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-   -   How is glass bonded in aquariums ? (https://www.aquariumadvice.com/forums/f23/how-is-glass-bonded-in-aquariums-378566.html)

Joe_D 11-29-2021 08:45 PM

How is glass bonded in aquariums ?
 
Most have bonded glass tanks
However,, how many know just how the glass is bonded ?
Yes, most know a special silicone is used but, how does that safely bond glass in our tanks?

This is basically how....:)
"Silicone is a polymer mainly composed of silicon and oxygen. Glass is mostly silicon dioxide, so if the silicone is in contact with glass as it cures, it can form a very strong bond "

jake37 11-30-2021 01:52 AM

Well I take a simplistic view; silicon is glass glue so the glass panels are 'glued' together with glass glue ;)

Joe_D 11-30-2021 11:29 AM

Yeah, we can discuss semantics of course. :)
However, the fact remains that silicone boding glass does not bond like what we think of glue does.

A glue bonds by what is to be bonded absorbing a lot of the glue as it hardens.

Silicone bonds glass by a chemical reaction between the two.

Brookster123 12-02-2021 04:04 PM

I don't think you're correct. Pretty sure it's suction. A chemical reaction would have the glass scarred/altered when silicone is removed. A chemical bond would be when fusing pvc with pvc cement, that alters the compounds and they become one. Silicone and glass never become one, the silicone relies on an even application, clean surface and pressure to cure and hold. Acrylic using a chemical weld similar to pvc, when acrylic is chemically welded properly, 2 pieces become one.

Joe_D 12-03-2021 02:13 AM

one can "think" anything they want but facts can nor be disputed.:)

Brookster123 12-03-2021 04:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe_D (Post 3569758)
one can "think" anything they want but facts can nor be disputed.:)

These facts you speak of? Any links?

BigRedsReefs10 12-03-2021 08:07 AM

Your misunderstanding this, if silicone chemically bonded glass then it would take much more than a simple razor blade to disassemble a tank. While it may not be the exact same as gluing 2 pieces of wood together it is essentially the same thing. There is no “chemical bonding” of the glass, there is curing time , or drying time, for the silicone to harden and set up.

Joe_D 12-03-2021 11:15 AM

" While it may not be the exact same as gluing......"
Is that not what have been saying? :)

Silicone on glass does create a chemical reaction between the two which causes the bonding

Glue cases no chemical between it and what it is being bonded it just dries to something relatively hard add the more it is adsorbed the better the bond.
it is common knowledge that anything that will not absorb a glue to one extent or another, the harder it is to bond with a common "glue" :)

Aiken Drum 12-03-2021 05:00 PM

This was something i found about glass/silicone bonding in structural silicone glazing (SSG) systems used in buildings. Ive no idea if this is relevant to aquarium building or not.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/explo...ne-glass-olson

If i read that correctly its not so much a chemical reaction, but more similarities in the molecular structure of glass and silicone that cause the two to mesh. I'm imagining something akin to velcro or lego that forms a strong bond but can still be pulled apart and seperated.

Joe_D 12-03-2021 09:19 PM

Yeah , maybe chemical reaction is the wrong term to use but in the end the bonding processes is not like glue bonding wood, etc:)

LHotelUmbraQua 01-17-2022 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe_D (Post 3569773)
Yeah , maybe chemical reaction is the wrong term to use but in the end the bonding processes is not like glue bonding wood, etc:)


Joe,

This is interesting. Perhaps what is happening "chemically" or through the meshing or merging of glass and silicone, the "merging" may cause the two substances to, in a manner of speaking, "become one," where the surfaces make contact. Some fibers do this in more expensive dyeing processes -- cotton or wool fiber "becomes" the color, and fiber and dye is not distinguishable. Not a perfect correlation, only in the sense of going beyond mere bonding or hardening, which may be what you are getting at. (Is it?)

Speaking of adherence / joining, what is the preferred arrangement of sheets of cut glass on corners and bottom edges when building a tank? Particularly with regard to the weight of water pressing out and down.

Is it preferable to rest the 3/4" bottom edge of a wall on the top surface of the bottom glass when joining, so its weight is better supported? Or to adhere the inner surface of a wall against the outside edges of the glass?

I saw a combination of the two today -- the right and left walls resting on the counter, and joined to the bottom panel of thick glass against its edge; and, front and back walls supported by the floor of the tank, with square poly or plastic feet lifting the floor slightly off the counter, leaving some space under the tank.

It was a pleasing arrangement of thick glass, and got me to thinking about weight, and how strongly these materials are joined. Which may go to your original post.

jake37 01-19-2022 11:15 AM

I'm not sure they become 'one' as you can easily sep the two pieces of glass via cutting away the glue...

Quote:

Originally Posted by LHotelUmbraQua (Post 3571206)
Joe,

This is interesting. Perhaps what is happening "chemically" or through the meshing or merging of glass and silicone, the "merging" may cause the two substances to, in a manner of speaking, "become one," where the surfaces make contact. Some fibers do this in more expensive dyeing processes -- cotton or wool fiber "becomes" the color, and fiber and dye is not distinguishable. Not a perfect correlation, only in the sense of going beyond mere bonding or hardening, which may be what you are getting at. (Is it?)

Speaking of adherence / joining, what is the preferred arrangement of sheets of cut glass on corners and bottom edges when building a tank? Particularly with regard to the weight of water pressing out and down.

Is it preferable to rest the 3/4" bottom edge of a wall on the top surface of the bottom glass when joining, so its weight is better supported? Or to adhere the inner surface of a wall against the outside edges of the glass?

I saw a combination of the two today -- the right and left walls resting on the counter, and joined to the bottom panel of thick glass against its edge; and, front and back walls supported by the floor of the tank, with square poly or plastic feet lifting the floor slightly off the counter, leaving some space under the tank.

It was a pleasing arrangement of thick glass, and got me to thinking about weight, and how strongly these materials are joined. Which may go to your original post.


LHotelUmbraQua 01-19-2022 06:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jake37 (Post 3571296)
I'm not sure they become 'one' as you can easily sep the two pieces of glass via cutting away the glue...

Good to know. It’s hard to get the sense the of meaning of words that are used re different substances, like bonding with glue, and bonding like glass as described. Getting to the technical material meaning someone has in their head is important. Thank you reading my explanation and taking the time to answer.


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