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Old 09-17-2012, 08:29 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Beengirl

BB=Beneficial Bacteria. The stuff that you need to process the ammonia and nitrite. Any ammonia source will work-If you're thinking of adding something live to the tank next week (as long as your levels are okay), then just throw in a pinch of food every couple days. That'll break down into ammonia and keep the BB alive til you add fish.
I was thinking about getting a pair of clown fish as my first fish, can i also get some snails in the same day?
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Old 09-17-2012, 09:04 PM   #12
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I forgot to mention i also just recenty been using nutrafin cycle since saturday and stress coat for about a week now, and ive used prime
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:28 PM   #13
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I'm not doubting the qoute for higher salinity, that is just a lot higher than I've ever seen at various sites (live aquaria, etc) or seen in books that give ideal parameters. Most LFSs that I've gone to over the years run their FOWLR tanks at .023.

IMO the .019 seems too low.

Is everyone else running levels that high?
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Old 09-18-2012, 07:39 PM   #14
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The quote I posted is from Ron Skimek, PhD in Marine Biology.
Here is another by Randy Holmes-Farley, PhD.
Reef Aquarium Water Parameters by Randy Holmes-Farley - Reefkeeping.com
For reference, natural ocean water has a salinity of about 35 ppt, corresponding to a specific gravity of about 1.0264 and a conductivity of 53 mS/cm.
As far as I know, there is little real evidence that keeping a coral reef aquarium at anything other than natural levels is preferable.

As both have said, there is no reason to keep your tank at anything other than the salinity of natural seawater. With that being said, 1.026 isn't too high. The question should be why would anyone keep it lower?
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Old 09-18-2012, 08:29 PM   #15
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Ive also read that lower salt levels dont stress the fish as much
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Old 09-18-2012, 10:17 PM   #16
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So if stores usually run tanks at around .023 and I wanted to run mine at .026, is that jump going to hurt/stress the fish that I bring home? The higher salinity sure makes sense, just wonder why stores/suppliers don't go with that.
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Old 09-18-2012, 10:47 PM   #17
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So if stores usually run tanks at around .023 and I wanted to run mine at .026, is that jump going to hurt/stress the fish that I bring home? The higher salinity sure makes sense, just wonder why stores/suppliers don't go with that.

You will want to ensure that you provide an appropriate acclimation period so the animal can adjust to the change in salinity.
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Old 09-19-2012, 02:53 PM   #18
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Was reading this thread and I agree with the above. Your salinity levels should be in a higher range. I find it irritating that most fish stores keep their salinity at .021-.022 and lead people to believe that this is the normal accepted perimeter for keeping saltwater fish. I think they do this in hopes of thwarting off any parasites however it's not something you would want to do within your own tank. As mentioned before, the idea is to create a smaller ecosystem that resembles their real ecosystem as close as possible. You should shoot for perfect water all the time as well as the salinity levels. Consistency is important. (not lecturing you! I'm scolding most of the LFS out there!)

If you slowly acclimate over a period of time they will not have an issue. I use drip acclimation not only for inverts but for fish because it's not as stressful or sudden. Don't forget to QT your new fish when you add them for parasites.
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Old 09-19-2012, 03:03 PM   #19
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So if stores usually run tanks at around .023 and I wanted to run mine at .026, is that jump going to hurt/stress the fish that I bring home? The higher salinity sure makes sense, just wonder why stores/suppliers don't go with that.
The short answer? Higher salt levels means more salt, more salt means more money. They are trying to keep costs down. As long as they have good practices of acclimation from their vendor, and you acclimate correctly when you get the fish home, there shouldn't be problems.
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Old 09-19-2012, 03:38 PM   #20
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The short answer? Higher salt levels means more salt, more salt means more money. They are trying to keep costs down. As long as they have good practices of acclimation from their vendor, and you acclimate correctly when you get the fish home, there shouldn't be problems.
+1-^^^ agrees with this statement completely! In addition, always double check what you hear at your LFS. This is going to sound terrible BUT, anytime I go into a new store, I will purposely ask a question regarding a fish etc. that I already know the answer to. I can't tell you how many ignorant (lack of knowledge) and crazy answers I've gotten. They are in it because they enjoy the hobby I'm sure however you have to remember that it's a business and is there to make money. I just recently had a friend go to one that told her not to worry about the cycle to much...ummm..WHAT??? (sighs)
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