Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Freshwater > Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 05-25-2020, 09:12 AM   #1
Aquarium Advice Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 4
Bettas

I continue to go through Bettas for my little guy. I get a new tank (3 gal this time with a filter), I add him after the temps are equalized, and he lasts about a couple weeks. Usually after about 3-4 days the water is cloudy, with plumes of white clouds, which eventually clears a little. The first signs are that he hides away and is not active, then stops eating, then is belly up.

Any advice on what I can do to stop this?
__________________

__________________
slipperysalmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2020, 09:43 AM   #2
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 24
Hi. How often are we doing water changes? Even with a filter you need to be doing water changes.
__________________

__________________
dartzy2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2020, 09:46 AM   #3
Aquarium Advice Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 4
It happens right after i fill a new tank. You should't have to do a change right away?
__________________
slipperysalmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2020, 09:50 AM   #4
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Aiken Drum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Derbyshire, UK
Posts: 271
How are you cycling the tank? Do you know about the nitrogen cycle?
__________________
Aiken Drum
Aiken Drum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2020, 10:01 AM   #5
Aquarium Advice Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 4
How would I cycle a 3gal tank for a Betta because I'm pretty sure it's a water quality issue.
__________________
slipperysalmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2020, 10:03 AM   #6
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Aiken Drum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Derbyshire, UK
Posts: 271
Did you cycle the tank? Do you know about the nitrogen cycle?

I agree, it is a water quality issue and I strongly suspect its because you havent cycled the aquarium.
__________________
Aiken Drum
Aiken Drum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2020, 10:21 AM   #7
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
Aiken Drum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Derbyshire, UK
Posts: 271
Do you have a fish in the tank at moment?

Do you have a water test kit? Do you know your water parameters. pH? Ammonia? Nitrite? Nitrate?
__________________
Aiken Drum
Aiken Drum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2020, 07:33 PM   #8
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
KaylNeko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 760
Also, are you treating the water with Prime or another brand of water conditioner? Chlorine and chloramine in tap water will kill them pretty quick.
__________________
100g planted community tank
75g planted goldfish tank
29g planted betta community tank
5g planted Betta tank
KaylNeko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2020, 06:16 AM   #9
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
fishingBuds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Florida
Posts: 138
The thing is, betta can survive in 3g tank, i have one living in a 3g tank for 1 month for now, i don't do water changes frequently, water always clear.
How? U ask me...
The only thing I have in this tank is fertilizer substrate and 1 Amazon sword, which was dying and now it is ok again.
I was used to do a lot of water changes before adding the plants and snails. Try to do the same thing. betta fish are suppose to be able to live inside a small tank, but let's try not to abuse the fish, and give him a nice home.
__________________
fishingBuds is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 09:02 AM   #10
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
HannahJo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Iowa, USA
Posts: 123
They can live in small spaces within reason. Just because they can survive in bad conditions doesn't mean they should. Like I said, they still need basic fish care. Water changes are a must- no excuses. And as far as water conditioning... If you are using tap water that contains chlorine- you are killing you fish.
__________________
#72G
Platys, Tetras, Mollies, Bettas, BN Plecos
#Turtle Pond
Red Eared Slider
HannahJo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 10:44 AM   #11
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
fishingBuds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Florida
Posts: 138
For sure you are right, good clean water, parameters is ofc essential but the space doesnt need to be big. So the problem is 90% of the cases not the size of the tank but the time you put into it
__________________
fishingBuds is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 12:13 PM   #12
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
fishingBuds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Florida
Posts: 138
Exactly, always treat your water

if you are using tap water, test it before add the conditioner, so you can control how much u using per gallon.

Also, I use Wonder Shells in small low tech tanks, they removes chlorine instantly, purify the water, clears cloudy water due to overfeeding/increase oxygen dissolution and add calcium to the water (good for snails and shrimps + fish bones). Also, they are pretty much affordable but I wouldn't prioritize it, because you will have to use them every water change.

I can say that the more you keep this hobby, the more you will do the right thing and get perspective/notion
__________________
fishingBuds is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 09:17 PM   #13
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Fizzler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 28
You seem to have gotten the answers to your questions on cloudy water. In my personal experience while I was doing my fish less cycle(which took 7 weeks before I could add fish to my 29 gallon) the white cloudy water was due to a bacteria bloom. This bloom resolved itself with no damage because I had no fish inside my tank. At that point the only living thing inside my tank were various fern species. Once my water hit 0 nitrite, 0ammonia, and a safe level of nitrate I had 40ppm I went along and added fish. Iíve only lost one corydora and that was due to disease he acquired at the pet store. All
Other fish and shrimp are thriving. Donít feel on defense when people throw you advice as I have gotten a lot of help through these forums. Good luck and I hope your fish start to live and give you healthy entertainment!
__________________
Fizzler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2020, 10:36 AM   #14
Aquarium Advice Addict
Community Moderator
 
Autumnsky's Avatar



POTM Champion
Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Northern Colorado, USA
Posts: 14,465
OP - the tank needs the water to stay in the safe zone. Getting a cycled tank can be a way to manage a small tank. Otherwise doing water changes every other day / or every 3 days, or when tested and the parameters are found in the unsafe zone.

Check into using Hikari Bio Gold food, it doesn't cloud the water. Good basic nutrition.

Food can cloud up a tank fast.

Caution to over feeding. It can cause bad water quality and clouding.

The article link getting started, in my signature, is a very good resource to help learn building blocks for new tank, fish keeping. By having that help a Betta can live several years!"
__________________
FW & SW
Favorite tank right now - 12G Edge nano fish

New to FW fish? First tank in a long time or EVER??? Need some info on keeping fish?
Start here - Aquarium Advice Article
https://www.aquariumadvice.com/guide...ater-aquarium/
Autumnsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2020, 01:31 PM   #15
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 136
The problem is:
1) the tank is not cycled. That throws the parametres off, causes them to fluctuate and will almost certainly eventually kill the fish, especially if you don't keep the water changes up (in the case of a fish-in cycle, the changes have to be done pretty much every day). A tank takes on average about 6 weeks to cycle and only once the cycle is done is it safe to add fish.
2) the tank is too small. Paradoxically, the smaller the tank, the more difficult it is to maintain and keep water parametres stable. Nano tanks are usually recommended for more advanced keepers, beginners fare better with bigger aquariums as they are more forgiving and have a bigger margin of error. Things like temperature, ammonia, nitrites can fluctuate wildly in such a small volume of water, and that can severely stress or even kill the fish.
Solutions: Get a bigger tank (5gal minimum, the bigger the better) along with a heater and filter, read about the nitrogen cycle, let the aquarium run without any animals for a few weeks until the bacterial colony establishes itself and the parametres stabilize, then test the water for ammonia, nitrites & nitrates (or ask your lfs to do it for you) and once you get good results you can add fish. I'm sorry but there's no other way around it. Once you get the hang of it it will be a very rewarding experience, but if you try to take shortcuts you will just end up stressing or killing every new animal you get. Patience is your ally, my friend
__________________
Enchantress is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2020, 11:10 PM   #16
Aquarium Advice Activist
 
fishingBuds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Florida
Posts: 138
Best answer until now
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enchantress View Post
The problem is:
1) the tank is not cycled. That throws the parametres off, causes them to fluctuate and will almost certainly eventually kill the fish, especially if you don't keep the water changes up (in the case of a fish-in cycle, the changes have to be done pretty much every day). A tank takes on average about 6 weeks to cycle and only once the cycle is done is it safe to add fish.
2) the tank is too small. Paradoxically, the smaller the tank, the more difficult it is to maintain and keep water parametres stable. Nano tanks are usually recommended for more advanced keepers, beginners fare better with bigger aquariums as they are more forgiving and have a bigger margin of error. Things like temperature, ammonia, nitrites can fluctuate wildly in such a small volume of water, and that can severely stress or even kill the fish.
Solutions: Get a bigger tank (5gal minimum, the bigger the better) along with a heater and filter, read about the nitrogen cycle, let the aquarium run without any animals for a few weeks until the bacterial colony establishes itself and the parametres stabilize, then test the water for ammonia, nitrites & nitrates (or ask your lfs to do it for you) and once you get good results you can add fish. I'm sorry but there's no other way around it. Once you get the hang of it it will be a very rewarding experience, but if you try to take shortcuts you will just end up stressing or killing every new animal you get. Patience is your ally, my friend
__________________

__________________
fishingBuds is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
betta, bettas

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
bettas!bettas!bettas! allaboutfish Show Off/Photography 51 06-22-2011 05:06 PM
Bettas Bettas Bettas!!! Nippyfish Show Off/Photography 5 01-13-2005 03:14 PM
female bettas and Male bettas together? RocketSeason Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 5 12-26-2004 11:35 PM
Proper Housing/care for Bettas ConanTheLibraia Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 12 05-09-2003 01:07 PM
Couple bettas bettacove Show Off/Photography 4 05-04-2003 11:30 PM







» Photo Contest Winners







All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.