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Old 06-28-2011, 07:10 PM   #1
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Can somone help

45g tank with filter built in to hood.
Stock is:- 9 neons
3 runny nose
4 silver tip tetras
2 bristle nose pleco
1 tiger pleco
1 sail fin pleco
2 cherry barb
3 platy
1 gourmi
2 panda Corey
2 pepper corey
3 albino Corey
2 glow light tetras
2 clown loach
5 x ray tetra
2 widows
1 elephant nose
1 rainbow tetra

Ammonia is 0
Nitrate is 0
Nitrite is 0

I have a problem with fish dying all the time. I can't see any reason as to why it's happening. I have taken out all the fish that I feel could have caused a problem but still they keep dying. It's almost one a day. The tank is planted with sand substrate. I do my water changes every week with out fail. I feed a mixture of flakes pellets and blood worm and feed twice a day. No food is left behind. My neons are just dying at a rapid rate. It's not only getting expensive but it's destroying my love for the hobby. Can someone please help me out. Also I can't seem to fine the remains of some of the fish.
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Old 06-28-2011, 07:18 PM   #2
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Hi. Seems like there are multiple things going on here. How long has the tank been running?

What are you testing your water with?

Feeding twice a day is unnecessary and could have some impact on the issue at hand.

Your stock seems to be very mismatched and overstocked. Things like clown loaches and sailfin plecos get way too large for that size tank, or even a tank twice the size. Also, many of the schoolers that either need to be moved or filled in. I would break down the list and pick your favorites first and then work around them .
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Old 06-28-2011, 07:35 PM   #3
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I had more shoal fish but they just keep dying. The thing that confuses me is that not all of one type of fish is dying. It's random. The neons on the other hand are dropping like flys. The tank has been set up a few months now. About 4 months. My water parameters dont seem bad. I am using test tubes with drops and not test strips.
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Old 06-28-2011, 07:38 PM   #4
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You should have a nitrate reading if the biofilter is working properly.

Random deaths can be somewhat difficult to diagnose, but the first concern for me would be the sheer amount of fish in that size of tank.
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Old 06-28-2011, 07:49 PM   #5
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The lack of nitrate is due to a small miss hap where a large amount of water went on the floor so it ended up being a massive water change. How many fish would you suggest and do u think that any of the fish in the tank would be responsible for killing other fish.
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Old 06-29-2011, 12:37 AM   #6
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Given that it's a 45g, I'd stick with 2-3 schooling groups for mid/top, a group of cories for the bottom, and maybe a centerpiece type fish or a few loner type fish to fill in the rest. I'd definitely get away from those plecos, if you really want a pleco go with a BN or two, they stay small.
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Old 06-29-2011, 01:14 AM   #7
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Other things that would be helpful to know is what filter you are using, do you notice any odd behavoir from the fish (flashing, scraping against rocks decor, swimming vertically, etc). I would retest the water so we can get an idea of where your nitrates are at, because with four pleco's in there, its got to be like a tornado of waste.
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Old 06-29-2011, 02:12 AM   #8
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That's a lot of fish you have for that tank, need extra water changes. I can't say too much about that, I use to have 28+ fish in a 10 gallon. Water was always clear and good parameters and healthy fish because I did frequent water changes.

I wouldn't be too worried about what size fish might be in the future. It will take a few years before they outgrow the tank, by then you can decide on what you want to do with them.

As long as you do frequent water changes (TLC) and this one is important, arrange the decorations, plants, etc to maximize space, your fish will thrive.
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Old 06-29-2011, 02:23 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plecoking View Post
I wouldn't be too worried about what size fish might be in the future. It will take a few years before they outgrow the tank, by then you can decide on what you want to do with them.
Sorry but I disagree. It takes less than that for the fish to outgrow this size tank, and given that it's overstocked already, they should be the first to go.
Just leaving them in there and not worrying about it till they get larger is not a very responsible approach and doesn't deal with the issue. What's better, deal with a small problem now, or put it off and have a large problem later?

Most people don't keep a fish for a few years and then just easily get rid of them as they get too large, they get attached, and it can be difficult to find a proper home for these larger species. Keeping with this current stocking plan it would take a huge tank to accommodate them all, much larger than most people would be willing to get, so why not quell the problem in its infancy?

Quote:
As long as you do frequent water changes (TLC) and this one is important, arrange the decorations, plants, etc to maximize space, your fish will thrive.
Maximizing space isn't going to make the tank any bigger, it's just way too small for the stock list.
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Old 06-29-2011, 04:05 AM   #10
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I understand both points of view re stock. Putting that aside for a second the problem I have at the mo is that fish are dying. I need help identifying the reason why.
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