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Old 06-04-2013, 07:15 PM   #1
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Wild bluegill

I have a 26 gallon bowfront that's empty and a creek over at my parents full of bluegill and small mouth bass and other fish I don't care about. Anyways I want to put some bluegill or smallmouth bass in there. And when they get to big my parents also have a 2 acre pond.
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:42 PM   #2
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I have a 26 gallon bowfront that's empty and a creek over at my parents full of bluegill and small mouth bass and other fish I don't care about. Anyways I want to put some bluegill or smallmouth bass in there. And when they get to big my parents also have a 2 acre pond.
I'm sorry, when I think bluegill, I think lunch. I'm from WI and my Dad and I used to fish for bluegill, sunfish, perch, etc.
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:44 PM   #3
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Unfortunately it's a little more difficult than you make it sound, first comes the legal issues of keeping fish under the minimum size requirements.

Secondly it's extremely tough to transition wild caught fish over to commercial foods, it's not uncommon they will actually starve themselves to death prior to eating flakes, pellets, or whatever else your offering.

Lastly the tank is far to small to accommodate any of the fish your asking about, no matter how small they are.

A quick google search would have yielding all that information.
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:46 PM   #4
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Unfortunately it's a little more difficult than you make it sound, first comes the legal issues of keeping fish under the minimum size requirements.

Secondly it's extremely tough to transition wild caught fish over to commercial foods, it's not uncommon they will actually starve themselves to death prior to eating flakes, pellets, or whatever else your offering.

Lastly the tank is far to small to accommodate any of the fish your asking about, no matter how small they are.
Okay thanks if they got to upset I could move them but I won't try it and I would get ear wigs to feed them
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:52 PM   #5
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Okay thanks if they got to upset I could move them but I won't try it and I would get ear wigs to feed them
Feeding some random insects does not provide enough nutrition to be beneficial, there is far more that goes into a wild caught fishes diet than some bugs. You obviously need to spend some time actually researching this and decide what's best for the fish as opposed to what strikes your fancy today.
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Old 06-04-2013, 08:12 PM   #6
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Feeding some random insects does not provide enough nutrition to be beneficial, there is far more that goes into a wild caught fishes diet than some bugs. You obviously need to spend some time actually researching this and decide what's best for the fish as opposed to what strikes your fancy today.
I know what they eat I was just suggesting that as part of their diet but I also was thinking that they will create more waste and probably be harder to keep than the normal aquarium fish.
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Old 06-04-2013, 08:47 PM   #7
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If you know all about these fish and their diet then why bother posting, is it just to keep racking up the post count?
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Old 06-04-2013, 09:02 PM   #8
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If you know all about these fish and their diet then why bother posting, is it just to keep racking up the post count?
No it was to make sure I wasn't overlooking things I don't know what their space requirements were and filtration and things like that I know about the fish and what it eats in the wild I was unsure about the captivity aspect.
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Old 06-04-2013, 09:49 PM   #9
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All I have to say is c'mon...If you live in the midwest, you KNOW the size of a bluegill or bass, I've seen smallies well over 10"...Would you keep an oscar in a 29 gallon, a peacock bass? No. Sunfish (which includes bluegill, bass, etc.) are the North American equivalent of cichlid species like these. They are aggressive, large fish, that require large tanks that are kept cool year round. They may not be as large, or as aggressive as some of the central american cichlid species, but they still won't survive, let alone thrive, in a tank under 55 gallons, and even that is pushing it
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Old 06-04-2013, 10:55 PM   #10
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All I have to say is c'mon...If you live in the midwest, you KNOW the size of a bluegill or bass, I've seen smallies well over 10"...Would you keep an oscar in a 29 gallon, a peacock bass? No. Sunfish (which includes bluegill, bass, etc.) are the North American equivalent of cichlid species like these. They are aggressive, large fish, that require large tanks that are kept cool year round. They may not be as large, or as aggressive as some of the central american cichlid species, but they still won't survive, let alone thrive, in a tank under 55 gallons, and even that is pushing it
Yes but like I said I would catch them from a creek in my parents yard about 2-3" make sure they are healthy and release them into a pond
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Old 06-04-2013, 11:00 PM   #11
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I don't see the point in doing this? Just go buy fish that will be able to live their entire life in that 29 gallon, not a species that grows fast and hits good sized lengths. Not to mention if you do happen to get it to start feeding off pellets (as you won't be able to replicate it's true diet, as HUKIT stated), then you are going to basically domesticate it and doom it once you release it. It will lose its natural fear of predators as it will learn to adjust to you as a food supplier and thus not seen larger animals as the threat that they are.
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:48 AM   #12
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Yes but like I said I would catch them from a creek in my parents yard about 2-3" make sure they are healthy and release them into a pond
I grew up in the Midwest and caught these with my dad. If you want to populate your parents pond then just do that, but please keep the bluegills out of a tank. It makes no sense to try domesticate them and put them in a small tank. Because you think it's cool to show your friends? Not fair to the fish. They will be terrified the whole time. Not cool.

Next you'll be saying you want to try domesticating Northern Pike or some ridiculous thing.
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Old 06-05-2013, 02:12 AM   #13
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I grew up in the Midwest and caught these with my dad. If you want to populate your parents pond then just do that, but please keep the bluegills out of a tank. It makes no sense to try domesticate them and put them in a small tank. Because you think it's cool to show your friends? Not fair to the fish. They will be terrified the whole time. Not cool.

Next you'll be saying you want to try domesticating Northern Pike or some ridiculous thing.
Ya that's another apart out at my parents property In one of the barns I want to make a big plywood tank every so often we catch a sunfish or something with a huge red blister on it and I want a medical tank so the pond management people can see it. And the pond is filled with large mouth and catfish.
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Old 06-05-2013, 02:38 PM   #14
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Honestly if you are worried about the health and integrity of the fish species itself. I would wait until I caught a bluegill with the lesion on it and skip the "medical tank" idea altogether and just call the local fisheries office to report it. Let them take care of it from there. It makes no sense for you to risk your health to a possible bacterial pathogen that is of unknown origin, many a times these fish lesions are led to a bigger problem than you can imagine. I may sound like I am blowing it out of proportion but in honesty. Your best bet is to keep the gamefish out of a tank for your own safety.
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Old 06-05-2013, 03:07 PM   #15
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Honestly if you are worried about the health and integrity of the fish species itself. I would wait until I caught a bluegill with the lesion on it and skip the "medical tank" idea altogether and just call the local fisheries office to report it. Let them take care of it from there. It makes no sense for you to risk your health to a possible bacterial pathogen that is of unknown origin, many a times these fish lesions are led to a bigger problem than you can imagine. I may sound like I am blowing it out of proportion but in honesty. Your best bet is to keep the gamefish out of a tank for your own safety.
Okay as I'd right now my brother killed one that was covered in boils because we had no way of transporting it to the fish place. No airstone or bucket at at the time. Does that mean swimming in the pond could be dangerous ?
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Old 06-05-2013, 03:18 PM   #16
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It is okay if the fish is dead. It should still be reported to the local fish/wildlife authorities. A dead or alive fish won't make a bit of difference to them when it comes to pathogen identification. Now, I am making the assumption that this is not the first fish that has been caught with a lesion? If this is correct...do yourself a favor and refrain from swimming in that particular body of water until the pathogen is identified.
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