Scissortail dartfish – Ptereleotris evides

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The Blackfin dartfish or Scissortail Goby is from the Indo-Pacific region where it is found in outer reef slopes, lagoons and bays at depth of 10 to 50 feet. Adults are usually found in…

Species name: Ptereleotris evides
Common names: Blackfin dartfish, Scissortail Goby
Family: Ptereleotridae (Dartfishes)
Order: Perciformes (perch-likes)
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Maximum length: 5.5 in.
Minimum tank size: 30 gallon
Hardiness: Easy. This is a durable species that will quickly adjust to a community aquarium that contains other passive species.
Aggressiveness: Peaceful but will fight with its own kind unless they are a mated pair.
Reef Compatibility:
Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Line and Society islands, north to the Ryukyu and Ogasawara islands, south to New South Wales, Lord Howe Island, and Rapa.
Diet: Feeds on zooplankton. Diet should include chopped or shaved seafood, bloodworms, brine shrimp, and mysid shrimp. Feed a few times a day

Additional information:
The Blackfin dartfish or Scissortail Goby is from the Indo-Pacific region where it is found in outer reef slopes, lagoons and bays at depth of 10 to 50 feet. Adults are usually found in pairs and juveniles in small aggregations.
It has a white head and blue body with large dorsal and anal fins. It also have large dark gray dorsal and anal fins with black edging.

It like to burrow under rocks in the sand, but spend most of its time in open water cruising for food. rather than retreat to its burrow like most of its kind, it prefer to swims away from danger.

The ideal aquarium should have a temperature of 72 to 78ºF with a specific gravity of 1.020 to 1.025, a pH between 8.1 and 8.4, moderate lighting and moderate current. It requires ample swimming room, a sand bottom plenty of loose coral rubble for burrowing, and a tight-fitting lid to prevent it from jumping out of the tank. It should be kept in pairs or groups, and can be housed with other Gobies.

Article source: http://www.aquariumslife.com

Filed under Fish Profiles, Saltwater.