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Old 08-20-2007, 01:20 AM   #11
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Dwarf Angels of Centropyge are iffy. Many use them without problems, but they can harass lionfish by chewing their fins. I have also personally seen dwarf lionfish dead from trying to swallow angels too large and getting stuck, which leaves the angel dead too. If Gurnard, they attain over a foot in length.
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Old 08-20-2007, 06:48 PM   #12
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This is a rather unfair assessment due to the fact that the aquarium industry is not able to replicate the vast richness in food concentrations available in their natural environments;
It's a very honest assessment of two decades worth of observation as well as advanced studies in the biological sciences To understand the 'bottom line' to what I am saying you would need to be familiar with molecular biology, chemistry and the role of proteins and their formation.

Considering all butterfly fish do eat coral, some not exclusive as others are, but all do nonetheless. This means there is an essential protein to that animal's health, longevity and reproductive capacities that without that protein, would end up failing over time. Often leading to premature death...even if the fish lives for 5 or 6 years...it can well still be quite premature.

The results of an absence in coral protein in their diet seems to be accumilative (such as like how increasing nitrates are in a tank). Problems may not occur until up to many years have past in accumilation to this deprivation of an essencial protein.

In my honest opinion, butterfly fish are really poor fish for captive care and best left in the ocean.

And...BTW...we CAN replicate "the vast richness in food concentrations available in their natural environments". Coral are amazing creatures when it comes to replication and most can do quite well in captivity. They are very propagatable.

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We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

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Old 08-20-2007, 07:43 PM   #13
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Stop the game of "One up" now. Stick to the OP's question. None of us are molecular biologists so quit trying to dazzle us with brilliance. If you two want to continue to impress each other then take it private.
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Old 08-20-2007, 09:51 PM   #14
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Stop the game of "One up" now. Stick to the OP's question. None of us are molecular biologists so quit trying to dazzle us with brilliance. If you two want to continue to impress each other then take it private.
Sorry if you are taking this the wrong way, but isn't this a place for people to teach as well as learn? Molecular biology is just as much a part of aquarium and fish care as it is any other animal care, so what is wrong with teaching this aspect? Because of the valueable information I decided to post the info. on this thread, rather than PM, and this thread does address a question about butterfly fish. It's all for the good of helping people learn. The more they know, the better they become successful in the upkeep of their aquariums. Isn't that why we are here?
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We, as a people, know so much more about outer space than we do about our own oceans. This lack of knowledge can very well spell the dangers that lay in wait for us.

The oceans surely would swallow us before a rock comes down to smite the planet of it's life.
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Old 08-20-2007, 10:05 PM   #15
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That is why some of us are here....some others are here to feed their own egos. Molecular biology is not part of the typical hobbiest knowledge base. Nor does it need to be.

I dont believe you have anything else to really contribute to this thread. I am not going to argue this point with you.
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