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Old 02-28-2013, 04:41 PM   #1
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Looking for led lighting.

I have looking at a lot of different led lights on ebay. Some a lot cheaper than other. So i had a look around to see what sort of specs i would need, i came across this paragraph. Is this right or is their something else i need to take into account as well


Picking the right lighting for your planted aquarium can be intimidating and confusing. There are so many options to choose from, and so many ways to measure these options. The first step to understanding full spectrum aquarium lighting is to understand what type light your plants need, and what the measurements mean.

Color temperature, measured in Kelvins, is often the easiest measure to find, after wattage. It is a measure of the overall color of the light as it appears to the human eye. Lower color temperatures appear reddish while higher temperatures appear bluish with white in the middle of the range. Often, a temperature between 5000K and 10,000K is recommended for a planted aquarium. However, two bulbs with the same color temperature may in fact be emitting very different light, some more useful to plants than others. This has to do with the different wavelengths of light, and explains why relying on color temperature alone can be misleading.

Visible light is made up of many different wavelengths, mixed together. It’s the absorption or reflection of particular wavelengths that produce colors. Plants require certain wavelengths of light to carry out photosynthesis using chlorophyll. The light that chlorophyll absorbs is used to power photosynthesis. By examining the wavelengths of light absorbed by chlorophyll, we can begin to understand the needs of our aquatic plants.

As shown above, plants need the majority of the light to be around 400-450nm and 650-675nm (or blue and red light). The blue light is used for leaf growth, and promotes bushy, compact growth, while red light is mainly used for flowering and strong stems. They reflect most green light, thus explaining why leaves are green.

Wayet‘s LED aquarium lights, Full spectrum: Blue 455nm-470nm, White 12000k-14000k, good use for aquarium lighting, coral growing, reef, etc.

Armed with this information, we know that any aquarium light will need to produce large amounts of blue and red light. Most bulb manufacturers include the spectral output graph of their products on or in the packaging. Examine this output graph and try to find a bulb that matches up with the spectral absorption graph for chlorophyll. The closer the match, the better the bulb will be for your plants. For example, the following graph is for a GE 9325K bulb.

The bulb matches up fairly well, although the spike at 600nm is not really red enough (650-675nm) for a plant to fully benefit. The blue light spike is however beneficial, and the spike in greenish-yellow light will make the bulb look bright to the human eye.

Although you may not notice a major difference between bulbs, a mix between a color temperature that you like and a spectral output that your plants like will help create healthier plants and a healthier aquarium.

Sourced from http://blog.wayet-lighting.com/2011/...nted-aquarium/
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:32 PM   #2
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What kind of a tank you got and what are the dimensions?
Those 2 things will mainly result in what you need to get. A fw planted tank is going to need completely different setup then a reef tank. Also you need strong enough LEDs to reach the bottom of your tank, so type and size of your tank is what matters most when trying to figure out what to buy.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:44 AM   #3
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Dont know why i didnt put that. 65 long, 23 width, 26 deep all inches. Its a freshwater setup.
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:31 AM   #4
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Fish only or planted?
That's a tall tank, high PARs on the bottom will take some power. I'm doing a 90 gallon planted with a truelumen pro strip and a pair of kessil Amazons.

Lighting setup with truelumen LEDs
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Old 03-01-2013, 11:58 AM   #5
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It is planted but cant keep much in there the only thing that seems to grow is java fern. Java moss wont even grow. At the moment i have two t8 tropical sun tubes which will grow plants but i dont think it has enough power to go so deep.

What is this par rating?
The lights i have been looking at are led tubes at www.novatouch.co.uk
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Old 03-01-2013, 12:21 PM   #6
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Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) is defined as the amount of radiant energy available within the approximate spectral range of 350 to 750 nm.

The deeper the tank the less intense the light will be and the less usable light the plants will get. Thats probably why you can't grow a carpet, not enough light on the bottom. The kessils are the only LEDs that will penetrate to 26", or you can go with the grobeam tiles if you got the dough.
Can't tell you anything about the lights you're looking at I don't see any tables for color temp or PAR readings.
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Old 03-01-2013, 01:04 PM   #7
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Actually, and this is only what I would do, you can get a custom LED fixture made for your tank by a reef light retailer or even a Chinese manufacturer. The reason I say that is because the market for deep penetrating LED fixtures really is dominated by reef keepers. BUT, nobody is set on the best mix of LED colors in their fixture. There are places that will sell the highly popular TaoTronics type 120w LED fixtures and allow you to custom pick any combination of light to suit your tank. You may even find some premade 120w fixtures that are designed for planted tanks on eBay. You may want to look up Reef Breeders and email them about making you a pair of custom lights. If you go with a combination of warm white, natural white, red, green and blue, you should be in plant heaven. It's just an option. There are other companies based in China that can do the same but using a US company is usually better service wise.

If you decide to try something super cheap there's always the waterproof LED daylight floodlights. 3 30w floodlights would be a huge jump in light energy over your tank and they would penetrate to the bottom with ease.
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Old 03-01-2013, 01:25 PM   #8
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I seen the custom built fixtures, I just don't want the big black boxes hanging over the tank, going with no canopy.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:16 PM   #9
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Then T5s may be the better option. LEDs that can penetrate that deep are usually either hung or installed into a tall canopy. There are a few that use 1-3 watt emitters and are built into a fixture that can go directly over a tank but they're all (that I've seen) saltwater lights and not nearly long enough for your unusual sized tank. If you can't hang them or make a canopy then T5s will be the easiest solution. You'll get way WAY more light, probably up to medium, which will let you grow a tank full of healthy plants. I'm sure there's other options. I'm just chiming in on the ones I'm familiar with.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:20 PM   #10
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The more the merrier, I always say.
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