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Old 01-20-2007, 04:45 PM   #11
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IMO...yes, you need more circulation and a closed loop pump system would probably be the best way to get it. You don't have to drill any extra holes in the tank although it'd be nice to have holes in the back glass for the intake and returns of a closed loop pump. Here is a link to a picture of a closed loop system all put together but not in the aquarium. http://www.melevsreef.com/plumbing/closedloop.jpg
Your suction line comes from the main tank to the intake of the pump...water is pumped back up to the tank through the returns. It does the same thing as powerheads would in the tank...but the only thing actually in the tank is some plumbing that is easliy hidden.
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Old 01-20-2007, 05:19 PM   #12
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Thanks for the pic.

I assume that this hangs on the back off the tank so to speak.

Could I add an additional internal overflow as the inlet to the closed loop system feeding back into the back of the tank via drilled holes.

If this is correct how may return holes would you sugggest I use for a 130 gallon tank to achieve a decent flow.

Thanks
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Old 01-21-2007, 01:53 AM   #13
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You could add an internal overflow to feed the closed loop, but I wouldn't for two reasons. One, most of the DOC's in the tank will be at the surface and you don't want to skim this layer of water and churn it all back up through a pump...you want that going through your sump where there is a chance some of it can be removed. Second, if your sump return pump quits for some reason, the water level in the tank is going to drop as the tank drains into the sump. If you are running the closed loop from an overflow, it will run dry in this situation and likely ruin the pump. I would either come over the top edge with the suction line or drill the back of the tank and use a bulkhead fitting with a large strainer. The reason to use a large strainer is so snails, cucumbers, anemones, ect... won't be sucked in and killed. I would split the return into at least two outlets. You really want one return blowing just under the surface of the water. This will create lots of surface turbulence and increase gas exchange. It also helps cool the tank by increasing evaporation. You can use your sump return for this...be sure to drill a siphon break in that line so the water won't siphon back through the pump in the event of a pump/power failure. If you were to use a larger pressure rated pump, you could have three outlets with two of them coming off a SQWD. The third would be valved so you could control the pressure and flow through the SQWD. This would give you more than enough flow through the tank as well as some alternating flow that would simulate wave action somewhat. The target in a reef tank is turbulence. No coral is going to do well with a pump outlet blasting it 24/7. You want changing, colliding, turbulent currents that simulate the waves crashing over the reef as closely as possible. The 180 I'm installing will have one pump (1150 gph) going into a 1" Sea Swirl which will rotate back and forth 90*. The other identical pump will go through a SQWD with outlets on opposite ends of the tank. There will be at least one 5 gal surge device and possibly two. I guess I'm writing a book here...sorry. I get carried away sometimes. But you get the idea about the currents you need to create.
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Old 01-21-2007, 06:02 AM   #14
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I really appreciate all the great advice that I am getting.

Dont worry about writing too much I need to do all the reading I can at the minute

I'm going to do some drawings tomorrow and post them up for you to have a look. If you dont mind you can tell me what you think of them and what corrections I should make.

Many Thanks
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Old 01-27-2007, 12:53 PM   #15
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Ok, I finally got round to getting the drawings done.

I'd really appreciate any feedback on my proposed system

Thanks
Attached Images
File Type: jpg tank_design_213.jpg (33.5 KB, 53 views)
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Old 01-28-2007, 02:11 PM   #16
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I think that will be fine. I assume you are going to use 3/4" bulkhead fittings for the closed loop? Be sure when you have the tank drilled that you have the holes sized for the bulkheads you want to use. A 1" bulkhead takes like a 1 7/8" hole...or something about that size...I can't remember the exact sizes. I'd order my bulkheads and then have the tank drilled to fit them. Your drawing looks fine to me. If you are going to run one pump on the closed loop, I'd have 1" lines going to and coming from the pump. Then you can tee down to 3/4" when you split the line to go to the tank. Make sure you put valves on both lines so you can remove the pump if you need to. I would probably put valves in the pressure line after the tee as well so you can adjust flow. Lastly, I would either put unions in the line or, my preference, use true union valves. That way you can break the plumbing down easily. If you use unions, be sure you put them on the pump side of the shut off valves or you won't be able to remove the pump without a mess. HTH.
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