Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Freshwater > Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 02-07-2012, 10:38 PM   #1
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
alli.knight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 36
Nitrates in tap water?

Hey everybody. I haven't been able to get my nitrates under 40-80 ppm (I have a really hard time telling the colors apart. They look so similar...) so I decided to test my tap water. It tested the same 40-80 ppm. What am I supposed to do about this? Am I just testing wrong? I follow the instructions exactly and bang the second bottle again my palm while I shake it for a long time. If the nitrates in my tap water really are that high, then what?

__________________
alli.knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 01:41 AM   #2
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Terrance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,577
I would setup an algae turf scrubber. It's very good to reduce all your nitrates to 0. You will have to go longer without water changes, so add supplemental minerals to the water for your fishes health.

An easier alternative would be putting fast growing plants in your tank to reduce nitrates. It will get messy though. You could also use pond matrix as part of your filtration.

Your area got some serious problems.. Find a way to fix it.
__________________
Kind Regards,
Terrance
Terrance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 07:41 AM   #3
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,706
Do you have access to a well?
__________________
I support the right to arm bears.
blert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 08:13 AM   #4
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
adadkins1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Morristown, TN
Posts: 1,762
I'd recommend putting in some good plants like Hornwort and Dwarf Water Lettuce. They would help in reducing the nitrates.

By the way, I don't see how using plants is going to get "messy".
__________________
><(((ļ> Aaron ><(((ļ>
adadkins1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:04 AM   #5
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
alli.knight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by blert
Do you have access to a well?
Nope. Just city water.
__________________
alli.knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:12 AM   #6
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
alli.knight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by adadkins1
I'd recommend putting in some good plants like Hornwort and Dwarf Water Lettuce. They would help in reducing the nitrates.

By the way, I don't see how using plants is going to get "messy".
I like the look of the dwarf water lettuce. It's a floating plant, right? I've never had live plants before and for some reason they intimidate me. I'd love to give it a try though.
__________________
alli.knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:13 AM   #7
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,706
Quote:
Originally Posted by alli.knight

Nope. Just city water.
I think that is way out from EPA regs. Maybe call your water company and see what's up.
__________________
I support the right to arm bears.
blert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:17 AM   #8
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Terrance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,577
Fast-growing plants simply grow too fast. Hornwort in particular will start losing its leaf (not sure what the plant terminology would be here) as it grows longer. Many Other fast-growing plants are similar. These tend to make the display tank look rather messy since substrate will be covered with pieces of hornwort.

Natural floating plants like water lettuce are not messy IME. It's easy to own, but my HOB filter killed them and they kept clogging my filter intake.

The faster they grow, the more plants you will have. The more plants you have, the more you will need to maintain. These plants are better suited inside a refugium for their purposes.
__________________
Kind Regards,
Terrance
Terrance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:18 AM   #9
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
alli.knight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrance
I would setup an algae turf scrubber. It's very good to reduce all your nitrates to 0. You will have to go longer without water changes, so add supplemental minerals to the water for your fishes health.

An easier alternative would be putting fast growing plants in your tank to reduce nitrates. It will get messy though. You could also use pond matrix as part of your filtration.

Your area got some serious problems.. Find a way to fix it.
I just looked that up and it looks quite complicated. I think I'll just try plants first. Thanks!
__________________
alli.knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:19 AM   #10
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Terrance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,577
Oscar tank, correct?
__________________
Kind Regards,
Terrance
Terrance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:23 AM   #11
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
alli.knight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by blert

I think that is way out from EPA regs. Maybe call your water company and see what's up.
It's weird. I just looked up a water quality report for the city and according to it the MCL for nitrite+nitrate is 10000 ppm. The report was from 2010. Apparently the 2011 one isn't up yet. That's seems crazy high. I wonder if the units are wrong somehow...
__________________
alli.knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:24 AM   #12
jlk
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
jlk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: philadelphia suburbs
Posts: 11,118
The EPA only allows nitrates to be at a max of 10ppm for city/state regulated drinking water sources. You can contact your local water authority & explain your situation. They will come out & test your water for free. You can also check online for water testing reports for your area. The EPA's safe drinking water hotline is #800-426-4791. As a last resort, you can consider an under-sink RO unit but these are not cheap. Good luck resolving this issue!
__________________
jlk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:25 AM   #13
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
alli.knight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrance
Oscar tank, correct?
Yes. It just has one little guy in it. He's about 2 inches right now. I just got him last week.
__________________
alli.knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:27 AM   #14
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
alli.knight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlk
The EPA only allows nitrates to be at a max of 10ppm for city/state regulated drinking water sources. You can contact your local water authority & explain your situation. They will come out & test your water for free. You can also check online for water testing reports for your area. The EPA's safe drinking water hotline is #800-426-4791. As a last resort, you can consider an under-sink RO unit but these are not cheap. Good luck resolving this issue!
That seems like a good idea. I'll give the city a call. Thanks!
__________________
alli.knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 10:29 AM   #15
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
alli.knight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by alli.knight

It's weird. I just looked up a water quality report for the city and according to it the MCL for nitrite+nitrate is 10000 ppm. The report was from 2010. Apparently the 2011 one isn't up yet. That's seems crazy high. I wonder if the units are wrong somehow...
Maybe the units are supposed to be ppb?
__________________
alli.knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
nitrates, tap water

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fish-in Cycling: Step over into the dark side. jetajockey Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 55 10-15-2016 02:22 PM
Water changes please help Tinafina Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 34 11-07-2011 01:04 PM
water chemistry trouble! lornajane89 Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 18 08-22-2011 04:02 AM
A primer on un-filtered aquariums BlackMagic Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 1 08-07-2011 07:25 PM
Advice on newish (and first) tropical/fresh 10 gallon... FoxGlove Freshwater & Brackish - Getting Started 2 07-25-2011 12:22 PM







» Photo Contest Winners







All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.