Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Freshwater > Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 03-11-2011, 12:30 AM   #1
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Marconis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 2,082
Biological reasons for being unable to bury rhizome

We recently had two lectures on plants in my biology course, and the topic of rhizomes came up very briefly. As I was studying, I stopped to wonder, "Why will some plants slowly die if you bury their rhizome?" Obviously, different plants have different rhizomes. Many ferns, as we know, have above ground rhizomes. What makes them so different than those that grow underground?

Well, I emailed my professor. He barely didn't really answer my question and told me that underground rhizomes tend to specialize more in plant propagation, whereas the above ground rhizomes tend to serve as a base point for fronds to grow off of. This makes sense, but it still doesn't answer my question. He told me to come in and look at botany books; when I arrived, he actually seemed irritated (I guess he was busy) when I posed the question about the biological differences between the rhizomes, he didn't really seem like he wanted to talk about it. In the end, he pretty much said, "That's just the way it works."

This answer for me, is not sufficient. I have done countless variations of google searches, and continually find "Just don't bury the rhizome" without any explanation as to why, biologically, the plant will die if you do so. It is frustrating me that I cannot find such information, especially when there must be an answer out there. If the above ground rhizome merely serves as a horizontal stem for leaf/frond growth, why would this function be inhibited underneath the substrate? The leafs are still getting light, and can still grow, so what in the rhizome stops this when buried? Are there respiratory surfaces on a rhizome that I am unaware of, and if so, why are they absent in an underground rhizome? Is there an adaptive value to having an above ground vs below ground rhizome?

If anyone has any information on this, please, share it! Also, if the answer is simple, slap me in the face with it! I just need to know. Thanks!
__________________

Marconis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 12:55 PM   #2
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Marconis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 2,082
Noone!?
__________________

Marconis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 02:37 PM   #3
Aquarium Free - 2+ Years
 
mfdrookie516's Avatar



POTM Champion
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Winchester, Ky
Posts: 19,409
I have no idea. Never really even thought about it either, until just now. Hmmm...
__________________
-Jonathan

"What, exactly, is the internet? Basically it is a global network exchanging digitized data in such a way that any computer, anywhere, that is equipped with a device called a 'modem', can make a noise like a duck choking on a kazoo." - Dave Barry
mfdrookie516 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 02:42 PM   #4
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Oak Forest, IL
Posts: 4,388
Quote:
Healthy rhizomes and bulbs
One common problem in the aquarium is rhizomes and bulbs rotting due to lack of oxygen. This is caused when it is buried in the substrate where there is heavy accumulation of decaying organic matter. You can avoid this by leaving the bulb or rhizome above the substrate or burying only enough to keep it rooted.
Robert Paul Hudson's AB Blog

I found a little something.
__________________
A man's errors are his portals of discovery.
Guide to The Fishless Cycle Cycling With Fish
My DIY LED Light Fixture
Feel free to PM me directly with questions.
BigJim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 02:45 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Marconis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 2,082
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
Robert Paul Hudson's AB Blog

I found a little something.
Interesting. I haven't checked that blog, but based on the little tidbit you posted, it seems that there are important respiratory surfaces on the rhizome. I wonder how that separates it from an underground rhizome, though.
Marconis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 03:23 PM   #6
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Oak Forest, IL
Posts: 4,388
Reading through the article, it basically says that a rhizome is where the crypt stores its energy.

In the wild, crypts grow in places that flood and dry out. Crypt melt and a rhizome allow the crypts to survive. When the conditions change, the leaves melt so the crypt isn't wasting energy by supporting leaves that aren't suited for the new conditions. It uses the energy to grow new leaves that are more efficient.

My knowledge of botany and the chemical processes by which a plant grows is limited, so I don't know what role oxygen plays, other than maybe to stave off other compounds that might damage the crypt.
__________________
A man's errors are his portals of discovery.
Guide to The Fishless Cycle Cycling With Fish
My DIY LED Light Fixture
Feel free to PM me directly with questions.
BigJim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 03:25 PM   #7
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Marconis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 2,082
Awesome, thanks BigJim. Would you mind taking a look at my recent thread in general discussion? I highly value your opinion.

Thanks.
Marconis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 06:13 PM   #8
Dividing by 0
Community Admin
 
fort384's Avatar



POTM Champion
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Illinois
Posts: 13,924
I always assumed that the material that makes up above ground rhizomes contain chloroplasts, which need light for photosynthesis. If you bury the parts of the plants that contain chloroplasts, no photosynthesis can take place, which means no glucose is produced, which means respiration cannot take place, which would lead to it eventually dieing (much like plant leaves die if not subjected to enough light). Underground rhizomes are not photosynthetic, and are more like a root... they are not green (because they don't contain any chlorophyll thanks to their lack of chloroplasts).
fort384 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 07:36 PM   #9
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Marconis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 2,082
Yeah, see, I wasn't aware they contained cells with chloroplasts, as I didn't think they had a reason to. Leaves have chloroplasts as well, as you know. There must be something more going on than chloroplasts/stomatal openings and what not. Stomata on the rhizome is extremely unlikely in an aquatic plant I'd assume. Maybe, though, that would explain the slow decay of the plant as opposed to a rapid dying.

I need to find a botany book with some physiology of rhizomes outlined.

You should have been there during photosynthesis lecture last semester!
Marconis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 09:38 PM   #10
Dividing by 0
Community Admin
 
fort384's Avatar



POTM Champion
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Illinois
Posts: 13,924
My line of thinking was if the rhizome is green there is chlorophyll, which means there are chloroplasts.
__________________

fort384 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bio, biological

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
photo?s for ID reasons xander Show Off/Photography 6 07-06-2010 02:30 PM
Making a rhizome split on Anubias fish_4_all Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 8 10-20-2006 09:03 PM
Help with jump starting a java fern rhizome 7Enigma Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 4 09-28-2006 07:28 AM
Java fern - rhizome extremenewb Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 5 01-02-2005 11:21 AM
Ever wonder what a rhizome looks like? madasafish Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 4 12-09-2003 01:35 AM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.