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Old 03-26-2018, 07:52 PM   #1
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Sick Yellow Tang

Hello All, I know it's been a while since I posted. Most recently I posted about an electrical problem with a Rio pump, which electrocuted my tank water, the fish were okay once I got them out. They spent a month or so in a hospital tank while I cleaned up the main display tank. I moved them back in recently, after taking the opportunity to add a couple new fish (rearranged the rock so the old fish wouldn't be territorial).

Everyone has been doing okay for about another month, then I noticed my tank was swimming funny on the bottom of the tank, but eating and acting normal when food was in the water. I did notice loss of color so I started treating with Melafix. Today, I noticed red markings on my tang. Pictures are below. I don't know what this is and I will be looking for information on the forum, but I wanted to start a thread and see if anyone knows what this is. The yellow tank is not acting normal at all now. the other three fish are fine.
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Old 03-26-2018, 07:54 PM   #2
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Old 03-26-2018, 09:17 PM   #3
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Looks like hemorrhagic septicemia ?
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Old 03-26-2018, 11:29 PM   #4
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I wasn't sure, but I was thinking that might be it. Only because I looked up the symptoms online. So, I just found out that we can no longer buy the antibiotics we used to be able to buy (Maracyn, Maracyn 2). The Mardel fish disease chart says Maracyn 2 would treat this. But since I can't get it anymore, I bought what I could find at the pet store for bacterial infection. I'm working on setting up a sick tank now. It's too bad because I just took it down. If anyone has a better recommendation for a medication to treat this please post.
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Old 03-27-2018, 08:33 AM   #5
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Are antibiotics illegal in CA ?
Maracyn and maracyn2 are still available on line .
The maracin 2 is minocycline which is a tetracycline based med .
Other links say Erythromycin may be effective.
Many LFS carry tetracycline / erythromycin I believe.
In other reading their is thought that this infection could be viral ?
Non curable ?
What med did you get ?
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Old 03-27-2018, 08:48 PM   #6
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I have yet to find a comprehensive list of Human to Fish application, but this link gives you a general idea, from Fish to Human; https://www.thebugoutbagguide.com/fi...cs-for-humans/

I've had pretty good luck doing this, especially using expired human antibiotics. Very cost effective!!! I will never apply into a cycled tank, most if not all of these Meds with kill beneficial bacterias!

Make sure to use a digital mail scale to convert dosages equal to the capacity of your hospital tank!

Best of Luck
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Old 03-31-2018, 11:29 AM   #7
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Are antibiotics illegal in CA ?
Maracyn and maracyn2 are still available on line .
The maracin 2 is minocycline which is a tetracycline based med .
Other links say Erythromycin may be effective.
Many LFS carry tetracycline / erythromycin I believe.
In other reading their is thought that this infection could be viral ?
Non curable ?
What med did you get ?
I cannot find them online. I searched and search. I did end up buying Furan 2, I believe that's the name. It's active ingredient is nitrofurazone. That's is an antibiotic so I'm trying that.
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Old 03-31-2018, 11:32 AM   #8
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It turns out my yellow tang passed on. He was too bad off. But my clown fish is not showing the same early symptoms, lying on the bottom, but still very interested in eating. He comes up whenever I get close to the tank.

I'm treating with the Furan-2 and will see what happens. Maybe I caught this early enough.
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Old 03-31-2018, 03:16 PM   #9
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Sorry about your tang ,he looked pretty rough.
By description many marine issues list the same symptoms [whitish patches , sloughing skin and such ] . It is hard to make an accurate assessment , but with the clown now showing a symptom I would give Brooklynella a good look . It is a parasite and the antibiotic will not touch it.
Just putting that out there for no good reason except the clown now showing symptom.
I always get to Brooklynella when I am considering an issue with clowns.
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Old 03-31-2018, 05:29 PM   #10
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(Info provided by blue zoo)

Most Common Tang Ailments and Treatment Protocols
Tang Husbandry
You will hear some people refer to many tangs as “ich-magnets.” Now we don’t like this one bit because first, marine fishes don’t get “ich”, and second, in our experience, if a tang is fed a nutritious and varied diet and is kept in an aquarium with stable, high quality water with a salinity close to natural seawater, the fish is not overly susceptible to protozoan parasites like Cryptocaryon and Amyloodinium. In this article, we are going to emphasize the importance of good husbandry when keeping tangs—an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. We will also, however, look at some of the common ailments are the most effective treatment protocols for those ailments.
Good Husbandry is the First Line of Defense

Tangs are not, in our experience, overly susceptible to parasites and other ailments when they are kept properly. By properly, we mean a stress free environment where a varied and nutritious diet is readily available. The average tang tank should be large (really nothing under 75 gallons and much, much larger for some species) and have plenty of live rock AND plenty of swimming space. Water movement should be brisk, as this assists with oxygen exchange at the surface. Tankmates should be appropriately chosen so as not to cause undue territorial aggression.

Nutrition is critical for tang health. Be sure to offer quality foods prepared for herbivores, and offer dried marine algae regularly in the form of sheet food like nori or an aquarium-specific product like Sea Veggies. Macroalgae grown in a refugium is fantastic foodstuff for many tangs. As mentioned above, the tank should have plenty of live rock, and it should not be “too tidy” in terms of filamentous algae. In the wild, tangs spend the day picking at the reef in search of their favorite food, and they will want to do the same in your aquarium.

Most tangs will readily accept just about any prepared food you offer to your other fishes. Use this fact to your advantage, and feed flake food that has been soaked in a vitamin supplement like Selcon to your tang. This will assist with the fish’s immune system and will insure optimum nutrition.
Crypto and Other Infestations

If you do notice that your tang, despite your best efforts, is showing signs of infestation or any other ailment, you are advised to respond quickly. One of the more common ailments of which you hear people speaking in relation to tangs is cryptocaryonosis, sometimes simply called "crypto." This is a disease caused by the parasite Cryptocaryon irritans which bores into the fish’s skin and gills. The parasite is then covered with mucus produced by the fish as part of the fish's natural defense mechanism. It is this mucus buildup that the aquarist is referring to when he or she says, "My fish has white-spot disease." You may also see the spots on the eyes of the fish or on the fins or tail. In addition, the parasites bore into the gill structure, causing respiratory difficulty for the fish.

If you observe these white spots, quickly remove the fish to a quarantine tank for treatment. If you observe the white spots on all of your fish, you will need to remove them all from your aquarium for a period of about one month. Leaving the tank fallow for this length of time, should break the life cycle of the parasite and prevent future outbreaks once your fishes are returned to the tank.

· Treatment of the affected fish usually involves some or all of the following procedures:
· Freshwater dips dosed with methylene blue plus formalin
· Lowering specific gravity (hyposalinity = 1.010-1.013) of the quarantine tank
· Continuous exposure for at least 28 days to 0.15 to 0.20 ppm copper, although copper in and of itself can have long-term negative effects
· Antibiotic feeding (preventative against secondary infection)

There are several other protozoan infestations of which the marine aquarist should be aware. They are Amyloodinium ocellatum (sometimes called marine velvet disease) and two additional ciliate protozoans, Brooklynella hostiles (sometimes called anemonefish disease) and Uronema marinum (often called uronema). All three of these can affect tangs, and all can be devastating to your system if not treated quickly. All three infestations present in roughly the same way (skin damage, rapid breathing, rubbing on rocks and substrate, and extreme lethargy) and are the results of very similar parasitic organisms with almost identical life cycles. All are commonly treated with the same procedures.

Hole-in-the-Head Disease
Hole-in-the-head disease is commonly associated with tangs (and angelfishes), but relatively little is known about what it is, what causes it and how to effectively treat it. The information presented here is mostly anecdotal, but here it is.

Hole-in-the-head disease is believed to be caused by a flagellated parasite that occurs commonly in the gastrointestinal tracts of health marine fishes. When populations of this parasite grow too large, infested fishes will lose their coloration and their appetite. They will act abnormal (e.g., a tang sulking in a dark corner of the tank) and their fecal matter may become white and slimy in appearance. Pitting of the flesh on the fish’s head is also sometimes observed (hence the name), but the overgrowth of these parasites usually occurs in the intestinal tract.

If you suspect hole-in-the-head disease, it is recommended to remove the fish to a quarantine tank where it can be nursed back to health. In the quarantine tank, metronidazole can be added to the water at a concentration recommended by the drug manufacturer. Seachem makes a widely available product containing metronidazole called AquaZole. There are other options including the human drug Flagyl.
Some aquarist also recommend soaking foods in metronidazole if the fish is still feeding and then feeding the medicated foods. Unfortunately this is often difficult as a fish suffering from hole-in-the-head disease will not be eating.

Head and Lateral Line Erosion (HLLE)
The condition referred to as head and lateral line erosion (HLLE) is different from the above ailments as it is a non-pathogenic ailment. A tang afflicted with HLLE will present with pitting and scarring along its lateral line and on the head. Fading color is also quite common. Like hole-in-the-head disease, HLLE is not very well understood, but it is our experience that it is often related to malnutrition or prolonged exposure to hyposaline conditions. Stray electric current (e.g., from faulty powerheads) is also sometimes believed to be the culprit.

There are many other suspected causes of HLLE, and because the causes are not well understood, effective treatment can be difficult to nail down. Here is what we suggest:
· Insure water quality is high and stable

· Use a supplement for synthetic saltwater such as Kent Marine’s Essential Elements
· Insure a varied and nutritious diet (using a vitamin supplement like Selcon) is being offered
· Reduce the amount of chemical filtration (if any) on the system, especially activated carbon
· Remove any potentially faulty powerheads, heaters or other equipment that could be releasing stray voltage into the aquarium

Frequently HLLE will not lead to death, but rather it will result in disfiguration and, ultimately, discomfort to the animal necessitating euthanasia. If you observe the signs and symptoms, act quickly.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This article actually helped me save my tang about a year ago he looked just like yours just not as far along , I caught it early luckily my tang didn't get that far before I caught it , I am sorry I cant remember what I treated with as I got it from Gary the one who wrote the article , he actually is the one who saved my tang , unfortunately your poor guy looks as he had a ruff ride and I don't think treating would help .
it would probably burn causing him to suffer more . all I can remember the med was very potent it sizzled as I added to the QT ,
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Old 04-01-2018, 01:59 PM   #11
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I did move the tang to a sick tank, he passed on, unfortunately. I moved the clown to a sick tank and began treatment with Furan-2, which is what I had ordered for the tang. The clown had the exact same symptoms (lying around the bottom, but still eating, starting to look thin) and after two days of treatment, the clown is swimming around the surface all the time now, and not lying on the bottom. Today he gets a 25% water change, per Furan-2 instructions, then another 2-day course to finish out the full course of treatment. Let's hope he will recover fully, it seems he is much much better.

I will post again to update so others can use this med if they can't find the Maracyn. That was always my go-to med, either Maracyn or Maracyn 2 depending on symptoms.
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Old 04-01-2018, 02:00 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 54seaweed View Post
(Info provided by blue zoo)

Most Common Tang Ailments and Treatment Protocols
Tang Husbandry
You will hear some people refer to many tangs as “ich-magnets.” Now we don’t like this one bit because first, marine fishes don’t get “ich”, and second, in our experience, if a tang is fed a nutritious and varied diet and is kept in an aquarium with stable, high quality water with a salinity close to natural seawater, the fish is not overly susceptible to protozoan parasites like Cryptocaryon and Amyloodinium. In this article, we are going to emphasize the importance of good husbandry when keeping tangs—an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. We will also, however, look at some of the common ailments are the most effective treatment protocols for those ailments.
Good Husbandry is the First Line of Defense

Tangs are not, in our experience, overly susceptible to parasites and other ailments when they are kept properly. By properly, we mean a stress free environment where a varied and nutritious diet is readily available. The average tang tank should be large (really nothing under 75 gallons and much, much larger for some species) and have plenty of live rock AND plenty of swimming space. Water movement should be brisk, as this assists with oxygen exchange at the surface. Tankmates should be appropriately chosen so as not to cause undue territorial aggression.

Nutrition is critical for tang health. Be sure to offer quality foods prepared for herbivores, and offer dried marine algae regularly in the form of sheet food like nori or an aquarium-specific product like Sea Veggies. Macroalgae grown in a refugium is fantastic foodstuff for many tangs. As mentioned above, the tank should have plenty of live rock, and it should not be “too tidy” in terms of filamentous algae. In the wild, tangs spend the day picking at the reef in search of their favorite food, and they will want to do the same in your aquarium.

Most tangs will readily accept just about any prepared food you offer to your other fishes. Use this fact to your advantage, and feed flake food that has been soaked in a vitamin supplement like Selcon to your tang. This will assist with the fish’s immune system and will insure optimum nutrition.
Crypto and Other Infestations

If you do notice that your tang, despite your best efforts, is showing signs of infestation or any other ailment, you are advised to respond quickly. One of the more common ailments of which you hear people speaking in relation to tangs is cryptocaryonosis, sometimes simply called "crypto." This is a disease caused by the parasite Cryptocaryon irritans which bores into the fish’s skin and gills. The parasite is then covered with mucus produced by the fish as part of the fish's natural defense mechanism. It is this mucus buildup that the aquarist is referring to when he or she says, "My fish has white-spot disease." You may also see the spots on the eyes of the fish or on the fins or tail. In addition, the parasites bore into the gill structure, causing respiratory difficulty for the fish.

If you observe these white spots, quickly remove the fish to a quarantine tank for treatment. If you observe the white spots on all of your fish, you will need to remove them all from your aquarium for a period of about one month. Leaving the tank fallow for this length of time, should break the life cycle of the parasite and prevent future outbreaks once your fishes are returned to the tank.

· Treatment of the affected fish usually involves some or all of the following procedures:
· Freshwater dips dosed with methylene blue plus formalin
· Lowering specific gravity (hyposalinity = 1.010-1.013) of the quarantine tank
· Continuous exposure for at least 28 days to 0.15 to 0.20 ppm copper, although copper in and of itself can have long-term negative effects
· Antibiotic feeding (preventative against secondary infection)

There are several other protozoan infestations of which the marine aquarist should be aware. They are Amyloodinium ocellatum (sometimes called marine velvet disease) and two additional ciliate protozoans, Brooklynella hostiles (sometimes called anemonefish disease) and Uronema marinum (often called uronema). All three of these can affect tangs, and all can be devastating to your system if not treated quickly. All three infestations present in roughly the same way (skin damage, rapid breathing, rubbing on rocks and substrate, and extreme lethargy) and are the results of very similar parasitic organisms with almost identical life cycles. All are commonly treated with the same procedures.

Hole-in-the-Head Disease
Hole-in-the-head disease is commonly associated with tangs (and angelfishes), but relatively little is known about what it is, what causes it and how to effectively treat it. The information presented here is mostly anecdotal, but here it is.

Hole-in-the-head disease is believed to be caused by a flagellated parasite that occurs commonly in the gastrointestinal tracts of health marine fishes. When populations of this parasite grow too large, infested fishes will lose their coloration and their appetite. They will act abnormal (e.g., a tang sulking in a dark corner of the tank) and their fecal matter may become white and slimy in appearance. Pitting of the flesh on the fish’s head is also sometimes observed (hence the name), but the overgrowth of these parasites usually occurs in the intestinal tract.

If you suspect hole-in-the-head disease, it is recommended to remove the fish to a quarantine tank where it can be nursed back to health. In the quarantine tank, metronidazole can be added to the water at a concentration recommended by the drug manufacturer. Seachem makes a widely available product containing metronidazole called AquaZole. There are other options including the human drug Flagyl.
Some aquarist also recommend soaking foods in metronidazole if the fish is still feeding and then feeding the medicated foods. Unfortunately this is often difficult as a fish suffering from hole-in-the-head disease will not be eating.

Head and Lateral Line Erosion (HLLE)
The condition referred to as head and lateral line erosion (HLLE) is different from the above ailments as it is a non-pathogenic ailment. A tang afflicted with HLLE will present with pitting and scarring along its lateral line and on the head. Fading color is also quite common. Like hole-in-the-head disease, HLLE is not very well understood, but it is our experience that it is often related to malnutrition or prolonged exposure to hyposaline conditions. Stray electric current (e.g., from faulty powerheads) is also sometimes believed to be the culprit.

There are many other suspected causes of HLLE, and because the causes are not well understood, effective treatment can be difficult to nail down. Here is what we suggest:
· Insure water quality is high and stable

· Use a supplement for synthetic saltwater such as Kent Marine’s Essential Elements
· Insure a varied and nutritious diet (using a vitamin supplement like Selcon) is being offered
· Reduce the amount of chemical filtration (if any) on the system, especially activated carbon
· Remove any potentially faulty powerheads, heaters or other equipment that could be releasing stray voltage into the aquarium

Frequently HLLE will not lead to death, but rather it will result in disfiguration and, ultimately, discomfort to the animal necessitating euthanasia. If you observe the signs and symptoms, act quickly.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This article actually helped me save my tang about a year ago he looked just like yours just not as far along , I caught it early luckily my tang didn't get that far before I caught it , I am sorry I cant remember what I treated with as I got it from Gary the one who wrote the article , he actually is the one who saved my tang , unfortunately your poor guy looks as he had a ruff ride and I don't think treating would help .
it would probably burn causing him to suffer more . all I can remember the med was very potent it sizzled as I added to the QT ,


I don't know why I couldn't find this post about sick fish, probably because I was too stressed and didn't look in the right place, it's been a while since I've been here. Thanks. I do believe my tang was too far gone for any help.
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Old 04-01-2018, 03:24 PM   #13
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Glad the furan is working .
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Old 04-01-2018, 04:19 PM   #14
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clowns are strong and it sounds like you caught it fast on him and treating .
he may have some scaring if he had any lesions . but I think he'll have a full recovery
keep up on treatment if you see after treatment he still has any sign do a large water change wait about a week and retreat I would prob do 1/2 dose
maybe bandit will kick in his input on this
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Old 04-03-2018, 05:56 PM   #15
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Sorry for your loss. The red spots are hemorrhaging . Probably from the electrocution. Tangs in my experience are sensitive creatures. Good luck with the others.
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