Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > Freshwater > Freshwater & Brackish - Unhealthy Fish
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 03-01-2023, 05:58 AM   #21
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Perth in Western Australia
Posts: 1,238
Be careful about the experts online too. There's plenty of people out there claiming to be but the real ones are few and far between and generally don't brag about it.

__________________
Colin_T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2023, 09:51 AM   #22
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Caliban07's Avatar


 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 6,218
Just a couple of clarifications I would like to make.

Aquarium plant are not all created equal but most of them are in fact semi aquatic. As the seasonal droughts and floods occur they need to adapt their leaf structure to facilitate co2 uptake. For example, emersed plants will develop stomata which will take in co2 but when they are underwater they will change their leaf structure and lose the stomata. The leaves are very thin so that gases can move between the leaf surface and in to the plant. True terrestrial plants die under water and there are a few plants sold in aquarium store that are strictly non aquatic.

Natural water ways vary in terms of co2 availability due to geographical elements. Some waterways are low in co2 but high in carbonates. As we know plants can take in carbonates and change itís structure internally to co2. So just because waters are naturally low in co2 does not mean that there is a shortage.

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0371.jpg
Views:	9
Size:	198.0 KB
ID:	325030

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0372.jpg
Views:	9
Size:	166.6 KB
ID:	325031

As you can see from the data supplied by Tropica (one of the leading suppliers of plants in the industry for decades) co2 in natural waterways can be quite high, far exceeding that of equilibrium. If you consider that most high tech keepers aim for 30ppm co2 then it is quite clear some plants do come from
Waterways with a very similar co2 content. It isnít fair to say these plants are terrestrial only. Some of these plants die without high levels of co2 because they are not accustomed to water that is low in co2.

So in short, some plants need co2 supplementation to survive in aquariums but it doesnít mean that they are not aquatic.

The question is whether high tech plants and fish/shrimp and snails etc share the same spatial characteristics. What might be required for some plants might not be good for certain fish species and vice versa. This is why it is important to keep species that are closely linked in nature.

Planting as many different plants as you can and letting the dominant species take over. This means they are tailored to your water and there is no need to add things to the water to help.

Lastly, many aquarium plants do very well on relatively low light. In fact most aquascaping competition aquariums only run at <40 Par which would be considered low light.
__________________
Caliban07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2023, 04:53 PM   #23
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2023
Posts: 13
Today's update. Brown algae basically gone, and water is clear again. Only algae is the normal green stuff in small patches. Water numbers look stabile as well. I'm going to clean the decorations and rocks I took out really well before putting them back so we don't have another wave. Then I feel comfortable slowly adding plants and fish back in
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20230307_134755.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	117.3 KB
ID:	325068   Click image for larger version

Name:	20230307_134726.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	192.7 KB
ID:	325069  

Click image for larger version

Name:	20230307_134714.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	252.2 KB
ID:	325070   Click image for larger version

Name:	20230307_134737.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	230.8 KB
ID:	325071  

__________________
Jbeals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2023, 10:03 AM   #24
Aquarium Advice Addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Perth in Western Australia
Posts: 1,238
good to hear things are settling down
__________________
Colin_T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2023, 12:09 PM   #25
Aquarium Advice Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2023
Posts: 13
Thank you everyone for you help. I'll keep updating as we progress in the rebuild
__________________
Jbeals is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
algae, alkalinity, brown, brown algae, trouble

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water has yellow brown tint/brown algae present tsdobbi Freshwater & Brackish - General Discussion 6 09-19-2021 10:06 PM
Strange Brown Stains on One of My "Shipwreck" Ornaments...Is This "Brown Algae"? Osage_Winter General Hardware/Equipment Discussion 10 11-19-2010 05:08 PM
Brown Algae/diatoms/silicates trouble?? RYANLAWRENCE Saltwater Reef Aquaria 18 06-21-2010 09:04 PM
flourescent lime green algae AND brown algae courtneyclv Saltwater & Reef - Identification 3 07-27-2006 08:05 AM
lowering alkalinity alkalinity Loki4711 Saltwater Reef Aquaria 3 05-26-2005 11:39 PM







» Photo Contest Winners







All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.