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Old 03-27-2011, 01:32 AM   #21
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Well it's been a few days and the coral looks worse. The entire one side has receded now showing his round skeleton. the other side seems ok but doesnt look like it did either.

At what point do I give up? Is having a dying coral bad to have in the tank? And what do i do with it if it dies, it's not a fish that can be flushed....
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Old 03-27-2011, 02:26 AM   #22
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I leave the skeleton in my tank and usually put it in a place that gsp or zoas can cover it. Have you looked up brown jelly disease? Maybe you could frag off the dieing part and save the rest.
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Old 03-27-2011, 02:29 AM   #23
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Hmm i dont even know where to begin to frag off the alive section. i dont think I'd have the stomach for it either. If it dies it won't nuke my tank?
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Old 03-27-2011, 03:29 AM   #24
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It shouldn't nuke your tank no, I would leave the skeleton in there...my brother was doing some research and found a guy who left his in the tank and a few months later it released baby ones from its center...i dno if thats true at all haha but i always keep mine in there now just in case

Just googled and found this, i copied and pasted but the link is there to read more

Brain coral reproduction? - 3reef Forums
Open Brain Coral

ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION IN TRACHYPHYLLIA.

This report specifically addresses a fascinating observation by the authors of numerous asexually produced daughter colonies of Trachyphyllia in an aquarium specimen not unlike anthocauli in fungiids. In popular literature, anthocauli production has been reported in the family funglidae (Borneman, 2001; Calfo, 2001; Delbeck & Sprung, 1994 veron 1986). Other forms of asexual reproduction have been reported in Trachyphyllia in captivity. Small polyp buds, for example have been observed to form in growth around the base of parent colonies in similar fashion to the budding commonly observed in Caryophyllids (including so-called Bubble, Hammer, Octopus, Torch, and Frogspawn corals). However, the distinct formation of daughter colonies through de-calcification of a parent colony has been scarcely reported non-fungiids. The occurrence seems to be uncommon if only for the fact that aquarists are unlikely to leave the denuded "skeleton" (corallum of the parent colony in plain view for months with the hope of it rising from the dead so to speak.

In the production of anghocauli in fungiids. A seemingly dead, denuded parent may appear to spring back to life from the remant "skeleton" after several to many months of dormancy. Daughter colonies are formed by the decalcifying parent as they bud and grow along the septa. Anthocauli can form on either side of a fungiid, but it remains to be seen if clones in like kind can be produced on the corallum of Trachyphyllia.

STEVEN'S DISCOVERY OF THE DESCRIBED TRACHYPHYLIIA COLONY.

The illustrated Trachyphyllia was in a client's 150 gallon reef aquarium for over three years. On Jan 16th, 2002, it was discovered that at some point in time since the last service call, the Trachyphyllia had been overturned on the sand floor. The most likely cause was a large Coris wrasse. Unfortunately for the coral, no one in residence noticed or cared enough to do anything about the coral's distress. When it was discovered, the coral was righted and an attempt was made to gently vacuum off the necrotic tissue with a slow siphon from 1/4" tubing. Alas, the coral was denuded of apparent tissue, leaving behind only the seemingly dead, white corallum. Service on the aquarium was completed and the "skeleton" was left in the tank. The bare, exposed "skeleton" quickly became prime real estate for nuisance algae, Valonia and Derbesia, probably fueled in large part by the lingering nutrients from the decomposed parent tissue. There was little concern for plague algae at this time, as faith in aggressive protein skimming and water changes would take care of them in short order.

On Feruary 23rd, 2002, during another service call, some flashes of iridescent green were apparent between the algae on the denuded Trachyphyllia corallum. The first thought was that a green Zooantharian Protopalythoa, in the display had spread. Upon further investigation it was observed for the first time that daughter colonies appeared to be springing forth from the septa of the remmant corallum. The event seemed to be very similar to anthocauli production in the fugiids. Without having heard of this reporductive strategy reported before in captive Trachyphyllia, a call to co author and friend, Anthony Calfo, led us in discussion to believe that there was indeed merit in offering a report of this scarcely described reproductive stragegy to the body of popular literature on reef aquariology. The corallum was removed to a better display for dedicated care and photography.

As of April 18th the alga has all but disappeared and a total of 37 baby Trachyphyllia, eleven of which have become apparent since April 1st.

What is most promising about this observation is that the families fungiidae and Trchyphyllidae are distant in Veron's family tree of Scleractinia (Veron, 1986). If both of these coral families are capable of producing anthocauli, then perhaps there are more species in the trade that share this stragegy of asexual reporduction. Some aquarists may be very pleasantly surprised and rewarded for leaving a seemingly dead and denuded scleractinian "skeleton" in an otherwise heathy display with hope for the continuation of life.
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Old 03-27-2011, 03:34 AM   #25
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Oh yahhh totally keep that skeleton in your tank! check out this thread i just found!!

The story of the MAMA RED PLATE CORAL! - Reef Central Online Community

Hope it happens for brains too!
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Old 03-27-2011, 03:43 AM   #26
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alsooo what did it look like before it was bleached? I'd like to see it.
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Old 03-27-2011, 12:36 PM   #27
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This is the original picture the day I bought it. :-(
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Old 03-27-2011, 12:37 PM   #28
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what do you think happened to it?
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Old 03-27-2011, 12:40 PM   #29
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I'm not sure. i have quad t5's so maybe it was too much light? Or just a bad specimen i guess. I'm still hoping it will bounce back
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Old 03-27-2011, 03:33 PM   #30
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It is possible it will come back. Do you have anything like revive or coral rx to dip it in? Make sure you shake it so it closes before taking out of the water do dip it.
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