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Old 08-25-2015, 01:20 PM   #1
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Tank in apartment

Hey guys I live in a fairly tall high rise here in Toronto and was wondering what you think would be a safe size to keep in a apartment. I'm looking in the 26 gallon range but a 36 gallon bowfront has also caught my eye and recently realized just how much weight a tank can be. I know there is concrete under my floor but just wanna make sure I'm not doing anything unsafe. Do you think 36 may be a bit big or should I probably be fine. I dont mind going smaller but the bigger one is just so pretty haha.

Anyone keep in apartments?

Thanks in advance,

Jeffrey


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Old 08-25-2015, 01:27 PM   #2
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Tank in apartment

I'd contact your renter and ask if they have any limits. They usually have recommendations to aquarium sizes and might even be able to tell you the best location to place one in your apartment in terms of where it won't fall through the floor haha.
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Old 08-25-2015, 01:51 PM   #3
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Definitely find out about structure and restrictions. When we lived in our third floor apartment I had a 75g, 2x 10g, 29g and 20g on one wall

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Old 08-25-2015, 01:55 PM   #4
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Woah amazing 😍 so many tanks


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Old 08-25-2015, 01:55 PM   #5
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you shouldn't have any issues with a 36g . the weight of that tank full is about the weight of a 250lb man nothing to be concerned about those buildings are built to pretty well ,
just a FYI if you go to the landlord to ask how much the floor will hold you will only open the door for him to ask for a deposit in-case of flood
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Old 08-25-2015, 04:21 PM   #6
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Should be fine I have a 40 breeder with a 20 gallon sump on the 3rd floor of my apartment and a 29.


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Old 08-25-2015, 04:27 PM   #7
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Woah amazing 😍 so many tanks
Thanks! Front right there was also a 30g. I also had 2x 10g in the actual living room and at least one 5g in the kitchen....
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Old 08-25-2015, 05:40 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by JeffreyBowers View Post
Hey guys I live in a fairly tall high rise here in Toronto and was wondering what you think would be a safe size to keep in a apartment. I'm looking in the 26 gallon range but a 36 gallon bowfront has also caught my eye and recently realized just how much weight a tank can be. I know there is concrete under my floor but just wanna make sure I'm not doing anything unsafe. Do you think 36 may be a bit big or should I probably be fine. I dont mind going smaller but the bigger one is just so pretty haha.

Anyone keep in apartments?

Thanks in advance,

Jeffrey


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Just repeating, check with your landlord. Some may not allow water pets at all so before spending a penny, I would check to make sure. ( It's more an insurance thing than a weight thing.)
Next issue ( may not apply to you): I used to service a tank on the 29th(+/-) floor of an office building in Miami, FL. The place was built on a floating base so the water level was always higher on one side of the tank and was changing constantly. Check to make sure you don;t have this situation and if so, don;t fill the tank all the way to the top.
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Old 08-26-2015, 02:23 AM   #9
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I think most people really just worry about the possibilities of leaking and damage obviously to your apartment but even the apartment underneath. Every place I've lived I've always asked my landlord if it was ok to have a tank and if I could have one on the second floor although I never did.

The last place I lived in my landlord looked like he wanted to faint when I told him I wanted to put a 30 gal upstairs but that place was kinda worn down. Like stated earlier a tank around this size and on a good stand will distribute the weight evenly and you really shouldn't have any issues and some people/furniture could weigh more then your tank.

I do think it's a good idea to talk to your renter but if you don't then check over your lease to make sure it doesn't include any restrictions. I'm sure it's the same everywhere if you break a condition of the lease you could be fined/evicted. And renters insurance that covers these problems isn't a bad idea either just in case.
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Old 08-26-2015, 05:57 AM   #10
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You said you live in a high rise but never stated if you are renting or you own.

If you own go ahead a 36g would not be an issue for weight.

Same for if you are renting, but I disagree with those saying to check with the landlord. Why start any conflict? There is no legitimate (or legal) reason for a landlord to not allow a tank that would weigh less than 2 adults sitting on a couch.

Important:
Make sure you have renters insurance just in case, as you would be held liable for any damages should something major go wrong.

Here in Ontario a landlord cannot evict you because of a pet; nor can they force you to get rid of a pet unless that pet is deemed dangerous, causes allergy issues, or causes problems for other tenants. Even if it states "no pets" in the lease it is not enforceable and deemed "void".

This info is readily available online on the Ontario Landlord and tenant board website.
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Old 08-26-2015, 12:56 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by mikey5290 View Post
You said you live in a high rise but never stated if you are renting or you own.

If you own go ahead a 36g would not be an issue for weight.

Same for if you are renting, but I disagree with those saying to check with the landlord. Why start any conflict? There is no legitimate (or legal) reason for a landlord to not allow a tank that would weigh less than 2 adults sitting on a couch.

Important:
Make sure you have renters insurance just in case, as you would be held liable for any damages should something major go wrong.

Here in Ontario a landlord cannot evict you because of a pet; nor can they force you to get rid of a pet unless that pet is deemed dangerous, causes allergy issues, or causes problems for other tenants. Even if it states "no pets" in the lease it is not enforceable and deemed "void".

This info is readily available online on the Ontario Landlord and tenant board website.
So how about putting yourself on the receiving side of a neighbor's leaking tank? How would you like it if you had 20 gals of water come through the walls or ceiling and right to where you have the electrical components to your brand new computer or big screen TV, etc and the water caused it to short out? Insurance is great but the inconvenience is worse don't you think?
There's also the idea of being "neighborly". Since in an apartment complex/ building you are just a part of the whole, so why not do the right thing to keep peace and harmony to the building? Asking for permission is not "starting a conflict." It's getting assurance that the building allows for such a thing. In most cases, I presume, it's not a big deal but to some it is. It's a liability. ( This is why I live in a house. )
Lastly, I am not an attorney ( nor do I play one on TV ) But I see a flaw in your argument. You stated " Here in Ontario a landlord cannot evict you because of a pet; nor can they force you to get rid of a pet unless that pet is deemed dangerous, causes allergy issues, or causes problems for other tenants. . The part I put in bold print sounds like the loophole for the landlord. Destruction of property, caused by a pet not approved in your lease, sounds like grounds for removal of you as a tenant as much as liable for the damages and loss of income. REALLY? It's not worth asking first?
Just something to think about.
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Old 08-26-2015, 06:10 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffreyBowers View Post
Hey guys I live in a fairly tall high rise here in Toronto and was wondering what you think would be a safe size to keep in a apartment. I'm looking in the 26 gallon range but a 36 gallon bowfront has also caught my eye and recently realized just how much weight a tank can be. I know there is concrete under my floor but just wanna make sure I'm not doing anything unsafe. Do you think 36 may be a bit big or should I probably be fine. I dont mind going smaller but the bigger one is just so pretty haha.

Anyone keep in apartments?

Thanks in advance,

Jeffrey


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I'm on the 10th floor, my building has many pets , Mikey is rite and I'm in Mississauga by the way.
I'm now building a 90 gal, my stand is done and I'm now in the process of cycling my water, by a good water test kit API master test kit$40 bucks its worth it , good luck and go for it man!!!

GO "JAYS"

Clem
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Old 08-26-2015, 06:14 PM   #13
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So how about putting yourself on the receiving side of a neighbor's leaking tank? How would you like it if you had 20 gals of water come through the walls or ceiling and right to where you have the electrical components to your brand new computer or big screen TV, etc and the water caused it to short out? Insurance is great but the inconvenience is worse don't you think?
There's also the idea of being "neighborly". Since in an apartment complex/ building you are just a part of the whole, so why not do the right thing to keep peace and harmony to the building? Asking for permission is not "starting a conflict." It's getting assurance that the building allows for such a thing. In most cases, I presume, it's not a big deal but to some it is. It's a liability. ( This is why I live in a house. )
Lastly, I am not an attorney ( nor do I play one on TV ) But I see a flaw in your argument. You stated " Here in Ontario a landlord cannot evict you because of a pet; nor can they force you to get rid of a pet unless that pet is deemed dangerous, causes allergy issues, or causes problems for other tenants. . The part I put in bold print sounds like the loophole for the landlord. Destruction of property, caused by a pet not approved in your lease, sounds like grounds for removal of you as a tenant as much as liable for the damages and loss of income. REALLY? It's not worth asking first?
Just something to think about.
You make a good point Mr, Andy. Neighbourly is rite too.
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Old 08-27-2015, 12:19 AM   #14
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So how about putting yourself on the receiving side of a neighbor's leaking tank? How would you like it if you had 20 gals of water come through the walls or ceiling and right to where you have the electrical components to your brand new computer or big screen TV, etc and the water caused it to short out? Insurance is great but the inconvenience is worse don't you think?
There's also the idea of being "neighborly". Since in an apartment complex/ building you are just a part of the whole, so why not do the right thing to keep peace and harmony to the building? Asking for permission is not "starting a conflict." It's getting assurance that the building allows for such a thing. In most cases, I presume, it's not a big deal but to some it is. It's a liability. ( This is why I live in a house. )
Lastly, I am not an attorney ( nor do I play one on TV ) But I see a flaw in your argument. You stated " Here in Ontario a landlord cannot evict you because of a pet; nor can they force you to get rid of a pet unless that pet is deemed dangerous, causes allergy issues, or causes problems for other tenants. . The part I put in bold print sounds like the loophole for the landlord. Destruction of property, caused by a pet not approved in your lease, sounds like grounds for removal of you as a tenant as much as liable for the damages and loss of income. REALLY? It's not worth asking first?
Just something to think about.
I hope we are not hijacking the OP's thread or getting to far off topic but;

I do agree with you Andy on many points, being on the receiving end would of course be terrible, and I am not condoning doing anything malicious or that would be likely to cause issues for anyones else (no homemade 400gallon tanks on the 2nd floor of a 100 year old duplex). Of course accidents do happen and that is why I strongly urge any renter to have insurance.

Let me clarify what I meant by conflict. Unfortunately some landlords are unaware of the rules and regulations that govern them through the LTB (Landlord&tenant board), and as such they believe they are able to create rules or clauses in a lease that contradict what is in the LTB act.
I am not a lawyer either ( hope I didnt come across like one) but unfortuantely due to a couple very bad landlords in the past I had to become more familiar with the LTB act than I ever wanted to be.

Should you be able to talk to your landlord if you are looking for suggestions as to where to put a tank?..Absolutely, and if you have a good relationship with them by all means do so. But if he/she says NO tanks! Are you willing to have no tanks even though you know he/she has no authority to make that decision for you. Or are you willing to install that tank after they say no and then have them upset that you went against them.


Me personally (and this is just my opinion) I would install the tank, it is a reasonable size. And in the remote chance the landlord says something about it, politely explain that you looked into the LTB and you are within your rights to own pets in your dwelling. Maybe invite them in to show them your tank, explain the weight of the entire set up; maybe even offer to move it if they have a better suggestion for structural reasons.

As for the possible loophole, any pet provision in a lease (here anyways) is void.
So, as long as you have insurance to cover damages that may be caused your butt is covered. Not saying you won't have disgruntled neighbors.

Those are my thoughts and probably my longest post.
If in doubt don't be afraid to double check the LTB website or give them a call.
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Old 08-27-2015, 02:06 PM   #15
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Thanks for the clarification and No, I hope we aren't highjacking the thread. Just trying to help the OP make an informed decision.
It just sounded like your original post was suggesting the OP hide the facts and being that I am in the real estate business here in the states ( and admit to not fully knowing Canadian rules and laws) and having had many conversations with other landlords, hidden info is usually grounds for eviction ( when caught) and rarely does the tenant come out on top in a court case. That phrase "or causes problems for other tenants" just screams to me "LOOPHOLE" as a leaking tank, or water coming through the walls or ceilings from a non building related utility ( ie bath or shower or sink) and destroying property, could be trouble to defend.
At this point, I think it's now up to the OP to decide how he wants to proceed.
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Old 08-27-2015, 10:13 PM   #16
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You know there is concrete in an apartment building yet still ask this question? Do you know how much weight a concrete with reebar and steel beam supported structure can hold LOL.. I have 3 fish tank in a 10x10 bedroom 3rd level of my house with only wood for support.. One is a 27g the other is my 92g and then my 10g.. Not to mentioned my desk computer, dresser full of cloths, my full sized bed, and my 300lbs self


Alot more then a house with wood supports.. Im sure youd be fine with 200G tanks in every corner.


What you need to worry about is leaking tanks.. Thats why i would buy a new fish tank and make sure its level.. vs having a 10-20 year old fish tank.. What if it leaks and goes right through to your neighbors.. Granted though on a newer apartment building with a concrete subfloor that wouldnt happen through the ceiling but it could come through the walls instead. Trust me i know what only 10g of water does.. I have a 44g pentagon that leaked about 10g of water before i caught it and it went through the wood floor and to the next level ceiling.. I had to repaint and red spatula half the ceiling lol. And dry out the carpet with towels and fans for 2 weeks


I would find out if the building is made with a concrete subfloor or not, thats the only conern you should have honestly
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Old 09-02-2015, 11:18 PM   #17
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I asked my maintenance supervisor before I purchased my 60G because I'm on the 3rd floor. He said there were plenty of people with 125G tanks so I would be ok.
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