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Old 12-08-2013, 06:53 PM   #11
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Yes from when I had my old tank. When I brought this new tank second hand, the guy gave me lots of things to grow my own. Maybe do this in the future. First I'd just like to keep the ones I get alive!!!

Have you got any advice ??
If you're not using co2 you should stick to simple low light plants. Anubias, Java fern, Java moss, Crypts. Stuff like that. Otherwise your plants will probably wilt and die on you.
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Old 12-08-2013, 07:25 PM   #12
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Cheers. Thank you for this. I have masses of info spinning round in my mind! Let's hope some of it makes sense
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Old 12-08-2013, 08:33 PM   #13
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Cheers. Thank you for this. I have masses of info spinning round in my mind! Let's hope some of it makes sense
By the way where did you get the wood for your tank? I would not recommend collecting "wild" wood. Buy mopani, manzanita, or malaysian drift wood from your pet store.

It's all very straightforward . No need to get confused.

1. Set tank up (apply background, put stand together, put tank on stand, rinse gravel/sand and pour in, add water, dechlorinate water, install filter and heater. Wait a little while for heater to adjust to water temperature, then turn filter and heater on. Decorate aquarium. Install plants.

2. Cycle aquarium. Either use ammonia from a bottle or just get some cycled biomedia from somebody else (another forum user who lives nearby, a friend, the fish store) and put it in your filter. Getting cycled media from another tank and putting it in your tank is the easiest way to kickstart a new tank. This way you'll be able to add fish right away whereas if you added ammonia from a bottle it could take a month.

3. Once your tank is cycled, start to add fish

4. Feed fish (not too much)

5. Do an (at least) weekly water change. Vaccuum waste off of the sand/gravel. Dechlorinate new water and add to the tank

You'll need a master test kit. Most people use the API freshwater master test kit. You'll want to monitor your ammonia/nitrite/nitrate.
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Old 12-09-2013, 02:10 AM   #14
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I am new and in the middle of my cycle its best to do a fishless cycle. its less stress on the fish and once its cycled you can add all your fish at once with a fish cycle you have to add a couple here and there and can take forever to properly cycle your tank
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Old 12-09-2013, 02:26 AM   #15
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Here is how I am doing my fishless cycle. I got some media from local guy to help it go faster.

Add enough ammonia to get to abt 4PPM if its a smallish tank 3 PPM will work. Test for start abt every other day as it will take a few days to start up. Do not do anything to the tank until the ammonia drops to 0. When it does, dose the tank again to 2 ppm. You don't need to worry about nitrites or nitrates until the ammonia hits 0 - when it does, test for nitrites. When your nitrites hit 0, test for nitrates. Dose it again to 2 ppm each time the ammonia drops to 0. Continue doing that until you have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites and are showing nitrates. When you have those readings 24 hours after your last dose of ammonia, your tank is cycled (do the dosing and testing for one more day, just to be sure you're cycled). Do a big water change to get the nitrates to 10 or less and add your fish. If you aren't ready to add fish at that time, just keep up the dosing regimen until you're ready and do the big water change.
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Old 12-09-2013, 02:50 AM   #16
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All good advice so far.

I would like to comment on the "wild" wood. All of the driftwood I use in both of my freshwater planted tanks aside from 2 pieces have been collected from my local river. As long as it's well weathered and not soft or rotting it's fine to use.

There are two schools of thought on cycling a tank and I have links to very nice articles describing both of them. While they both require you to be attentive the fishless cycle seems to be far less stressful, both for the fish and the hobbyist. However the fish in cycle negates that 1 - 2 month period of a tank not having any fish in it.

Fishless:
The (almost) Complete Guide and FAQ to Fishless Cycling

Fish In:
Fish-in Cycling: Step over into the dark side - Aquarium Advice

As for plants what was suggested are some nice guidelines. Anubias, Java moss, Java Fern, bolbitis, some crypts and possibly an amazon sword are all decent choices.
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Old 12-10-2013, 03:15 PM   #17
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Cheers thank you for this info x
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Old 12-10-2013, 03:17 PM   #18
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Hi there. I've been looking into getting some moss balls after reading up on them. They grow quite big from what I've read. Do the fish like eating them? My tank is 180 litres, should I get one or several ??
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Old 12-12-2013, 01:48 PM   #19
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Hi there. I've been looking into getting some moss balls after reading up on them. They grow quite big from what I've read. Do the fish like eating them? My tank is 180 litres, should I get one or several ??
I have one. It is a nice touch of green. My guppies and shrimp love it. They don't really eat it, just the micro organisms that collect on it.
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Old 12-12-2013, 02:07 PM   #20
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I have one. It is a nice touch of green. My guppies and shrimp love it. They don't really eat it, just the micro organisms that collect on it.
Cheers thanks for the info
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