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Old 02-03-2011, 10:51 AM   #1
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green algae

Hey I'm new to the hobby. I have a 46 bow tank that has been running for 3 months. Occupants include 2 false percula clowns, a pink spotted goby, a stripped damsel, a blue yellow tailed damsel about 30 blue legged hermits 5 red footed hermits, about 5 turbos and a tiger pistol shrimp. Here in the last few weeks I have been getting a green algae on my glass. I have read this is common in new tanks. My question is how long should I expect this to last? I have to clean glass about twice a week now. I use ro/di water for changes and top off. My 2x39w t5 are running for about 9 hours a day. I know water nutrient levels and light are what contributes to nuisance algae growth. Sorry to ramble, I just want it gone.
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Old 02-03-2011, 12:12 PM   #2
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We just had this discusion here are some of the facts.

Originally it was for brown algae. But the same is for all Algae.

How do I control or stop the growth of brown algae?

You really cannot entirely "stop" the growth of any algae, green brown, or red, but with some good tank management practices, the rate of algae growth can be reduced. There is no such thing as an algae-free aquarium. An aquarium that never gets any algae growth is probably not a healthy environment for fish. Algae should never be controlled through the use of chemicals. Most algae-control chemicals work by inhibiting the reproduction of algae, and may also inhibit the growth of plants and beneficial bacteria. We have seen some disasterous results caused by over-use of algacides. These chemicals should only be used to get rid of green water or very bad algae problems, then good tank management alone should be used to prevent re-occurrences. It is important to remember that algae is a "plant-like" organism. Unlike a plant, it has no true roots, stems or leaves. Like a plant, it needs plenty of light and nutrients to grow (it already has the water). The first thing to look at is light. Aquariums should never be placed where they can receive a lot of direct or even indirect sunlight. Tank lights should be on no more than ten hours. The next factor is nutrients, and in aquariums, this means controlling nitrates and phosphates. Regular water changes and good filtration are important to eliminate nutrients. Vacuuming the gravel in a tank when doing a water change, removes many organics that decay into basic nitrates and phophates. A 25% water change every three to four weeks, or 10% a week, will help control the build-up of nutrients. As most city tap water contains phosphates, using reverse osmosis, distilled, or deionized water will also help. Using phosphate and/or nitrate removal media in a canister or power filter is also helpful. Water motion will also inhibit algae growth, as algae spores cannot settle and take "root" in an aquarium that has good circulation. Using small submersible pumps or powerheads in a tank, in addition to the regular filters will help add extra circulation to any aquarium.

This is the imput / From fort384
Diatoms can actually be caused by a lack of light, rather than too much, the reason I was asking.

I think based on the fact that the tank is still in its infancy, you will see the diatoms come under control naturally in a few months. Just clean for now, and you will get through it. So long as you keep up with your tank maintenance (PWCs), and keep the nitrates at a reasonable level, you will see them become less of a problem. Like your post said though, there is always algae in a healthy aquarium... especially a planted tank. The key is regular cleaning and maintenance to make sure it doesn't get out of control, and regular review of your water parameters and what you are adding to make sure you aren't bottoming out or have excess of a particular nutrient. Those magnetic algae scrubbers are a must have... I use them in my tanks at least a couple times a week to keep the glass crystal clear and clean.

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Old 02-03-2011, 12:18 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdultra View Post
We just had this discusion here are some of the facts.

How do I control or stop the growth of brown algae?

You really cannot entirely "stop" the growth of any algae, green brown, or red, but with some good tank management practices, the rate of algae growth can be reduced. There is no such thing as an algae-free aquarium. An aquarium that never gets any algae growth is probably not a healthy environment for fish. Algae should never be controlled through the use of chemicals. Most algae-control chemicals work by inhibiting the reproduction of algae, and may also inhibit the growth of plants and beneficial bacteria. We have seen some disasterous results caused by over-use of algacides. These chemicals should only be used to get rid of green water or very bad algae problems, then good tank management alone should be used to prevent re-occurrences. It is important to remember that algae is a "plant-like" organism. Unlike a plant, it has no true roots, stems or leaves. Like a plant, it needs plenty of light and nutrients to grow (it already has the water). The first thing to look at is light. Aquariums should never be placed where they can receive a lot of direct or even indirect sunlight. Tank lights should be on no more than ten hours. The next factor is nutrients, and in aquariums, this means controlling nitrates and phosphates. Regular water changes and good filtration are important to eliminate nutrients. Vacuuming the gravel in a tank when doing a water change, removes many organics that decay into basic nitrates and phophates. A 25% water change every three to four weeks, or 10% a week, will help control the build-up of nutrients. As most city tap water contains phosphates, using reverse osmosis, distilled, or deionized water will also help. Using phosphate and/or nitrate removal media in a canister or power filter is also helpful. Water motion will also inhibit algae growth, as algae spores cannot settle and take "root" in an aquarium that has good circulation. Using small submersible pumps or powerheads in a tank, in addition to the regular filters will help add extra circulation to any aquarium.

This is the imput / From fort384
Diatoms can actually be caused by a lack of light, rather than too much, the reason I was asking.

I think based on the fact that the tank is still in its infancy, you will see the diatoms come under control naturally in a few months. Just clean for now, and you will get through it. So long as you keep up with your tank maintenance (PWCs), and keep the nitrates at a reasonable level, you will see them become less of a problem. Like your post said though, there is always algae in a healthy aquarium... especially a planted tank. The key is regular cleaning and maintenance to make sure it doesn't get out of control, and regular review of your water parameters and what you are adding to make sure you aren't bottoming out or have excess of a particular nutrient. Those magnetic algae scrubbers are a must have... I use them in my tanks at least a couple times a week to keep the glass crystal clear and clean.

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PO4 is a huge contributor to algae issues. Unfortunately, it is also needed by plants, and one of the major nutrients needed for plants (at least the P part of the PO4 ). Algae are simple forms of plants, so unfortunately what is good for the plants is good for algae!

I dose PO4 in all my tanks... but you have to be careful with it. If it is excessively high, it will contribute significantly to a massive algae outbreak. Most likely, if you don't have very high light, there will be enough in the tank to keep the plants happy, and there won't be a requirement to add more.

If you are worried about it, you can pick up an PO4 test kit... any store that sells saltwater fish/stuff will have one. They are pricey though (usually $20 or more for a decent low range PO4 test), and if you don't think it is an issue, it is not a requirement.
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Old 02-03-2011, 04:13 PM   #4
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Moved to the SW general discussion forum. You`ll get more answers there.
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