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-   -   Which tank do I want? (http://www.aquariumadvice.com/forums/f14/which-tank-do-i-want-22981.html)

gear-head 05-14-2004 04:21 PM

Which tank do I want?
 
I have enough space in my office for 36" of tank length so the largest I can get in there appear to be:

50g 36"x18"x18"
38g 36"x12"x20"
(no taller than since I have shelves on the wall above where it will go)

So either the 50g or the 38g.

The only question I have is, what are the advantages of the 12" width show tank, vs. the 18" wider model, other than more gallons.

Do fish do better with more depth or is it just a personal preferrence issue?

Are wider tanks easier to aquascape?

RocketSeason 05-14-2004 04:37 PM

Some people claim that the water circulation is better with the more narrow tanks. (that is if you put the intake at one end and the output at the other) However, I have found that the cirulation in deeper tanks can still be quite good. The advantage of a deeper tank is that fish have more area for them to move in, Which results in less "traffic" and less stress on the fish.

IMO

OhTheHumanity 05-14-2004 10:23 PM

Here is something that I have heard. The larger the tank the more drops of water it has. Ok if you have say 12 oz cup of water and you put 1 drop of ammonia in it the toxicity is higher than say a bath tub with 1 drop in it.

Though it's more to take care of I think you may have a little more time to react with that extra 12 gallons of water.

Not to mention Rocket's reason of more real estate per fish. I don't want to rube my neighbors shoulder evertime I walk by his house... lol

darb2 05-15-2004 05:23 AM

I think the deeper tank allow more flexibility with aquascaping. not to mention a more stable system

phases99 05-20-2004 11:09 PM

I have a 46g bow that is 36w x 18h. If you like a more modern look.

Brisc0 05-21-2004 01:39 PM

Just make sure and check your headroom on a tall tank. I didn't think about it when I got my 105G tall and I only have about 1.5 feet between the top of the tank and the low ceilings in my basement. So when its time to work on the tank I gotta pull out the ladder and do a lot of yoga moves to work on it. :mrgreen:

hockeydude15 05-21-2004 09:06 PM

i have a 38 gal and a 50 gal although the 38 is a perfect size and very convenient. I think its more personal preference in this case especially since it will be in your office. Also you would be surprised how much more money that you spend with that extra 12 gal (compared to a 38)

Brisc0 05-21-2004 10:17 PM

Thats no joke, most people say $30.00 per gallon, man I curse the day I got reefcon pro and added all my expenses! Im chugging along around $52.00G :?
Of course, once that bug bites you, you live with the sting LoL

mrpope 05-21-2004 11:29 PM

Its not just a question of deepness. The fact is that a larger tank (volume) is more foregiving. OhTheHumanity is completely right saying that more water means better chance of controling toxins that emerge. But also remember, if you are planning on a reef tank, a deeper aquarium means stronger light, and the price of lighting goes up greatly with a bigger (especially deeper) tank.

fishfreek 05-22-2004 10:32 AM

Always shoot for the tank with the most surface area for gas exchange. If the two tanks are tied for surface area. THen pick the tank thats got the most room front to back.

50Gal - 11664 sq Inches
38Gal - 8640 sq Inches


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