Bumblebee Goby issue?

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trcssp

Aquarium Advice Newbie
Joined
Jun 13, 2024
Messages
3
Location
Spring Hill, FL
Hi there. I’ve had guppies die within first week of having them. Today I noticed something white on my goby? What is this? See photo. Thanks in advance
 

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That appears to be either a fungal infection or the beginning of Columnaris. If the Guppies died with a similar white patch as the Goby, you should treat for Columnaris. Is this fish in brackish water or straight fresh water?
 
Hello! It’s freshwater. How do you treat for that? FYI, I do have a Mexican crayfish in the tank along with tetras, Pygmy Cory’s and a pleco
 
There are a variety of species classified as bumblebee gobies. Some will do better than others in freshwater, but generally they are a brackish water species, and the ones that are commonly kept in freshwater need to be in hard water with a lot of disolved minerals to thrive.

My understanding is that bumblebee gobys are born in freshwater, and then migrate to brackish water as they mature. So in aquariums they are better starting out in whatever water type they are kept in at the aquarium store and gradually transitioning to brackish as they get older.

Tetras are soft water fish and guppies are hard water fish, so if the tetras are doing good and the gobys and guppies arent that might suggest your water doesn't suit guppies and gobys. These fish need different set ups, in particular the gobys.

I keep guppies and tetras in the same water, (although different tanks), but my water is fairly neutral. Not particularly hard or soft.

Do you know your water parameters ? pH, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, general hardness and carbonate hardness.
 
Thank you for this info!! I do have hard water, nitrates are mildly up so I’ll do a water change. Everything else is within range
 
Thank you for this info!! I do have hard water, nitrates are mildly up so I’ll do a water change. Everything else is within range
Hard water is not the same as brackish water. Salt is one of the chemicals that helps treat columnaris but as Aiken pointed out, you have an assortment of fish that really shouldn't be kept together because of their different water needs. If your Tetras were locally bred, they are used to hard water because they were most likely bred in Tampa water but if they were wild caught, your water would be all wrong for them. (Just an FYI: I'm in Lake Wales and my water is very different from Tampa's water so your water parameters may also be different from Tampa's water.) If you choose to keep these gobies in a separate tank, you need to get your water to " brackish." I strongly suggest you get a hydrometer and add aquarium salt or marine salt ( for saltwater tanks) to gradually bring your specific gravity level to between 1.005 and 1.010. Start with 1 tablespoon per 5 gallons of actual water. ( Keep in mind that the way tanks are rated for gallons goes by outside dimensions of the aquarium so let's say a 10 gallon tank actually only holds about 9.25 actual gallons of water, not 10 gallons.) After 24 hours, test the specific gravity after that one tablespoon and adjust how much salt you need to add every 24 hours to get a level between 1.005 and 1.010. This will not work however in your current tank with your other fish.

Hope this helps. (y)
 
Thank you for this info!! I do have hard water, nitrates are mildly up so I’ll do a water change. Everything else is within range
I think you missed the point. While some bumblebee gobys will do ok in freshwater, many wont. They really should be in a brackish water set up which @Andy Sager has advised better than i could on how to set up.
 
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