Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Saltwater and Reef > Saltwater Fish Only & FOWLR
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 09-20-2011, 12:00 AM   #31
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Jlsardina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,581
Send a message via AIM to Jlsardina
My return pump is hooked into my display tank with tubing and not a PVC pipe. Maybe you could look into something like that as an alternate to drilling.
__________________

__________________
Jlsardina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 12:04 AM   #32
member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,667
You don't have to drill at all. With overflow boxes and return jets like Eshopps' you can setup a sump on a tank that is already running, no drilling necessary.

BUT, drilling is a better way to go for the drain.
__________________

__________________
Fishguy2727 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 03:42 AM   #33
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
GreenMonster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 29
Yea I saw some tanks online that overflow boxes and attached to them were tubing and PVC running down into the sump. I'm also thinking about building my own aquarium stand as it is looking to be about impossible to find one that will house a 30 gallon sump with ease
__________________
GreenMonster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 09:36 AM   #34
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
rdnelson99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Atlanta GA
Posts: 1,861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishguy2727 View Post
You don't have to drill at all. With overflow boxes and return jets like Eshopps' you can setup a sump on a tank that is already running, no drilling necessary.

BUT, drilling is a better way to go for the drain.
Would love to learn a bit more about this. I checked into the HOB Overflow and while some of the DIY ones looked pretty good I am nervous about flooding. Seems like if anything gets out of kilter you run a much higher risk than with a drilled tank.
__________________
Since my tank is a birthday present to my wife, everything I spend going forward is just an extension of my love for her right?
rdnelson99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 09:57 AM   #35
member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,667
The biggest issue is that if the u-tube loses its siphon you lose your drain. In this case your sump pump is filling the tank with nowhere for the water to go. I had issues with the one that came with my overflow box, it would lose siphon any time the pump was turned off. I bought one that was about an inch longer on each side and never had that issue again. Since a drilled tank doesn't rely on a siphon, just a drain, it takes a physical blockage to stop/reduce flow.

For any sump the best thing to do is to fill the tank until it is overflowing into the sump, then fill the sump all the way with the pump OFF. Then turn the pump on and mark on the sump where the water level drops down to. This is your safety fill level, the level at which the sump will not flood if the pump stops or the power goes out. This way you know how much you can top off with the pump on.
__________________
Fishguy2727 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 02:56 PM   #36
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
rdnelson99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Atlanta GA
Posts: 1,861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishguy2727 View Post
The biggest issue is that if the u-tube loses its siphon you lose your drain. In this case your sump pump is filling the tank with nowhere for the water to go. I had issues with the one that came with my overflow box, it would lose siphon any time the pump was turned off. I bought one that was about an inch longer on each side and never had that issue again. Since a drilled tank doesn't rely on a siphon, just a drain, it takes a physical blockage to stop/reduce flow.

For any sump the best thing to do is to fill the tank until it is overflowing into the sump, then fill the sump all the way with the pump OFF. Then turn the pump on and mark on the sump where the water level drops down to. This is your safety fill level, the level at which the sump will not flood if the pump stops or the power goes out. This way you know how much you can top off with the pump on.
Keeping the sump from overflowing doesn't worry me that much. What worries me the most is if you lose the siphon but the return pump continues to run. Seems to me the only possible solution for most people would be to maintain a low enough water line in the tank to allow the full sump capacity to pump to the tank without overflow. Draw back there is, the water line would be visible and the tank will always look like it needs topping off.

I have seen designs for overflow boxes that use the venturi tube off a power head to restart the siphon in case of a power outage but????? Seems like if the power goes out you lose the siphon then when power is restored your pump starts to run in the sump, if the siphon doesn't start you are in a world of hurt. I guess you could put a float switch on the tank that would cut off the pump if the level were to rise beyond a certain point but that is introducing a lot of stuff that could fail.
__________________
Since my tank is a birthday present to my wife, everything I spend going forward is just an extension of my love for her right?
rdnelson99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 02:57 PM   #37
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
GreenMonster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 29
I do believe the they make reef controllers that can sense a rise in water level and turn it off if something like that happens right? Also, since I am going to introduce corals into my tank eventually should I look at the benefit of installing a calcium reactor? What exactly does it do?
__________________
GreenMonster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 03:08 PM   #38
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
carey's Avatar

POTM Champion
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Deltona, Florida
Posts: 20,962
I keep my tank full enough so that it doesnt show a water line and sump at the minimum water level to cover my return pump. I use a aqualifter pump with my overflow so if the power goes out my siphon and my return pump both go out. Only the water above the teeth and left in the system will flow back into my sump which has plenty of room. If my return pump were to fail then the water level in the sump would just fill it. If my siphon fails theres enough space in my tank for it and since I keep the sump level low theres not alot of water that could go back in.

A good note is to add a hole to the return jet just above the water line or at the water line. If the power goes out the return pump line will just back siphon ALL the water thats above the plastic output into the sump which would be very bad.

I've had several power outages which is nothing new and have yet to have an issue. Fingers crossed** lol
__________________
180g Reef - 60g Rimless Reef -90G FOWLR- 125g Malawi Cichlids- 40b REEF- 34g Fresh Planted-working on- 20L FOWLR- working on
I have a mix of many different saltwater fish amongst my tanks, but I love my Tangs most of all.
carey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 03:43 PM   #39
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
rdnelson99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Atlanta GA
Posts: 1,861
So Carey, you are using a two pump system?? Seems to me that if one pump fails but other continues you got trouble. I understand the whole part of keeping the water level in the sump to a min but doesn't that defeat some of the usefulness of the sump? Maybe I am thinking too much into this. LOL

You should have seen all the thinking and planning when I built my DIY filter and bio-filter for my ponds. Then tied to the two ponds together. It pumps from one pond under pressure through the prefilter then to the bio-filter. From there it is gravity feed to the waterfall and first pond, then gravity feed underground between the two ponds. No problems yet but if it overflows, my grass gets a good watering with some high nutrient water. LOL Don't think my carpet is all that thirsty so....... To ensure I don't pump the pond with fish dry, I set the pump up high in the pond.
__________________
Since my tank is a birthday present to my wife, everything I spend going forward is just an extension of my love for her right?
rdnelson99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2011, 03:49 PM   #40
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
carey's Avatar

POTM Champion
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Deltona, Florida
Posts: 20,962
Oh no, I have just one return pump. I have the aqualifter on the overflow so that the continous siphon overflow I bought works.

I also think a dual return pump setup has too many what if's plus I wanted to keep it really really simple. lol
__________________

__________________
180g Reef - 60g Rimless Reef -90G FOWLR- 125g Malawi Cichlids- 40b REEF- 34g Fresh Planted-working on- 20L FOWLR- working on
I have a mix of many different saltwater fish amongst my tanks, but I love my Tangs most of all.
carey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
refugium, sump

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Remodel sump/refugium? JennyLynn9579 Saltwater & Reef - Getting Started 3 07-27-2011 01:19 AM







» Photo Contest Winners








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.