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Old 09-09-2008, 02:47 PM   #11
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While there's a lot of assumptions that go into rules of thumb, a good starting point (in my opinion) is to start thinking about a stocking list that is somewhere between 3 gallons/inch and 5 gallons/inch of full grown fish.

With that said, there are minimum tank sizes for all fish - some fish want to stretch their legs more than others and just can't in a smaller tank. And not all 4" fish generate the same amount of waste, so that plays into things too.

Best bet is to come up with a list and post it here and the old sages (not me... I may be old, but not "sage-ish") to comment on.
I was thinking of keeping it fairly simple. Stick with some Tangs, Clowns, and maybe some little critters to add some more activity (crabs or shrimp or starfish, and the like.) At this point I'm open to all suggestions though. I plan on adding fish at a rate of 1-2 per 2 weeks, I think I'll stick with a maximum of 10 little guys with plenty of room to hide. My primary goal is low maintenance, I know there are lots of really interesting salt water species out there, but some are finnicy, or require special care---which I'd like to avoid.
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Old 09-09-2008, 03:53 PM   #12
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With a 90g tank you are going to be limited with the kind of tang that will do well in your tank. I would stick with a yellow tang and maybe one other tang that doesn't get large. Tangs really like long tanks so they can, as Kurt put it, "stretch their legs". I would also suggest adding 1 fish per 3-4 weeks, this will allow your tank to mature and your bacteria colonies to catch up to the additional bio load.

You are going to find that low maintenance is a myth. SW tanks require daily attention, many of the tasks are simply and are done quickly but you will be "working" with your tank daily. The first year is critical and you will want to make sure to test you water often and keep up with PWCs. I recommend bi-weekly PWCs of at least 20%. By doing this you will avoid a lot of issues and keep your water balanced.
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Old 09-09-2008, 04:21 PM   #13
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...I would also suggest adding 1 fish per 3-4 weeks, this will allow your tank to mature and your bacteria colonies to catch up to the additional bio load.
Ziggy beat me to it. In my opinion, adding more than 1 fish per month in the beginning will cause you to play catch constantly with your water quality.
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Old 09-09-2008, 04:28 PM   #14
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Understood... once a month is fine by me, better for my wallet.

After reading your advice and some articles on here, this is a preliminary roster of the marine friends I'd like to keep:

1x Yelloweye/Kole Tang (smaller species, and still very beautiful it seems.)
2x Basslet
1x Blenny
2x Clowns
2x Damsels
1x Dartfish
1x Dragonet
1x Lionfish
+ snails & hermits
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Old 09-09-2008, 04:31 PM   #15
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I would avoid the damsels, and what dragonet are you referring to? Madarin? If that is what you are talking about I would suggest avoiding it for at least a year and look into adding a refugium 6-8 months before adding that fish. They feed almost entirely on life copepods. You need a well established system to support them.

The lionfish will eat anything and everything it can get in it's mouth. It is not a community fish at all.
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Old 09-10-2008, 11:10 AM   #16
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Thanks Ziggy.. I'll rework my list.

What size SUMP should I have for my 90g? Is there a Sump 101 article on here somewhere? I couldn't find one... (only how to build one), but I'd like to know how it works, what I need to add in it, how to hook it up, etc...
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Old 09-10-2008, 12:18 PM   #17
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Thanks Ziggy.. I'll rework my list.
What size SUMP should I have for my 90g? Is there a Sump 101 article on here somewhere? I couldn't find one... (only how to build one), but I'd like to know how it works, what I need to add in it, how to hook it up, etc...
You want the biggest sump you can possibly fit the more water volume the better they say it should be at least 20% of the main tanks volume to truly be effective as a refugium if you choose to have a refugium section in your sump. Check out melevsreef it has some good info for the DIY project Melevsreef.com | Acrylic Sumps & Refugiums I had someone else build mine because it was such a tight squeeze under a 46g bow cabinet. How it works really is you have and overflow box that siphons water over the top of the tank into a box and gravity feeds it into the sump. The water goes threw baffles. The baffles create different section mine has a skimmer/refugium/return pump section. The last section has the MAG7 return pump that has 3/4" vinyl tubing attached pushing the water back into the display at the end of the tubing is some locline plumbing to direct flow. The return pump section is where evaporation takes place so the bigger it is the longer you can go without having to top it off with RO/DI water. Mine I have to top off every 3-5 days so my pump doesn't run dry and burn up. Usually a gallon of water a day in my setup evaporates.

You can drill some bulkhead fittings in your tank and not have an overflow box but its not my cup of tea and someone else will have to chime in on that.
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Old 09-10-2008, 12:49 PM   #18
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Do I *need* a Sump setup? What are the pro's and con's?
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sumps, Part I by Greg Taylor - Reefkeeping.com

http://www.aquariumadvice.com/articl...uge/Page1.html
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Old 09-10-2008, 12:56 PM   #19
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Thanks both of you.. I'll read that article now. In the meanwhile:

What do you think of this "out of the box" SUMP? Includes protein skimmer, overflow box, auto-refill side tank (replenishes 4 gallons if evaporated water), and all the tubing, airstone, filter media, etc. The "Tom Pro SP4", says it does 1000gph.
Here are some details/pics of it.
Tom Aquarium Products Rapids Pro PS4 Aquarium Filtration System

I'm kind of worried this won't fit in my aquarium stand though. The dimensions are a bit confusing for a new FOWLR person like myself... seems as though there are 3 large parts to it, I'll have to check when I get home how much room I have to work with.
The reason I'm considering this particular SUMP is someone locally is selling one (brand new in box), that they don't need for $225, along with it they're including a few other things I'll require for my FOWLR setup such as live rock, sand, water test kit, etc.
Along with this sump, I'll be running my Eheim 2317 canister filter.
Should I bother with this unit, or instead make my own sump? If I make my own I'll have to purchase everything brand new to do it.
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Old 09-11-2008, 12:27 PM   #20
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I picked up that TOM wet/dry sump/filter/skimmer/auto-top off thing yesterday. Not sure if I like it though... grr.
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