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Old 12-30-2014, 11:57 PM   #1
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I was really unsure of where to put this thread, so please feel free to move it it necessary

This may sound like a newbie question, but bear with me...:How shallow can your water be?

I had once heard that taller or oddly shaped tanks hold less fish because the depth is not as important as the surface area, is this true? If so, is there a MINIMUM depth in which to keep your fish and/or inverts, or a maximum amount were the extra water just becomes a waste of space? ((Obviously you want to have enough water so it is fully submerged and able to move about))

I am thinking in particular about rack type systems or fry growing tanks where you may be using bins...how shallow is too shallow?

I am always very curious about these kinds of concepts, so I was wondering if anyone here may be willing/able to explain it to me.

Hope that wasn't too confusing!

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Old 12-31-2014, 07:28 AM   #2
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Tank Water Depth

Hello Kas...

As long as the fish have sufficient room to swim up and down and back and forth, the depth can be whatever you want. If you have very small fish, they'll be fine in 6 inches of water. I have a 55 gallon tank with roughly 6 inches of water in it for the benefit of emersed land plants that need their leaves to stick out of the water. I have Guppies in it and they do fine in shallow water. Schooling fish like Tetras, would need deeper water. Consider the the environment the fish require and go from there.

You're right about the surface area of a tank. Because of the added surface area, a short, long tank provides a better means of getting oxygen into the tank water and carbon dioxide out, than the same sized tank that's tall and narrow.


"Fear not, my young apprentice. Just change the tank water."
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Old 12-31-2014, 11:51 AM   #3
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Thanks B!
I am always interested in the science behind things, so thank you for your thorough answer!
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tan, tank

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