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Old 09-19-2011, 11:44 PM   #1
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seahorses

Sooooo, I'm a huge fw person, but have been considering sw lately. I would love to do a tank for seahorses only. Just to have something new and to challenge me. They are gorgeous creatures that I keep going back to. My brother is huge into sw so I would definately have good help with it. My 36g bow front that is tall I think would be perfect for a couple of them. I just am not sure yet if I wanna take this step or not. Any thoughts? advice? suggestions? greatly appreciated!
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Old 09-19-2011, 11:49 PM   #2
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Hace you ever done a sw before?
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Old 09-19-2011, 11:52 PM   #3
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Don't recommend a seahorse for a start. Start off with a FOWLR using reef safe fish and as your know-how improves try your hand at corals.

If you are dead set on nothing but seahorses might wanna hold off for a while.
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Old 09-20-2011, 07:13 AM   #4
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nope never done sw only fw and I'm not dead set on anything yet just curious right now and looking into it
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Old 09-20-2011, 11:28 AM   #5
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Ya seahorses are reeally hard, if you want a challenge, try salt water in its self. Thats hard enough
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Old 09-20-2011, 12:41 PM   #6
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The reason seahorses are hard to care for is they are very sensitive to change in water parameters, they need very low water flow, there can not be any predators in the tank, they need something to hang on to and they are picky eaters. It can be done but it is not recommended for beginners. I would start off with something like a 20gal saltwater tank. Make it a fowlr at first. If you can maintain it with a few fish and some inverts for a few months then you could try seahorses. There is allot of research that needs to be done in this hobby. For instance it took me 5 months of research and acquiring stuff to start my tank.
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Old 09-22-2011, 02:06 AM   #7
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I just wanted to jump in as a long time seahorse keeper and clear up some misconceptions. Seahorses, especially captive bred ones (true captive bred, not tank raised seahorses) Are not nearly as difficult as people make them out to be. Are they as easy as clownfish? No. But there are many other aquarium fish that fall under difficult before these guys.

What they are is different. They have different requirements than many saltwater fish, and if someone goes into it thinking that they'll be just like every other fish they've raised, they're not going to have any luck.

I also wanted to jump on the low flow thing. That's old knowledge, and it turned out to be incorrect. Seahorses do quite well with a brisk flow. I keep my seahorses at around a 20x turnover rate. The important thing is to protect them from intakes, give them sheltered areas, and don't have the flow blasting them directly, say a single directional powerhead.

Temperature is also turning out to be pretty critical for seahorses. Seahorses are prone to bacterial infections, and temperature helps speed up the proliferation of bacteria. So most people keep their tropical seahorses in the low 70s, which turns out to work out fine.

I do agree that you should take your time setting up the tank before getting seahorses. I recommend that anyone new to saltwater keeping, plan to wait at least six months before you get seahorses once the tank is set up, so you can get used to how a saltwater fish tank works. Its those first months you'll be the most likely to screw something up. I would add fish before them, just make sure they're seahorse friendly fish (there are many kinds) and make sure the tank is big enough to accommodate the seahorses and tankmates. I would think that a 36 gallon would be fine for a pair and a couple non-seahorse fish.

Also, species matters. Probably the easier to care for are Hippocampus erectus. I don't want to say they're bullet-proof, but they are definitely the most gregarious and least prone to refuse food.

Finally, one thing to keep in mind is that they do have a specialized died and can't go long periods without food. Which means feeding frozen mysis a 2-3 times a day, and making sure that you have a trustworthy petsitter when you go on vacation.
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Old 09-22-2011, 02:39 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamiw
I just wanted to jump in as a long time seahorse keeper and clear up some misconceptions. Seahorses, especially captive bred ones (true captive bred, not tank raised seahorses) Are not nearly as difficult as people make them out to be. Are they as easy as clownfish? No. But there are many other aquarium fish that fall under difficult before these guys.

What they are is different. They have different requirements than many saltwater fish, and if someone goes into it thinking that they'll be just like every other fish they've raised, they're not going to have any luck.

I also wanted to jump on the low flow thing. That's old knowledge, and it turned out to be incorrect. Seahorses do quite well with a brisk flow. I keep my seahorses at around a 20x turnover rate. The important thing is to protect them from intakes, give them sheltered areas, and don't have the flow blasting them directly, say a single directional powerhead.

Temperature is also turning out to be pretty critical for seahorses. Seahorses are prone to bacterial infections, and temperature helps speed up the proliferation of bacteria. So most people keep their tropical seahorses in the low 70s, which turns out to work out fine.

I do agree that you should take your time setting up the tank before getting seahorses. I recommend that anyone new to saltwater keeping, plan to wait at least six months before you get seahorses once the tank is set up, so you can get used to how a saltwater fish tank works. Its those first months you'll be the most likely to screw something up. I would add fish before them, just make sure they're seahorse friendly fish (there are many kinds) and make sure the tank is big enough to accommodate the seahorses and tankmates. I would think that a 36 gallon would be fine for a pair and a couple non-seahorse fish.

Also, species matters. Probably the easier to care for are Hippocampus erectus. I don't want to say they're bullet-proof, but they are definitely the most gregarious and least prone to refuse food.

Finally, one thing to keep in mind is that they do have a specialized died and can't go long periods without food. Which means feeding frozen mysis a 2-3 times a day, and making sure that you have a trustworthy petsitter when you go on vacation.
Id like to see some pics of yours when you get the chance!! You know alot, so i bet your seahorses are knarley
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Old 09-22-2011, 03:46 AM   #9
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Seahorses are hardy species. The hard part is feeding them because they mainly eat live food.
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Old 09-22-2011, 04:42 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Gboy66 View Post
Id like to see some pics of yours when you get the chance!! You know alot, so i bet your seahorses are knarley
How about some video?
Seahorses: feeding time - YouTube


Quote:
Originally Posted by shawnn View Post
Seahorses are hardy species. The hard part is feeding them because they mainly eat live food.
The majority of seahorses available today are captive raised, which means they are adjusted to frozen mysis shrimp. I only feed mine live as a treat.
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