Go Back   Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community > General Aquarium Forums > General Hardware/Equipment Discussion
Click Here to Login

Join Aquarium Advice Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com
 
Old 03-14-2008, 02:09 AM   #1
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
land locked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 203
High Tech

I am very interested to see if the Pinpoint salinity monitors are worth the ease of use and frequency vs cost of the unit. I also have seen many digital Ph monitors. Are these electronic devices accurate? I feel like since I am so new at this I would have less human error in reading the test kits. I have spent this much already on this hobby I do not want to fail because I can't figure out the testing process. I have a hot tub and rarely test it because I can just tell by smell, feel on my skin and look of the water. When I do test I am right on. I know I won't have that luxury with an aquarium. Thoughts?
__________________

__________________
land locked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 10:58 AM   #2
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
land locked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 203
Has anyone used these techie things?
__________________

__________________
land locked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 12:54 PM   #3
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Seattle-ish, WA
Posts: 5,340
Just FYI, in the future you'll probably get more people looking at your post (and responding!) if you post in the appropriate "Saltwater" section of the forum. This section - although "Help" does imply exactly what you're asking for - seems to be used for "Forum Help" and deals with the program aspects of the forum software itself.

Maybe a moderator can move this?

In answering your question, I'd recommend newcomers get familiar with the manual methods of testing first (test kits, refractometer, etc) and then move on to electronic means if they desire. Not only are they cheaper, there is less maintenance involved. From what I've seen, if you have no experience with the fallback manual methods, you tend to put too must trust in the fancy electronic equipment and don't tend to question/doublecheck them when they give you "strange" results.
__________________
Kurt_Nelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 01:06 PM   #4
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
land locked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 203
I will do, thanks for letting me know.TOO NEWWW
__________________
land locked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 01:08 PM   #5
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
land locked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 203
High tech

I guess I have been posting in the wrong place. Hope this is correct now.

I am very interested to see if the Pinpoint salinity monitors are worth the ease of use and frequency vs cost of the unit. I also have seen many digital Ph monitors. Are these electronic devices accurate? I feel like since I am so new at this I would have less human error in reading the test kits. I have spent this much already on this hobby I do not want to fail because I can't figure out the testing process. I have a hot tub and rarely test it because I can just tell by smell, feel on my skin and look of the water. When I do test I am right on. I know I won't have that luxury with an aquarium. Thoughts?
__________________
land locked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 02:47 PM   #6
AA Team Emeritus
 
cmor1701d's Avatar


 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Belle Mead, NJ
Posts: 7,812
I have the Pinpoint pH monitor and love it. It does require some regular maintenance and the probe needs to be replaced every 18 months. Get yourself a refractometer for SG. They cost under $50 and are pretty much bulletproof. Make sure to get calibration solution to check it when you first get it.

Then you want to get some quality test kits for nitrite, nitrate, calcium, magnesium and phosphate. I use Salifert or LaMotte but there are others. Testing should be be done weekly.

You can not tell the water parameters by look or feel so you must test. If something is bad enough that you can smell it you have probably lost your tank livestock.
cmor1701d is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 02:51 PM   #7
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
land locked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 203
I have seen the refractometer on ebay I will look into those again. There are digital ph monitors for as little as 9.99 but not sure about accuracy at that price. They are not the Pinpoint ones I see advertised in the fish magazines.
__________________
land locked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 02:57 PM   #8
SW REEF 20+ YEARS
Community Admin
 
melosu58's Avatar



Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 38,694
Do the digital ones need constant calibrating?
__________________

SITE ADMINISTRATOR

You can view many of my fish and corals in my photo albums in my profile.

View my tank


AA Community Rules|AA TOS

Forums 101 - posting, accounts, basics
melosu58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 03:04 PM   #9
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,462
PinPoint salinity monitors do require general maintenance in removing salt deposits and/or residues, especially from the actual electrode. The salinity monitors are also more accurate than refractometers, but less durable. If you do purchase the Salinity monitor I would also purchase the AC adapter kit in case you wish to monitor continuously (battery drain can lead to improper readings otherwise). There are other brand monitors available for high-end users, but more expensive.

Depending on what your plans are for the tank inhabitant-wise, the usual test kits purchased are for: NH3 (mainly cycling), NO2 (cycling), NO3, pH, Salinity, Ca, Alk, and PO4. Some people will also include Mg. Salifert, API, and Elos are often used, but higher end kits such as Lamotte or Hach are also available to hobbyists (expensive).
__________________
Innovator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 03:05 PM   #10
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
land locked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 203


This is all is says: Nothing about how often to calibrate.

★ Brand New Hand-held pH Meter
★ Use for measuring pH level in liquid
★ Free from traditional litmus tests
★ Easy to use
★ Provide you a precise and quick measurement
★ 2 Calibration trimmer included
★ LCD Display allows you to read the value directly from the screen


★ Portable and hand-held size
★ Color: Red
★ Range: 0.1pH - 14pH
★ Resolution: 0.1pH
★ Powered by: 4 x 1.5v button battery (LR44)


★ Hand-held pH Meter x 1
★ Screw Driver x 1
★ Manual x 1 ★ Plastic Case x 1
__________________
land locked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 03:07 PM   #11
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,462
I would calibrate monthly to be on the safe side. Calibration takes 5mins.
__________________
Innovator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 04:18 PM   #12
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Seattle-ish, WA
Posts: 5,340
Quote:
Originally Posted by land locked View Post
...There are digital ph monitors for as little as 9.99 but not sure about accuracy at that price. They are not the Pinpoint ones I see advertised in the fish magazines.
Seeing that pH meters from reputable manufacturers (Hanna, Milwaukee, Pinpoint, etc) start at $30 or so and go up from there, I'd really question the accuracy of a $10 no name unit.

Test kits are pretty cheap, accurate and don't need batteries or calibration.

[Edit: If you go electronic, just keep in mind that it can fail too - and probably in more ways than good ol' manual test kits. Putting too much trust in your electronics can lead to big problems. Just saw a post recently on another board from a person who was trying to figure out why their pH was dropping day after day. They were dosing trying to get it back up. But it was still going down. The short story is a cat chewed into the cable going from the pH probe to the monitor. Moral of story is always question "strange" readings and have the ability to test the old-fashioned way!]
__________________
Kurt_Nelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 08:52 PM   #13
AA Team Emeritus
 
roka64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 13,858
Send a message via AIM to roka64 Send a message via Yahoo to roka64
I'll go ahead and move this to the General Hardware/Equipment.
Land locked, don't sweat it, we were all new at one time.
__________________
Age is relative, you are only as old as you act....of course, this works in reverse....

Questions loved, heeded advice greatly appreciated!

Vote for AA
Good reading about:
Nitrogen Cycle
Fishless Cycling
Need more help?
Articles
Acronym List

--Scott
roka64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 08:56 PM   #14
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,462
Erm, doesn't the previous thread created answer the same questions: http://www.aquariumadvice.com/forums...ch-101243.html
__________________
Innovator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 10:24 PM   #15
SW REEF 20+ YEARS
Community Admin
 
melosu58's Avatar



Tank of the Month Award
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 38,694
Both threads were merged together.Please dont double post your threads in separate forums. This is the appropiate forum for this question. Not getting on you landlocked just trying to keep the forums looking neat. As Scott said we were all newbs at one time so dont sweat it.
__________________

SITE ADMINISTRATOR

You can view many of my fish and corals in my photo albums in my profile.

View my tank


AA Community Rules|AA TOS

Forums 101 - posting, accounts, basics
melosu58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2008, 03:50 PM   #16
Aquarium Advice Freak
 
land locked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 203
Thanks for the advice, I just purchased a refractometer. High is not my thing anyway I just wanted to make sure I was not missing out of the greatest thing ever
__________________
land locked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2008, 04:04 PM   #17
Aquarium Advice FINatic
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Erie, CO
Posts: 681
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt_Nelson View Post
Seeing that pH meters from reputable manufacturers (Hanna, Milwaukee, Pinpoint, etc) start at $30 or so and go up from there, I'd really question the accuracy of a $10 no name unit.

Test kits are pretty cheap, accurate and don't need batteries or calibration.

[Edit: If you go electronic, just keep in mind that it can fail too - and probably in more ways than good ol' manual test kits. Putting too much trust in your electronics can lead to big problems. Just saw a post recently on another board from a person who was trying to figure out why their pH was dropping day after day. They were dosing trying to get it back up. But it was still going down. The short story is a cat chewed into the cable going from the pH probe to the monitor. Moral of story is always question "strange" readings and have the ability to test the old-fashioned way!]
The failure you describe is not a result of the electronics involved but failure to maintain/check the equipment.

Mechanical methods are not fail safe nor error proof:

For example, someone could use the improper amount of fluids when running their test to get strange results. Someone could fail to clean their test tubes well enough. You could get different droplet sizes from your containers dependant upon pressure applied and/or velocity of ejection of the fluid (with a static nozzle size). Contamination of the sample could occur (whereby such contaminant concentrations in the test tube would be much higher than the concentrations in the aquarium).

You should question "strange" readings regardless of the method employed and always maintain and prepare your test equipment (whether electronic or mechanical/chemical in nature).
__________________
patryuji is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2008, 04:14 PM   #18
AA Team Emeritus
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Seattle-ish, WA
Posts: 5,340
Quote:
Originally Posted by patryuji View Post
The failure you describe is not a result of the electronics involved but failure to maintain/check the equipment.

Mechanical methods are not fail safe nor error proof:

For example, someone could use the improper amount of fluids when running their test to get strange results. Someone could fail to clean their test tubes well enough. You could get different droplet sizes from your containers dependant upon pressure applied and/or velocity of ejection of the fluid (with a static nozzle size). Contamination of the sample could occur (whereby such contaminant concentrations in the test tube would be much higher than the concentrations in the aquarium).

You should question "strange" readings regardless of the method employed and always maintain and prepare your test equipment (whether electronic or mechanical/chemical in nature).
Never said manual methods couldn't be buggered up too. I guess my point was that it just seems *most* people (not all!) don't even bat an eye as to what their electronic gizmos tell them. But I don't know of many people that put that same trust in a manual test tube result.

But you're right... no matter what the test method, "strange" results should be double checked.
__________________

__________________
Kurt_Nelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
high tech

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on AquariumAdvice.com

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
30g Long High Tech Planted Log meegosh Members Freshwater Tanks Showcase 43 07-31-2011 10:58 PM
56 Gallon High Tech Freshwater (Entire Setup) jcarlilesiu Archive 3 01-12-2010 03:22 PM
120g high-tech planted & 10g CRS/cherry shrimp evercl92 Members Freshwater Tanks Showcase 5 10-28-2007 07:19 PM
Cherry Shrimps in high tech tank - ok? punky Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 11 04-25-2007 09:26 PM
High-tech nano? dapellegrini Freshwater & Brackish - Planted Tanks 32 03-28-2007 01:23 AM







» Photo Contest Winners







All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.