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Old 06-28-2017, 07:41 PM   #1
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Planted lighting Help! What would you do?

I just received a 46g bowfront with filter and all the trimmings. I just resealed it and I'm going to convert my 20g planted to this 46g. First, what should I do for lighting. I want to do it right. Want to go heavily planted. Also, any suggestions on caring for the abundance. Right now I run substrate ferts and liquid ferts and occasional liquid co2. Anything I should do different in this size planted tank? Thanks for the help. Love this hobby and the planted aquariums is my new found love.




P.s. I am going to add much more shrimp. Lol
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Old 06-28-2017, 07:58 PM   #2
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What light level? Low, medium or high? If high, I would get at least two lights.
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Old 06-28-2017, 08:21 PM   #3
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Planted lighting Help! What would you do?

Finnex planted plus Se will put you in the low-mid range for lighting.
Chihiros RBG or A series will do the same.
Both fixtures have dimmers so I'd suggest starting low and work your way up slowly to reduce the chance of algae growth.

2 of them will put you medium to high. If going high lighting you'll need a preasurised co2 system or you'll just grow an algae farm.
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Old 06-28-2017, 08:30 PM   #4
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Why algae without co2? Why would this cause it?
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Old 06-28-2017, 08:45 PM   #5
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Why algae without co2? Why would this cause it?


High lighting aquariums require co2 to keep algae away due to the massive uptake of nutrients. In a high lighting environment plants need maximum nutrient uptake to out compete algae growth. Co2 increases the amount of nutrients the plants can absorb there for starving out algae. If no nutrients are available for algae to feed on it won't grow. If there is no dying/decaying leaves for algae to attach to then it can't get a foot hold.

So basically co2 makes the plants as healthy as they can be, stopping algae growth.

Depending on the type of plants you are keeping u won't require high light or co2. But I can 100% guarantee that if u have high lighting and no co2 or dosing liquid carbon, you will have major algae issues. High light plants are very co2 demanding. If it's not available they will become weak and algae will take over.
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Old 06-28-2017, 08:51 PM   #6
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Ok. What would be a good recommendation for low to mid light plants and maybe something to carpet the ground mildly
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Old 06-29-2017, 04:07 AM   #7
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Ok. What would be a good recommendation for low to mid light plants and maybe something to carpet the ground mildly


Depends what look you are trying to achieve. Nature, jungle, Dutch etc
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Old 06-29-2017, 10:05 AM   #8
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Ok. What would be a good recommendation for low to mid light plants and maybe something to carpet the ground mildly
carpet plants tend to be more difficult in low to medium light. Pygmy chain swords will give you some coverage but not a thick carpet.

Monte Carlo I hear does well in medium light but I have no experience with it

Micranthemum 'Monte Carlo' - Tropica Aquarium Plants


for colors and mid level I recommend Alternanthera reineckii 'Mini'. It can be kept even shorter as well by trimming the tops often

Alternanthera reineckii 'Mini' - Tropica Aquarium Plants

I also recommend mosses. Fissidens fontanus and Christmas moss. You would attack these to rocks or driftwood. I use crazy glue to attack moss to prepared aquarium driftwood.

See this guys tips for moss and crazy glue.
http://www.aquariumadvice.com/forums...ol-350194.html

It dries n 15 minutes and can be placed in the tank immediately. I made bonsai trees with fissidens fonatanus and bought driftwood from

I have also stuffed cholla logs with moss

https://bonsaidriftwood.com/

he also sells lots of cool rocks and plain driftood pieces. Make sure you boil/soak any driftwood prior to placing it your tank... Have to remove the tannins which is basically a brownish color acid that leaches from driftwood. Soaking and boiling removes this

have fun googling aquatic plant ideas and checking out aquascapes. Lots of ideas to be borrowed

I personally suggest a cascading look. You can use driftwood and rocks to help divide areas and hold substrate in position. try to create some caves nooks and crannies for your fish
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Old 06-29-2017, 10:56 AM   #9
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Why algae without co2? Why would this cause it?

basic photosynthesis here at play. There are 3 things we need to assure in a planted tank. Light, Nutrients and CO2

Too much light causes plants to want to grow real fast. This means plants will use up all nutrients and CO2 quicker. Once exhausted plants can not grow and will show deficiencies and this excess light feeds algae growth on your now weak dying plants.

Too little light, and/or not enough CO2 means the plants won't grow well and will start to melt and rot and algae will start to win

Basically the thought today is to ensure your light can be moved up and down and/or dimmed. Moving it further away reduces intensity and of course closer increases. Dimming also works. Having this dynamic in your lighting is most important.


Finding the right balance of light that promotes plant growth and doesn't cause algae is something you have to discover. The amount of nutrients needed corresponds to the amount of light and CO2 present. If light and Co2 are present then the plants will use any nutrients they have available to grow. Here we figure out enough nutrients to ensure growth and no deficiencies. Excess nutrients (to a reasonable expectation) are OK if the proper amount of Light and enough CO2 are present.

If you are not going to use CO2 injection and you are going with medium light you shouldl research Liquid CO2. Its not as good as Co2 gas injection but it is useful to add. I have Co2 injection and I use liquid CO2.


However you MUST UNDERSTAND WITH ALL THESE ADDED NUTRIENTS CO2 ETC.. THAT YOU MUST CHANGE YOUR WATER 50% ONCE EVERY WEEK OR 2 AT MOST. You also must trim regularly. Over growth shads bottom leafs and smaller plants. Older leafs will melt away and will need to be removed occasionally

Also WATER FLOW. You must ensure that water is flowing to all the corners of your tank. you want to ensure nutrients/CO2 are circulating everywhere your plants are. Dead spots happen because of flow issues
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Old 06-29-2017, 12:36 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Funken_A View Post
basic photosynthesis here at play. There are 3 things we need to assure in a planted tank. Light, Nutrients and CO2

Too much light causes plants to want to grow real fast. This means plants will use up all nutrients and CO2 quicker. Once exhausted plants can not grow and will show deficiencies and this excess light feeds algae growth on your now weak dying plants.

Too little light, and/or not enough CO2 means the plants won't grow well and will start to melt and rot and algae will start to win

Basically the thought today is to ensure your light can be moved up and down and/or dimmed. Moving it further away reduces intensity and of course closer increases. Dimming also works. Having this dynamic in your lighting is most important.


Finding the right balance of light that promotes plant growth and doesn't cause algae is something you have to discover. The amount of nutrients needed corresponds to the amount of light and CO2 present. If light and Co2 are present then the plants will use any nutrients they have available to grow. Here we figure out enough nutrients to ensure growth and no deficiencies. Excess nutrients (to a reasonable expectation) are OK if the proper amount of Light and enough CO2 are present.

If you are not going to use CO2 injection and you are going with medium light you shouldl research Liquid CO2. Its not as good as Co2 gas injection but it is useful to add. I have Co2 injection and I use liquid CO2.


However you MUST UNDERSTAND WITH ALL THESE ADDED NUTRIENTS CO2 ETC.. THAT YOU MUST CHANGE YOUR WATER 50% ONCE EVERY WEEK OR 2 AT MOST. You also must trim regularly. Over growth shads bottom leafs and smaller plants. Older leafs will melt away and will need to be removed occasionally

Also WATER FLOW. You must ensure that water is flowing to all the corners of your tank. you want to ensure nutrients/CO2 are circulating everywhere your plants are. Dead spots happen because of flow issues

To add to this, algae are less complex than plants. When photosynthesis occurs, the photons are used in the light-dependent reactions to "excite" electrons to a higher energy state in the photosystems to produce ATP and oxygen. In the Calvin Cycle, ATP and CO2 are used to make sugars, which build up the plant and give it its biomass. When CO2 and light, as well as nutrients for nutrition, are not in a balance, it gives way to bad plant growth.

If you use the Estimative Index method to dose fertilizers, then 50% water changes are necessary. If you are leaner with nutrients (PPS-Pro or the Flourish regimen, for example), then I'd aim for weekly water changes of 20-30%, or biweekly water changes of 50%.

The 10x water flow rule is a good one to follow. Most of the time, one can't achieve that with filtration. It is better for water to remain in contact with the biological media (if using a canister) in the filter for a longer period of time anyway--for the sake of tank health. Filters are for filtering, and circulation pumps are for circulation. I get a little over 5x water flow with my canister, and I supplement the rest with a small circulation pump.
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