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Old 05-04-2013, 08:41 AM   #501
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early part of the article articulates the reasons why 400-500 is important to most corals.

Note that royal blue and blue LEDs are in the 450nm range, so will NOT cover the 400-425/435nm range. Thus the need for violets.

now the LEDs they measured were properties for the SPECIFIC LEDS they measured, NOT for all LEDs. so you have to read the fine details on LEDs you want to buy. the spectral spread from the peak spectrum assume it to be 10nm from center either side, and not more as LEDs have very narrow spectrum output. That's where care needs to be I think.

Red spectrum article is from the same magazine, feb. 2013 edition feature article. long article, it wasn't the central part of the experiment they were doing, but a by-product, and very educational. Again, you have to read carefully.
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Old 05-04-2013, 03:25 PM   #502
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Well, how do you explain the growth and coloration I am getting? Supposedly, I don't have any of the light necessary to do so.
I have a fixture with violet LEDs in it and saw no difference in growth or color. I removed it and run all straight blues and whites. Either these Bridgelux LEDs are full spectrum, or the extra colors are completely unnecessary. Since red is most likely filtered out by the time light reaches 25 feet below the water surface, I am leaning towards the latter.

As for halides being more intense than LEDs, I find this also hard to believe since You can bleach corals with 100 watts of LED, but you will brown out coral with 100 watts of halide.
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Old 05-04-2013, 10:32 PM   #503
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you can get the growth with just blue. I never said nor did these articles say you can't. It may not be the best growth, depending on the specific type of corals. the articles are specific on what corals does best with what. I have coloration on my corals. It is that they are not as good as the under the other lights.

It is quite ok to be happy with just blues. I am glad you are Mr. X. Just stating here 1) the thoroughly researched findings, and 2) my personal preference and experience with my zoas under different sets of lights. Because I know they can look better than what I already have, I want to improve on it, at some point in time when I get to building my DIY LED light.

It's about knowing the choices available, and personal preferences. It's a good philosophy to be happy with what you have! This is not sarcasm. Get the corals and lights that work best for you.
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Old 05-05-2013, 11:22 AM   #504
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Well, my ongoing research clearly shows that you can get just as good coloration without violet and red LEDs. According to your article, blue is what most influences corals.
I'm just stating this so people know that they do not need the other colors.

From your article-
Surely, coral fluorescence is one of the main factors to provide a reef tank's beauty, but the light in the 400-500nm range also has other importance: it is the most optimal light to promote marine photosynthesis. Therefore this part of the spectrum is of utmost importance for a reef tank.


and-
This conclusion matches well with the experimental research in this field [16]. Fragments of Acropora millepora colony were maintained for six weeks under comparable amounts of red, green, and blue light. The conclusion of the article is that "the enhancement of coral pigmentation is primarily dependent on the blue component of the spectrum and regulated at the transcriptional level," and "light-driven accumulation of GFP-like proteins observed upon green light exposure is likely due to residual blue light passing the green filter." The experiments also revealed that radiation in the 430nm range is most efficient in promoting the protective bright coloration of the corals:

And from the article, about intensity-
LEDs are about twice more efficient than conventional fluorescent tubes or Metal Halide bulbs in converting the electric energy into light.
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Old 05-05-2013, 11:57 AM   #505
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Here's that article I mentioned earlier-
Ultraviolet Light, Marine Aquariums and Coral Reef Aquarium Tank, Stand, Canopy, and Aquarium Filter System
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Old 05-05-2013, 03:34 PM   #506
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Mr X, I think you've done a wonderful job giving thousands of advice to people on this forum on LED lights and lighting in general although I do not know the source of your knowledge.

Now I keep saying LOOK AT THE SPECTRUM of your blue lights. The articles I indicated and in countless scientific articles on corals say, corals like 400-500nm most.

Now take a look at the lights you have, taotronics: their blue, and royal blues as per the manufacturer, states: 450-470nm or 460-470nm, meaning the PEAK nm is 460 or 465nm. It is MISSING the entire lower HALF of the range corals like. Due to the narrow spectrum bandwidth of LEDs, the light fall-off from peak spectrum of 460-470 would be DRASTIC. i.e. those Tao blues would NOT emit anything below 450 or 440. ANYTHING below 440nm.

Here's a link to the TaoTronics 120w listing in amazon, and searching for the same in ebay will give you the specs on the blue LEDs, and what their spectrum output is.
Amazon.com: TaoTronics TT-AL09 Dimmable Aquarium Coral Reef LED Grow Light (120W Output, Blue/White Ratio- 28:27; Two-Year Warranty): Pet Supplies.

And again, I am NOT prescribing UV lights. NO, so why do you keep talking about UV lights. I am speaking of violet spectrum. Here's NASA's definition of Violet spectrum: "The visible violet light has a wavelength of about 400 nm."
Ultra-Violet, or UV has a spectrum below 400nm to 10nm. NASA's definition of BLUE light is 475nm.

What Wavelength Goes With a Color?

Here is Wikipedia's definition of Violet (and the link below)
380-450nm.
Visible spectrum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. In an article on UV, it shows UV as being 400nm-10nm, same as NASA definition (Ultraviolet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


I'm not making any effort to put you down, nor your advice. I'm just trying to add to the knowledge base here. Blues are quite fine for corals, as Mr X and others will attest to. BLUE spectrum by definition is 475nm. What corals like is 400-500nm range. The math is fairly simple and clear. I would think corals are fine with 475. Would they be happier if they got 400-440nm as well? I would think so!

If you want to give your corals the full bandwidth of spectrum they like, add VIOLET, NOT UV.

It's pretty cut and clear here. I'm speaking of VIOLET, NOT UV. I hope that's clear.
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Old 05-05-2013, 03:46 PM   #507
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayinaung View Post
I think if you got MH then most of your spectrum needs are covered including UV because MH IS full spectrum.
This post led me to believe you are speaking as if UV is necessary.
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Old 05-05-2013, 04:30 PM   #508
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You have taken me out of context, and you would have seen that it was in DIRECT RESPONSE to the specific lights Raheel was talking about, the popular nomenclature for violets:

Quote:
Originally Posted by raheelahmed View Post
i am trying to copy rapidled.com for 75gallon tank kit.
rapidled pecs are
18 Cool White
20 Royal Blue
6 Violet UV LEDs
2 Red
2 Green

rapidled kit cost $450, & my project should be completed in under $200 (GU10 led project)
To which I responded as this immediagely:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayinaung View Post
Hey raheel, the flood project looks great. give us an update once you got it all together.

On the other project - who's the manufacturer and can you PM me the details? I'm thinking of doing a DIY myself and this might fit the bill.

Raheel just one more thought on this - one thing about LEDs is the narrow spectrum range they have (unlike other lights) so you might want to supplement your blues with a few of the reds, cyan, green, pink, UV and IR. I found the white LEDs to be quite intense vs blues and can tend to wash out the colors that florescent corals give out, from what I've seen visiting other people's tanks. Tanks with lesser white LEDs and supplemented by other non-blue LEDs tend to bring out more colors in their corals. This makes sense since well, colors we see are what the object does not absorb....
So, it was pretty clear! I was responding to THIS "UV LEDs" that Raheel is looking at, which the commercial supplier has called it "UV" though they are only Violet, as I had been stating earlier, and in other posts in the forum. I was saying have some of THAT "Violet UV Led", not "UV" in general.

And if you had been READING how I began on the light spectrum, a few posts earlier, I had always stated the spectrum requirements, and how the commercial popular LEDs always talk about violet LEDs as UV. Which is what Raheel is refering to.

There's always a context of direct response to a particular piece of conversation, and that is not to be taken out of context. Just as your simple insistence on blue as all that corals need that does not mean that you're ignorant on the full spectrum needs or corals, or does it Mr X?

Taking snippets out of context is easy way of misleading others and misusing someone else's statements. Which does not constitute as being "nice" nor correct.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:34 PM   #509
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You can definitely grow colorful stony corals with just the blue LEDs that are installed in the Taotronics fixtures. It's a fact. I'm doing it. You definitely do not need any other colors. It's a fact. I'm doing it.
That's all I've been trying to say all along, and you are disagreeing with me. It doesn't matter to me that you disagree, only that people know they don't need to spend the money on extra colors.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:20 PM   #510
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At times, ignore is most useful when discussions become fruitless. My thoughts, research findings, and opinions are here. Use it if you find it useful. Ignore if you don't. And thanks for your inputs.
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