediately!
roundar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 02:20 AM   #2
come get me tang police!
 
jetajockey's Avatar


 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: In a swamp near you /Pensacola, FL
Posts: 12,047
Interesting thread. I disagree with you for a few reasons.

First off, dihydrogen monoxide may have been linked hundreds of deaths annually, but there's no conclusive evidence that this chemical in moderate amounts is directly responsible for the issue.

Sure, it has it's downsides, but it does have some benefits. It has been proven to aid with growth and health in many plant and animal species.

Also, it's everywhere. How do we ban something that is present all over the place? It would be a logistical nightmare to do so. What do we do? Get more government regulation?

Finally, so what if it is present in our home aquaria systems? I'm sure the local utility companies have a method of measuring and detecting this chemical, and I trust that they'd maintain a safe level for human consumption.


I believe that there is some hidden agenda behind Dihydrogen Monoxide Research Division - dihydrogen monoxide info and more specifically Facts About Dihydrogen Monoxide . Just the fact that they call it dihydrogen monoxide rather than hydrogen hydroxide makes it sound like they are attempting to frighten people.

Look forward to your response.
__________________

__________________
Dont Forget to Join my FREE weekly Plant Giveaway.
Click Here!
jetajockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 02:26 AM   #3
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
roundar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 314
I'm surprised to see you opposing a ban on such a chemical, but I'll be happy to address these issues.

No conclusive evidence? Not to seem contradictary, but I can quickly find cases where relatively moderate quantities have caused asphixia in babies and even small children. Keep in mind we're just talking about the short term effects. In the gasious state hydric acid has been known to cause incredibly severe burning of the skin, imagine what it's doing to fish and small wildlife. I have no doubt it may improve growth in plants and animals, but as I've said, it causes the mutation of DNA(Kind of an important aspect of "growth" imo). The logistical problems involved should not be a roadblock. If plutonium were everywhere we would certainly disregard the logistics of removing, and get to work. We simply need enough people who are willing to listen to the information on hydric acid(Information that can be found all over the web BTW). As for local utility companies handing the problem, I simply have no respone because I simply don't have the blind faith in them that you do.

The last objection is a fallacy, the motives of an information source are not not indicitive of the truth of the information. Besides, you have your pick of sites all over the web where this information can be found.
__________________
Dihydrogen monoxide is an industrial solvent that can be found in your local streams and rivers. Vote to ban dihydrogen monoxide immediately!
roundar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 02:41 AM   #4
come get me tang police!
 
jetajockey's Avatar


 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: In a swamp near you /Pensacola, FL
Posts: 12,047
Good points. Again, the term 'hydric acid' seems to put a gloom and doom aura around the chemical.

As far as blind faith goes, I wouldn't call it that, but I have as much trust as any other person who drinks/cooks/bathes with utility provided water.

The big focus here though is aquaria. What impacts has DHMO had in aquaria? I've not seen much evidence that it's been harmful in any way. In fact, I recall seeing some reports that large concentrations of it can actually be beneficial to livestock in the long term.

Either way, I think it'll take a lot more concrete evidence to get this idea some traction, if it's even possible.
__________________
Dont Forget to Join my FREE weekly Plant Giveaway.
Click Here!
jetajockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 04:35 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
roundar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 314
There are several names for Dihydrogen Monoxide: Dihydrogen Oxide, Hydrogen Hydroxide, Hydronium Hydroxide, or you may know it by another name. I believe that hydric acid is the most appropriate name. You can call it a war resolution device, but it's still an atom bomb; similarly, hydric acid is still an industrial solvent being dumped anywhere and everywhere. DHMO is used in chemical warfare and in World War II prison camps in Japan, and in prisons in China, for various forms of torture... There is reason enough to be concerned before we even get to aquaria. But how does it effect us as fish keepers? More ways than you might think. We disagree on the effects in the aquarium, that much is clear. You may find reports of such information, but I too can find many reports that make a clear connection between fish deaths and hydric acid. I was surprised once after I had a few fish die for no apparent reason to find dhmo in the tank. Furthermore the effects are not just with our tanks at home, we have to consider the effects it has on the environment these fish come from. If we keep putting DHMO in our rivers and streams(it's even being dumped into the ocean, as well as being used in propulsion devises by naval ships), who knows what the future will hold for aquatic life.

I'd say the concrete evidence is there, but I think real life hands on experience with the substance(or lack thereof) is the real key to understanding its effects. A friend of mine owns a pool that he keeps DHMO free. The moment you jump in you can feel the difference. It's life changing. I issue you this challenge: Go one week hydric acid free. You'll never be able to argue against a ban again, I promise.
__________________
Dihydrogen monoxide is an industrial solvent that can be found in your local streams and rivers. Vote to ban dihydrogen monoxide immediately!
roundar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 05:32 PM   #6
Aquarium Free - 2+ Years
 
mfdrookie516's Avatar



POTM Champion
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Winchester, Ky
Posts: 19,410
FWIW, i measured very high levels of DHMO in some snow I collected from my back deck last night. I was alarmed at the results. I, too, am in support of a ban.
__________________
-Jonathan

"What, exactly, is the internet? Basically it is a global network exchanging digitized data in such a way that any computer, anywhere, that is equipped with a device called a 'modem', can make a noise like a duck choking on a kazoo." - Dave Barry
mfdrookie516 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 05:43 PM   #7
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
adadkins1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Morristown, TN
Posts: 1,762
I agree that something has to be done about all of this DHMO being dumped into water supplies. I measured the levels of DHMO in my aquarium and they were off the charts. We need to start a petition to ban this stuff ASAP!
__________________
><(((º> Aaron ><(((º>
adadkins1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 09:12 PM   #8
come get me tang police!
 
jetajockey's Avatar


 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: In a swamp near you /Pensacola, FL
Posts: 12,047
You make a very compelling argument roundar.

I guess it's fair to be concerned when it has been measured in high levels. It should be mandatory for everyone to test for these kind of things. Gauges are readily available and can even be found in some households. Perhaps we should add them to the list of 'aquarist staples'.
__________________
Dont Forget to Join my FREE weekly Plant Giveaway.
Click Here!
jetajockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 09:31 PM   #9
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
adadkins1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Morristown, TN
Posts: 1,762
Is there any type of media that can sequester DHMO? I am very worried about my fish because they are living an a tank with such high levels of this chemical.
__________________
><(((º> Aaron ><(((º>
adadkins1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 11:55 PM   #10
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Ziggs180's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 364
I just purchased a a test kit from my LFS to test for DHMO levels, They were completely off the charts! I immediately did a 50% water change, and tested afterwards, but the levels just won't go down! My fish seem to be acting just fine, but this Chemical is probably slowly killing them in a brutal and agonizing way, but I have no idea on how to get rid of it!
__________________

__________________
46Gallon Natural Planted Tank. 8 Harlequin Rasboras, 5 Amano shrimp, 2 German blue Rams, 1 Dwarf Gourami, 5 Platys, 1 Albino Bristlenose
Ziggs180 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off








» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.